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Emma Raducanu's 'strange' coaching setup as Brite denied 'priority time' with Louis Cayer

EMMA RADUCANU is currently not getting priority time with her main coach. (Author: Gardener)

Emma Raducanu'sEmma Raducanu's 'strange' coaching structure doesn't allow her to spend time with LTA coach Louis Cayer in front of British doubles players. After her second-round loss at the French Open, John McEnroe claimed that the "revolving door of coaches" since the British No. 1's US Open win had hampered her career. She then gave up the German Torben Beltz before the clay court season. Since the Madrid Open, the world No. 12 has had support from LTA coaches Cayer and Iain Bates. Canadian Cayer is widely regarded as the best doubles coach in the world with an in-depth technical knowledge of the game. But Joe Salisbury, the world no , so we'll see if that changes at all. It's a bit of an odd situation that he gets along with Emma the moment he's helping her out but not really her coach which I think is the same as what he's doing for us. "But we can have other coaches travel with us, but there are a lot of players to manage and he won't always be able to be there for all practices and games. I can't speak for her if she'll be happy." Neal Skupski, who reached Thursday's third round alongside Dutch partner Wesley Koolhof, added: "I think Louis is trying to level things out. He told us at the very beginning when it happened that the boys would get priority in doubles. “So usually with Louis there is a priority like placement. So if anyone has a practice, Joe is #1 right now. So he gets first time for Louis. "So we're not at the same time and then it's the next person in the rankings. There weren't any problems at the moment." Liverpool fan Skupski added: "He's very good technically. I don't know how he is with singles. "I don't know how much influence he has on Emma. I haven't seen him on the pitch with her, seen what he's actually doing. I think he's in some sort of an advisory role, I'm sure he'll try to put his stamp on Emma's game in some way.

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John McEnroe slams Emma Raducanu's 'incredible' decision

John McEnroe has slammed Emma Raducanu's coaching decision after the British tennis sensation was eliminated at the French Open. (Author: Gardener)

John McEnroeJohn McEnroe believes Emma Raducanu was "overwhelmed" by her remarkable Grand Slam win and slammed the "incredible" decision to change coaches following her exit from the French Open. Raducanu became the first qualifier in history to win a Major, ending Britain's 44-year wait for a women's singles Grand Slam champion at the US Open last year. Since her fairytale run in New York, Raducanu has suffered second-round defeats at back-to-back Grand Slams, with the 19-year-old struggling to repeat the exploits that saw her triumph at Flushing Meadows. The British number one parted ways with Andrew Richardson after their US Open win and then did without Torben Beltz ahead of the clay court season. American tennis legend McEnroe, who won seven Grand Slams, says the coaches' "revolving door" has hampered Raducanu's development. The 63-year-old told Eurosport: "Honestly if I won the US Open after qualifying I wouldn't change my coach at least for next year so I don't understand this move. But I just don't think that idea of ​​a revolving door of coaches is good for a player, let alone a player at this stage in her career. "We'll have to wait and see and hopefully she finds someone to stay with for a while. She's changed coaches three, four or five times, which is incredible for someone who's just won a major." McEnroe, who slammed Raducanu after she pulled out of her fourth-round match at Wimbledon last year, thinks so too Brit is struggling to cope with the 'expectation' of being a big winner. "We have to keep a little perspective here," he added. “Last year at Wimbledon she couldn't finish a match because of stress and it got to be too much. “Then she came out and did something that no one has ever done – man or woman – in 150 years of tennis, coming out of qualifiers and winning. “Suddenly she has this pressure, this expectation, which has also become a bit overwhelming. Hopefully she finds that in the next year or two.” Raducanu faced Aliaksandra Sasnovich of Belarus in the second round of the French Open, winning the first set 6-3 before winning just two more games and being eliminated. However, she was keen to take the positive results of her clay court campaign with her, telling reporters, "I'm very happy with the progress I'm making. “I feel like I play pretty good tennis and I'm definitely working on the practice court. Certain things I work on at the practice site that pay off don't show up right away. I'm definitely there.'

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Britain's world no. 1 in doubles opens up questions about joint coach with Emma Raducanu

Raducanu has a timeshare agreement with dual coach Louis Cayer (Author: Gardener)

BritainEmma Raducanu was kicked out of the French Open by Aliaksandra Sasnovich on Wednesday. The distinctiveness of Emma Raducanu's coaching arrangements has been highlighted for the second time in as many days, this time by world top doubles player Joe Salisbury. Shortly after Raducanu's exit in the second round of the French Open on Wednesday, Eurosport commentator John McEnroe hinted that their decision not to hire a traditional coach was "incredible". Now Salisbury has commented on the timeshare arrangement Raducanu has with Louis Cayer, the learned technical coach who normally focuses on the British doubles specialists. "Louis has said at the moment that the boys in doubles are still his priority," said Salisbury, who hails from Putney, south London, after moving into the second round with a comfortable straight set win at Roland Garros. "It's a bit of an odd situation that he's getting along with Emma right now where he's helping her but not really her trainer," Salisbury added. "There are a lot of players to manage and he won't always be able to be there for all their practices and games. Cayer has been helping Raducanu rebuild her hitting technique since early April after her serve and forehand slipped into bad habits during her junior career. Raducanu's unorthodox coaching setup has come under the spotlight. Described as their 'technical advisor', he was seen in Madrid earlier this month working on analyzing their games on his complex 'Dartfish' computer system. But Cayer himself still views his work with Raducanu as an extracurricular role, as opposed to the bread and butter of his dual-coach duties. He was spotted in her players' box in Madrid but wasn't there at all during her two appearances at the French Open. "Louis is great," said Neal Skupski, another leading British doubles player who reached the third round in Paris. "He's been great for me, he's changed my game quite a bit since I left college. I'm sure he'll try to put his stamp on Emma's game in some way. “He told us right at the start when it happened that the boys will have priority in doubles. Usually, priority is given to ranking. Joe is number 1 right now, so he gets first time for Louis. Raducanu is now focused on the grass after their disappointing 3-6, 6-1, 6-1 defeat by Belarus' Aliaksandra Sasnovich on Wednesday. Although she started brilliantly, her physical intensity dropped dramatically after the 47-minute first set and Tim Henman was just one of many observers to suggest she needed to work on her fitness. Forehand is every tennis pro's bread-and-butter, and Raducanus wasn't good enough on Wednesday to earn a third-round berth in a Major. In the later stages of the second set she had hit just two winners from that cross while Sasnovich had slammed 15. At times it felt as if she was caught between two thoughts: whether to hit the ball flat and aggressively or loop it with heavy topspin in the more traditional clay-court way. The absence of the drop shot from Raducanu's Paris repertoire is all the more surprising given her skillful use of it in her two wins in Madrid earlier this month. The one time it appeared on set point against Linda Noskova on Monday, it worked well. But Raducanu couldn't bring it out, and that put extra pressure on her backhand - the only real strength of her tournament - to get all the work done. Again, Sasnovich showed the way here, regularly dropping winners with the carelessness of a seasoned clay court. Raducanu moved well in the opening set, but as the match progressed you could feel her legs were getting heavy. But when Sasnovich upped the aggression in the second set, Raducanu instead jumped for the ball – a less physically demanding and practically less effective method. As Tim Henman put it at Eurosport: “Emma Raducanu got off to a good start today but maybe wasn't quite physically able to keep up the level. This comes back to the forehand and Raducanu's lack of confidence in them at the moment. As veteran coach and analyst Craig O'Shannessy noted in his Brain Game Tennis blog, 55 percent of their groundstrokes were backhands, while the best players -- especially on clay -- tend to step back slightly to get their forehand shots more into the mix Game. Sasnovich brilliantly used the back-away trick to salvage break points early in the third set, hitting a devastating forehand from so far off the court she was practically in her own backhand tramlines.

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Emma Raducanu can look forward to a year on the road but coaching remains an issue

After her first clay-court season ended in the second round of the French Open, expectations will rise when Wimbledon beckons (Author: Gardener)

Emma Raducanus Emma Raducanu dusted the dirt off her clay court shoes and ditched them until next year after her second-round loss to Aliaksandra Sasnovich on Wednesday, a remarkable cycle coming to an end. After making her professional debut the week after the French Open at the small grass court in Nottingham last year, Raducanu has now completed a year at the highest level of professional tennis. It is above all a moment of reflection after a manic 12 months of life changes, a mood she seemed to be in even before her departure in Paris: “We said this morning with my team, it's quite much a one-year anniversary since my comeback to competitive tennis," she said on Thursday. “I played a UK tour [a low-level national event] in Connaught. I think I've come a long way since then. Ever since Raducanu took her first timid steps on the WTA Tour last June, when even her first round against Harriet Dart was too overwhelming for her to play her best tennis, she has mastered the madness of her breakthrough at Wimbledon. Then, on her first extended trip abroad, she left after winning the US Open. Certain difficulties have accompanied their success. Since the US Open, Raducanu has lost more than he has won, posting a 10-13 record and retiring with myriad physical ailments. Every fight Raducanu has had this year should primarily serve as a reminder of how unusual and amazing her run at the US Open was. She was clearly unprepared for the rigors of the tour, either physically or mentally, but was able to play 10 consecutive games at the highest level from qualifying onwards and won without dropping a set. That run showed the potential she has, but building a lasting career and a game that can hold up no matter the conditions, form or opponent is another matter entirely. In the WTA race, the annual rankings, Raducanu is currently ranked 61st, reflecting her current stature more accurately than her 11th rank. Even without her US Open title, simply making the top 100 would have been just a year after her WTA Debut done has been a significant success. In the past year, Raducanu has certainly made decisions that need to be questioned, such as her publicized coaching situation. Certain parts of their game have also declined recently, notably their serves and forehands. More recently, she's spent so much of her debut clay-court season experimenting with her game on the surface, mixing in more curvaceous topspin, angles and trash, that on a hot day in faster conditions against Sasnovich her forehand despairs of attacking quality was missing who had contributed so much to their success. The tennis career is long, there are slumps to cope with, mistakes to be made. This doesn't just apply to Raducanu; Gauff, Fernandez and all the other young players of their generation also deserve the space to develop, especially in an individual sport like tennis where the young athletes learn to make their own decisions and have nowhere to hide. The reality for Raducanu, however, is that when she goes into the grass season and Wimbledon next, the attention, scrutiny and noise will be almost unbearable and she'll have to endure it somehow to keep progressing.

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Emma Raducanu reacts to French Open exit as stunning form continues

British tennis star and US Open champion Emma Raducanu insists she can take positives from her French Open debut despite losing in the second round. Raducanu, 19, looked in good shape... (Author: Gardener)

Emma RaducanuBritish tennis star and US Open champion Emma Raducanu insists she can take positives from her French Open debut despite losing in the second round. 19-year-old Raducanu looked in fine form as she won the first set against Aliaksandra Sasnovich 6-3. But Belarusian Sasnovich dominated the next two sets, limiting Raducanu to just two more games and knocking her out of the second Grand Slam of the year. Raducanu, who found fame at last year's US Open, has lost in the second round of her two Grand Slams since the stunning win in New York. I think my opponent played pretty well all the time and didn't make any mistakes," Raducanu said after her departure from Paris. "But yeah I think it was a long game for me but the whole clay court season overall has been pretty positive I would say." Raducanu said she expects to be in all four tournaments she's played in previously Losing first round at the French Open, she has five wins from nine games from her debut season on clay. "I think I've definitely gotten stronger over the course of the clay season," she added. I still have quite a long way to go on this surface but overall I would say I've definitely had a good first experience on the clay. I think I can definitely improve as well.” Insisting her first full season on the WTA Tour will be a learning experience, Raducanu says development on and off the pitch is more important than results. "I think this year has always been a challenge for me to adapt and find my feet," Raducanu said. “I feel like I've definitely grown a lot in the last 12 months. On and off the court I feel like I've probably gotten better at how much I'm fighting. "I think that's one of my biggest strengths and even more so this year and it's definitely been an eye opener to how good everyone is and how much depth the game has. "I think it's been a pretty positive year just because I've learned so much, and I think the amount of learning I've done outweighs any outcome, to be honest." Raducanu gets her attention now to the right grass season and a return to Wimbledon, where she reached the fourth round last summer before retiring for medical reasons. "It's going to be really nice to go home and play on home turf, on home turf," she added. "It will be a bit strange at first because I've been playing on clay for so long now it seems like weeks ago. "I'm really looking forward to playing in front of the fans at home and getting all that support. I had a little taste of that last year, but I have a feeling it could be even more this year. I'm just really looking forward to the atmosphere that's going to happen.” Better news for the Brits: Cameron Norrie became the first British singles player to reach the third round this year, beating Australia's Jason Kubler in straight sets. Britain's number two Dan Evans, 32, will look to join Norrie in the next round when he takes on Sweden's Mikael Ymer on Thursday.

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Emma Raducanu warns she's playing with a target on her back after French Open exit early on

Emma Raducanu believes her exploits at the US Open mean she's constantly playing with a target on her back after another early Grand Slam elimination. The 19-year-old had arguably put on one of her best tennis sets since winning the US Open last year to take a deserved early lead against Aliaksandra Sasnovich in the second round at Roland Garros on Wednesday. (Author: Gardener)

Emma RaducanuEmma Raducanu believes her exploits at the US Open mean she's constantly playing with a target on her back after another early Grand Slam elimination. The 19-year-old had arguably put on one of her best tennis sets since winning the US Open last year to take a deserved early lead against Aliaksandra Sasnovich in the second round at Roland Garros on Wednesday. But the Belarusian found her reach with her powerful groundstrokes to drop just two games in the last two sets of a 3-6, 6-1, 6-1 win. And Raducanu, after her second-round elimination at a Grand Slam since her triumph in New York, is all too aware that she has become a victim of her own early success. "It's different when you're someone who might have a target on their back," she said. That goal will be even more aligned with her when she gets her home grand slam at Wimbledon in a couple of weeks, which proved her breakthrough in the senior ranks when she booked her place in the fourth round ahead of that famous run in New York . But despite the sobering defeat in Paris yesterday from an earlier position of strength, she said it wouldn't hurt her confidence for the grass round of the season. "I think before that I would let the losses affect me more than now," said Raducanu, who is looking for a new coach after Torben Beltz split. This was Raducanu's first clay-court season on the WTA Tour, in which she racked up six wins and edged out female formplayer and Roland Garros hot favorite Iga Swiatek in straight sets in the quarterfinals of the Stuttgart Open. Speaking of the year so far, the world No. 12 from Britain said: "It's been a pretty positive year because I've learned so much and the amount of learning I've done outweighs any results. Off the court I don't do things crazy differently. I'm exactly the same person as I was 12 months ago, but yes, things have changed around me. On the pitch I feel like I've probably gotten better as I fight. That's one of the biggest strengths and even more so on this year's tour. It opened my eyes to how good everyone is and how deep the game is. “But there are definitely aspects of my game that I need to improve and catch up with my placement. I played four tournaments in a row and I thought I was going to lose the first round in each one, but I played a few games in each one."

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Emma Raducanu reflects on the clay court season and the last 12 months after the French Open exit

Emma Raducanu looked back on a positive clay-court season and a whirlwind 12 months after her second-round exit at the French Open. (Author: Gardener)

Emma RaducanuEmma Raducanu looked back on a positive clay-court season and a whirlwind 12 months after her second-round exit at the French Open. Raducanu ran out of breath against world No. 47 Aliaksandra Sasnovich on Court Suzanne Lenglen on Wednesday to exit the Grand Slam tournament. But when the Kent teenager was reminded that she played in a British Tour event at the Connaught Club in Essex a year ago this week, a month after graduating from high school, everything was put into a different perspective. Since that point 12 months ago, Raducanu has enjoyed incredible success at the US Open, reaching the fourth round at Wimbledon, as well as the second rounds in Paris and Australia. "We said this morning with my team, it's pretty much a one year anniversary since my comeback to competitive tennis. I played a Brit tour in Connaught," Raducanu said. “I think I've come a long way since then and I'm really excited to be driving around for the second time. “I think this year has always been a challenge for me to adapt and find my feet. I feel like I've definitely grown a lot in the last 12 months. "I think it's been a pretty positive year just because I've learned so much and I think the amount of learning I've made outweighs any result." Raducanu has a lot to take away from her clay court season, and a record 6-5 record of wins and losses is undeniable as she played her first professional match on the surface just last month. "I thought it was quite a long match, also quite physically," she said of her 3-1, 6-1, 6-1 loss to Sasnovich. "I think my opponent played pretty well all the time and didn't make any mistakes. It was a long match for me but the whole clay court season overall was pretty positive I'd say." "It will be really nice to go home and play on home turf," she said. "It will be a bit strange at first because I've been playing on a clay court for so long now that it seems like weeks ago it was a bit of a shock at first. But I'm really looking forward to playing at home in front of the fans and all the support. “Last year I got a little taste of that, but I feel like this year could be a little bit more. I'm just really looking forward to the atmosphere that will be there."

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What Novak Djokovic, Emma Raducanu and other top stars said about Wimbledon

THE Tennis Tours have removed all ranking points offered at Wimbledon in response to the tournament ban on Russian and Belarusian players. (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonWe use your registration to deliver content in a way you have consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include advertising from us and third parties, as we understand it. This may include advertising from us and third parties, as we understand it. Wimbledon has been the talk of the town for the past week, although the French Open is currently being played in Paris. Wimbledon has been the talk of the town for the past week, although the French Open is currently being played in Paris. After the tournament banned Russian and Belarusian players from participating this summer, the ATP and WTA tours responded by stripping Wimbledon of all ranking points offered at the tournament in separate statements last Friday. After the tournament banned Russian and Belarusian players from participating this summer, the ATP and WTA tours responded by stripping Wimbledon of all ranking points offered at the tournament in separate statements last Friday. Several players, including defending champion Novak Djokovic and Britain's No.1 Emma Raducanu, have since commented on the move and whether they will continue to compete without being able to improve their rankings. Several players, including defending champion Novak Djokovic and Britain's No.1 Emma Raducanu, have since commented on the move and whether they will continue to compete without being able to improve their rankings. Since the ATP and WTA confirmed they were removing ranking points awarded at The Championships this year, several players have said they were not consulted by the Tours on the decision. And many have questioned the decision to also remove the points for 2021, which will cost Djokovic his world No. 1 ranking while others will fall behind in the standings. Express Sport takes a look at what the top players have had to say about the news over the past few days. The world No. 1 slammed being stripped of points for the second time this season after being deported on the eve of the Australian Open in January and claimed Wimbledon's decision to ban Russians and Belarusians was 'wrong' , but determined to play. "I'm concerned because I'm not able to defend 4,000 points [in Australia and Wimbledon]," he said in the Roland Garros mixed zone earlier this week. He also agreed with the ATP's stance, adding: "But I'm pleased to see that the ATP and the players have decided to show Wimbledon that there are consequences when you make a wrong decision. Wimbledon is still Wimbledon, it was my dream as a kid, I never looked for prize money points but I understand the group of players involved. JUST IN: "Radical" Raducanu defended two things after losing at the French Open

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Emma Raducanu 'overwhelmed' by the pressure of being a Grand Slam winner

This marks Raducanu's second straight round Grand Slam exit as she struggles to repeat the exploits that earned her a stunning US Open win in 2021. (Author: Gardener)

Emma Raducanu 'Seven-time Grand Slam champion John McEnroe has claimed the pressure of being a big winner appears to have "overwhelmed" British number one Emma Raducanu. The 19-year-old Briton lost to world number 49 in the second round of the French Open on Wednesday. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, 28, from Belarus. This is Raducanu's second consecutive second-round elimination at a Grand Slam as she struggles to repeat the exploits that earned her a stunning US Open victory in 2021. McEnroe told Eurosport: "We have to keep a little perspective here. “Last year at Wimbledon she couldn't finish a match because of stress and it got to be too much. “Then she came out and did something that no one has ever done – man or woman – in 150 years of tennis, coming out of qualifiers and winning. "Suddenly she has this pressure, this expectation, which has also become a bit overwhelming." It's easy to forget that Raducanu is only 19 and has already achieved the highest honor in tennis in such dramatic fashion, becoming the first qualifier to win a Grand Slam last year. Now ranked at No. 12 in the world, she has struggled for form due to her ongoing back injuries and has come to terms with the newfound fame she has imposed both on and off the pitch. McEnroe added, "She changed coaches three, four or five times, which is incredible for someone who just won a major. Hopefully she finds that in the next year or two. "Honestly, if I won the US Open after qualifying, I wouldn't change my coach for at least the next year, so I don't understand that move. While she will know there is plenty of time to find the right fit, she will need to bounce back quickly if she is to improve on her recent performances in front of her home crowd at Wimbledon. After withdrawing in the fourth round of last year's tournament due to a reported illness, she will be desperate to try and prove the likes of McEnroe wrong and show she can handle the pressure her US Open title comes with brought himself. Watch every Roland-Garros match live and exclusively on Discovery+ and Eurosport

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John McEnroe revives old criticism of Raducanu's decision after defeat at the French Open

John McEnroe has once again criticized Emma Raducanu - this time after her French Open loss to Aliaksandra Sasnovich in the second round at Roland Garros (Author: Gardener)

John McEnroeJohn McEnroe has once again criticized Emma Raducanu - this time after her French Open loss to Aliaksandra Sasnovich in the second round at Roland Garros. John McEnroe helps tennis fans beat Tube strike by chauffeuring them to Wimbledon Grand Slams are too much for Emma Raducanu to bear at the moment. The British number one was eliminated from the French Open with a 6-3, 1-6, 1-6 loss to Aliaksandra Sasnovich. The defeat marked the teen's second consecutive elimination from a Major in the second round, a far cry from her historic run to the US Open title last September. This led McEnroe to believe the Bromley native has struggled with the extra attention since joining the sport's elite group of Grand Slam winners so early in her career. McEnroe told Eurosport: "We have to keep a little perspective here. At Wimbledon last year she couldn't finish a match due to stress and it got to be too much. Then she came out and did something that no one - man or woman - has ever done in 150 years of tennis, coming out of qualifiers and winning. All of a sudden she has this pressure, this expectation, which has also become a bit overwhelming.” It's well documented that Raducanu has made several changes to her coaching staff since winning at Flushing Meadows in 2021. When the German hired Torben Beltz as her new coach, it was expected their partnership would flourish and Raducanu would flourish under his tutelage. The number of changes on her team has stunned McEnroe, who said: "She's changed coaches three, four or five times, which is incredible for someone who just won a major. "She's kind of put herself in a difficult position because a lot is expected of her and we're not sure about the people around her that she's comfortable with right now. Honestly, if I won the US Open after qualifying, I wouldn't change my coach at least for the next year, so I don't understand this move. But I just don't think that idea of ​​a revolving door of coaches is good for a player, let alone a player at this stage in her career. Tennis legend John McEnroe has suggested that Emma Raducanu is struggling with the pressures of being a Grand Slam champion. "We'll have to wait and see and hopefully she finds someone to stay with for a while." The US Open champion finished the competition with 33 unforced errors and lost her second straight match to Sasnovich, the first coming at Indian Wells last year it now,” she said, staying positive.

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