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Andy Murray's encouraging message to Dominic Thiem at the end of their Madrid Open match

Andy Murray's heartfelt message to Dominic Thiem. (Author: Gardener)

Andy Murray'sHe was there, did that, got the shirt so it's no surprise Andy Murray had a heartfelt message for Dominic Thiem after their first round match at the Madrid Open. In a meeting between the two former US Open champions, Murray prevailed with a 6-3, 6-4 win in an hour and 42 minutes in the Spanish capital. But it wasn't just a clash of former Grand Slam winners, it was also a battle between two players who have been struggling with injuries in recent years. However, the worst seems to be behind him and there have been glimpses of the old Murray in recent months. Thiem, meanwhile, sustained a serious wrist injury in June last year and only made his comeback in April, losing in the first round in Belgrade, Estoril and now Madrid. On Monday there were words of comfort for Thiem from former world number 1 Murray. During his post-game press conference, Murray reiterated that he also struggled with a wrist injury early in his career. "I have no idea what exactly his injury was or if it was similar to mine but yeah wrists aren't easy," he said. “I also had a wrist problem in 2007 I think. Murray will be back in action in the Spanish capital on Tuesday as he faces 14th seed Denis Shapovalov in the second round of the ATP Masters 1000 event. The article WATCH: Andy Murray's encouraging message to Dominic Thiem at the end of their Madrid Open match appeared first on Tennis365.com.

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Andy Murray celebrates his return to clay with a win over Dominic Thiem at the Madrid Open

Murray won 6-3 6-4 in a first round meeting of the great champions (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayAndy Murray made a winning return on clay as he defeated Dominic Thiem in straight sets in the first round of the Madrid Open. The three-time Grand Slam champion triumphed 6-3, 6-4 in an hour and 42 minutes over 2020 US Open winner Thiem, who is still seeking his maiden win after his recent comeback from a wrist injury. Murray is playing as a wildcard in the Spanish capital after reversing his decision to skip the entire clay-court season. This was his first match back on the surface in almost two years and his first win on clay since 2017. The 34-year-old Scot broke his Austrian opponent once in each set to lead 4-2 in the first and then 2. 1 ahead in the second. Murray, who has worked again with coach Ivan Lendl, told Amazon Prime: "I had hardly played on it (clay) in the last five years but I trained on it for four weeks before coming here so maybe I felt more more comfortable than usual at the start of the clay court season and I played well. "I thought Dominic was playing well sometimes, but he's obviously just started playing again too, so he's making a few more mistakes than usual. Thiem is making his own injury comeback (Getty Images) "But I was happy with my game and moved particularly well and I've been working on that a lot over the last four weeks and it's changing the way I play the game." Compatriot Cameron Norrie also advanced to the second round, beating Soonwoo Kwon in two tough sets.

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Andy Murray justifies his Madrid wildcard with a win over Dominic Thiem

The three-time Grand Slam champion triumphed 6-3, 6-4 in an hour and 42 minutes over 2020 US Open winner Thiem. (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayAndy Murray had to respond to some critics after making a late decision to take a wildcard to the Madrid Open, but the former world No. 1 justifies that decision as he defeated Dominic Thiem in straight sets. The three-time Grand Slam champion triumphed 6-3, 6-4 in an hour and 42 minutes over 2020 US Open winner Thiem, who is still seeking his maiden win after his recent comeback from a wrist injury. Murray is playing as a wildcard in the Spanish capital after reversing his decision to skip the entire clay-court season. The 34-year-old Scot broke his Austrian opponent once in each set to go 4-2 in the first and 2-1 in the second. Murray, who has worked again with coach Ivan Lendl, told Amazon Prime: "I had hardly played on it (clay) in the last five years but I trained on it for four weeks before coming here so maybe I felt more more comfortable than usual at the start of the clay court season and I played well. "I thought Dominic was playing well sometimes, but he's obviously just started playing again too, so he's making a few more mistakes than usual. "But I was happy with the way I played and I moved particularly well, and that's something I've been working on a lot over the last four weeks and it's changing the way I play the game.” Countryman Cameron Norrie also advanced to the second round, beating Soonwoo Kwon in two hard sets. The article Andy Murray justifies his Madrid wildcard with a win over Dominic Thiem appeared first on Tennis365.com.

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Murray beats Thiem and reaches Madrid second round

Briton Andy Murray confidently beats 2020 US Open winner Dominic Thiem and reaches the second round of the Madrid Open. (Author: Gardener)

MurrayAndy Murray effortlessly beat 2020 US Open champion Dominic Thiem to advance to the second round of the Madrid Open. Former world number three Thiem is continuing his own comeback after eight months with a wrist injury but Murray proved to be the far stronger player. They ended up hugging as Murray told Thiem: "Go ahead. He added: "Hope you're feeling better soon mate. The 34-year-old, who has had his own well-documented injury woes, is the fourth Briton to advance in round two after Cameron Norrie wildcarded Dan Evans and Jack Draper to progress earlier. Murray grabbed a break in both sets, with Austria's Thiem struggling in particular with his forehand. Thiem, now ranked at No. 91 in the world, played his fourth match of the year after beginning his comeback in March but remains without a win. Murray had planned to skip the clay-court season but reversed his decision last month when he accepted a wild card for Madrid. "I've really hardly played on it [clay] in the last five years," Murray said. I thought Dominic was playing well at times, but he's obviously just started playing again. "Murray will next play Canada's 14th seed Denis Shapovalov, who beat him at Wimbledon last year. Norrie, the current British number one, meanwhile, shook off illness and an early setback to beat South Korean Kwon Soon-woo. Broken at serve, Norrie, 26, was 4-1 down in the first set, salvaging two set points before beating the qualifier 7-5, 7-5 sound like I just smoked a pack of Ziggies," said Norrie, who next meets American John Isner. He told Amazon Prime: "I was lucky to play here at all this week and was just lucky to get such a win against Soon-woo who was confident and played well. 6 (7-4) 6-3 win over American Tommy Paul In the women's game, former Romanian world number one Simona Halep claimed the win with a 6-4, 6-4 win over the 18- year-old American Coco Gauff reached the quarterfinals. Halep, the 2018 French Open winner who is unseeded in Madrid after a string of injuries, is yet to drop a set as she finds good form ahead of the clay-court Grand Slam at Roland Garros later this month.

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Murray beats Thiem and reaches Madrid second round

Briton Andy Murray confidently beats 2020 US Open winner Dominic Thiem and reaches the second round of the Madrid Open. (Author: Gardener)

MurrayAndy Murray effortlessly beat 2020 US Open champion Dominic Thiem to advance to the second round of the Madrid Open. Former world number three Thiem is continuing his own comeback after eight months with a wrist injury but Murray proved to be the far stronger player. They ended up hugging as Murray told Thiem: "Go ahead. He added: "Hope you're feeling better soon mate. The 34-year-old, who has had his own well-documented injury woes, is the fourth Briton to advance in round two after Cameron Norrie wildcarded Dan Evans and Jack Draper to progress earlier. Murray grabbed a break in both sets, with Austria's Thiem struggling in particular with his forehand. Thiem, now ranked at No. 91 in the world, played his fourth match of the year after beginning his comeback in March but remains without a win. Murray had planned to skip the clay-court season but reversed his decision last month when he accepted a wild card for Madrid. "I've really hardly played on it [clay] in the last five years," Murray said. I thought Dominic was playing well at times, but he's obviously just started playing again. "Murray will next play Canada's 14th seed Denis Shapovalov, who beat him at Wimbledon last year. Norrie, the current British number one, meanwhile, shook off illness and an early setback to beat South Korean Kwon Soon-woo. Broken at serve, Norrie, 26, was 4-1 down in the first set, salvaging two set points before beating the qualifier 7-5, 7-5 sound like I just smoked a pack of Ziggies," said Norrie, who next meets American John Isner. He told Amazon Prime: "I was lucky to play here at all this week and was just lucky to get such a win against Soon-woo who was confident and played well. 6 (7-4) 6-3 win over American Tommy Paul In the women's game, former Romanian world number one Simona Halep claimed the win with a 6-4, 6-4 win over the 18- year-old American Coco Gauff reached the quarterfinals. Halep, the 2018 French Open winner who is unseeded in Madrid after a string of injuries, is yet to drop a set as she finds good form ahead of the clay-court Grand Slam at Roland Garros later this month.

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Murray and Nadal come to the same conclusion over the Wimbledon ban of players

Andy Murray has said he supports the banning of Russian and Belarusian tennis stars from this year's Wimbledon. The All England Lawn Te (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonAndy Murray has said he does not support the banning of Russian and Belarusian tennis stars from this year's Wimbledon. The All England Lawn Tennis Club announced the ban in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, causing controversy, especially among players. A number of top stars including men's No. 2 Daniil Medvedev and women's No. 4 Aryna Sabalenka will be unable to compete in the Grand Slam which begins next month. Murray and Nadal, who have three and 21 Grand Slam titles respectively, have offered their opinions on the matter and the consensus is that they disagreed with the decision. "I'm not in favor of players being suspended," two-time Wimbledon champion Murray told reporters in Spain ahead of his first-round match against Dominic Thiem at the Madrid Open. “My understanding of the instructions was that Russians and Belarusians can play if they sign a declaration that they are against the war and against the Russian regime. I'm not sure how comfortable I would feel if anything happened to any of the players or their families [as a result]. I spoke to some Russian players. I feel really bad for the players who are not allowed to play and I understand that it will seem unfair to them. I feel for everyone, feel for the players who can't play, and I don't support either side." Rafael Nadal, who is a two-time Wimbledon winner himself, felt the ban on Russians and Belarusians from space England club unwell. Nadal said: “I find it very unfair [on] my Russian tennis peers, my peers. He added: "The 2,000 points whenever we go to the Grand Slams is really important and we have to go to those tournaments. "At the end of the day, what happens in our game doesn't matter when we see so many people dying and suffering and seeing the bad situation they have in Ukraine."

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Andy Murray beats Dominic Thiem to extend his adventure on clay

Murray won 6-3, 6-4 to advance to the second round of the Madrid Open where he will face either Denis Shapovalov or Ugo Humbert (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayAndy Murray has not even planned to set foot on a clay court this year for a long time in the past few months. After being handed a surprise wildcard to the Madrid Open, he played a solid, composed match to advance to the second round with a 6-3, 6-4 win over Dominic Thiem on Monday. "I played well," Murray told Amazon Prime. But I was happy with the way I played and moved particularly well; I've been working on that a lot over the past four weeks and it's changing the way I play the game.” The last time Murray and Thiem met on clay pretty much exactly five years ago, back in 2017, Murray was the number 1 in the world and Thiem was about to establish himself as arguably the second best clay court player in the world for a short period of time. While Murray is ranked 78th and has been coming back from his hip surgery for years, Thiem, 91st, is trying to recover from the low point of his career. His struggles were declining even before his injury, with motivation issues following his first Grand Slam title win at the 2020 US Open. Looking for new motivation, Thiem severely injured his right wrist in a match last June and his comeback attempts were stalled beset by numerous setbacks. In his rush to return quickly, he injured his wrist again and had to wear a new cast. Illness, a right ankle injury and then even a positive Covid test right after his comeback match have repeatedly delayed his return. Three tournaments after his comeback, Thiem came to Madrid not to win a match yet. After such a serious wrist injury, his forehand was the main problem. It was a clean sheet in his opening games and he only started to unleash towards the end of his first-round loss at Estoril last week. Against Murray, Thiem was comfortable enough with his wrist to unleash tremendous forehands from the start, but he hits those forehands with significantly less topspin than the vicious, heavy punch at his peak. In that regard, Murray played a solid match and did most things as well as he could have hoped. He kept his unforced errors extremely low against an unpredictable opponent, serving very well under pressure and using his dropshots and delicate lobs to move Thiem from his position well past the baseline. Murray was positive throughout and that performance earned him another day in the tournament to see how far he can push himself. In the midst of his own comeback, it's not often that Murray is the fitter and more physically robust player on the pitch. For Thiem, these early stages of his return have highlighted the task ahead as he is also looking to return to the top of the sport and Murray was the first to acknowledge this as they embraced at net. It'll take a lot of time, but you'll be fine.” Earlier in the day, ninth seed Cameron Norrie advanced to the second round with a narrow 7-5, 7-5 win over Kwon Soonwoo of South Korea.

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Andy Murray wins the first match on clay in five years against Dominic Thiem at the Madrid Open

ANDY MURRAY defeated Dominic Thiem in straight sets in Madrid. (Author: Gardener)

Dominic ThiemAndy Murray won his first match on clay in almost five years when the Ivan Lendl effect had an immediate impact at the Madrid Open on Monday night. He defeated 2020 US Open champion Dominic Thiem in straight sets. The Scot and the Czech-born American announced their third collaboration in March. And after a training camp in Florida, the Scot won his first official match under Lendl against fellow Grand Slam Thiem 6-3, 6-4. Then the world No. 81 added in his on-court interview: "I had in Hardly played on clay in the last five years. I trained on it for four weeks before coming here, so maybe I was more comfortable on it than usual at the start of the clay court season. "I played well. I thought Dominic played well at times but he's obviously just started playing again so he's making a few more mistakes than usual. I didn't hear from Ivan before the game so I hope so for watching.Lendl guided Murray to three Grand Slam titles and world No. 1 earlier in the Scot's career.Murray played his first clay court match in 18 months - and his first time at the event since 2017. And the wildcard hadn't won a match on the red stuff since beating Kei Nishikori in the quarterfinals of the 2017 French Open, suffering a hip injury in his semifinals loss to Stan Wawrinka, which was the start of his long injury struggles 2020 US Open winner Thiem was also on the comeback path as he sought his first win since sustaining a serious right wrist injury last June produced some high-class rallies between two former French Open finalists at the Manolo Santana Stadium before the Austrian's flaky forehand let him down. The world No. 91, playing on a protected rankings list, dropped serve for the first time sailing a long forehand - and he repeated the error at set point. Murray mixed up his game nicely with dropshots and broke again to lead 2-1 in the second set when a Thiem forehand hit the net. The Scot, who turns 35 later this month, saved all three break points on his serve and ended the match with his first match point when Thiem netted a forehand return after an hour and 42 minutes. Murray, who will play the winner of the first-round match between Denis Shapovalov and Ugo Humbert, could face world No. 1 Novak Djokovic in the third round. All five British singles won here in the first round as Cam Norrie defeated world No. 73 Soonwoo Koo 7-5 7-5 with a single break at 5-5 in each set.

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Andy Murray and Rafael Nadal criticize Wimbledon's decision to ban Russian and Belarusian athletes

Wimbledon have banned Russian and Belarusian players from this year's tournament amid the ongoing war in Ukraine (Author: Gardener)

BelarusianAndy Murray and Rafael Nadal speak out against Wimbledon's recent ban on Russian and Belarusian players amid the ongoing war in Ukraine. Speaking to reporters on Sunday ahead of the Madrid Open, Murray said he "doesn't support" excluding players from the competition, but noted that he understood there was no "right answer" to deal with the "difficult" situation . "My understanding of the guidance was that Russians and Belarusians can play if they sign a statement that they are against the war and against the Russian regime," said the British tennis star, 34. "I'm not sure how comfortable I am would feel if something happened to any of the players or their families [as a result of the signing]." "I feel for everyone, I feel for the players who can't play and I don't support either side," added Murray, who is donating all of his prize money to humanitarian aid in Ukraine this season. Nadal also denounced the Wimbledon ban of Russian and Belarusian athletes. "I find it very unfair [to] my Russian tennis buddies, my colleagues," said the Spanish tennis star, 35, during Sunday's press conference. "Let's see what happens in the next few weeks, if the players make a decision on that." Many Ukrainian players have supported the Wimbledon ban, including Sergiy Stakhovsky, who retired earlier this year and joined the Ukrainian army to help out during the war. “Please tell me how fair it is that Ukrainian players cannot return home? How is it fair that Ukrainian children can't play tennis? How is it fair for Ukrainians to die?” RELATED: Novak Djokovic calls Wimbledon ban on Russian, Belarusian players 'crazy': 'I can't support it' Wimbledon officials first announced their decision in a statement in April: 'Given the profile of the championships in the UK and around the world, it is our responsibility to do our part in the widespread effort by government, industry, sporting and creative institutions to limit Russia's global influence by the strongest means." " In the circumstances of such unjustified and unprecedented military aggression, it would be unacceptable for the Russian regime to take any advantage of the participation of Russian or Belarusian players in The Championships," the tournament officials said in a statement. "It is therefore our intention, with deep regret registrations from Russian and Belarusian S players to The Championships 2022.” Despite criticism, officials from the All England Club defended the “agonizing decision” and said the ban was “the only viable option for Wimbledon”. The last time athletes from certain countries were banned from attending Wimbledon was after World War II, when German and Japanese athletes, among others, were banned from playing, according to the New York Times. RELATED: FIFA and UEFA indefinitely suspend all Russian teams ahead of World Cup During a press conference last week, chief executive Sally Bolton cited the club's "responsibility to do our part to limit the possibility of Wimbledon being used to justify the damage done." used to others by the Russian regime." The event, which is one of the four Grand Slam tournaments, would have seen a number of top-ranked Russian and Belarusian players: No. 2 Daniil Medvedev and No. 15 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia, as well as No. 4 Aryna Sabalenka and No. 18 Victoria Azarenka of Belarus Wimbledon is not the only major sporting event to face sanctions over the war in Ukraine Russian and Belarusian athletes are also banned from the upcoming 2022 World Cup, among other major events The Russian attack on Ukraine is a sic h evolving story, and information changes rapidly.

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Andy Murray beats Dominic Thiem in the battle of experienced war horses

The two great champions delivered an entertaining encounter that captured the imagination of the 10,000 or so fans in Madrid (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayMurray in last 32 in Madrid Was it the 'Lendl Effect' we saw in Madrid on Monday as Andy Murray beat Dominic Thiem in straight sets? Murray had not won a clay court match in almost five years, and here he outclassed an expert on the surface - a two-time French Open finalist - in just 102 minutes. Murray had flown to Spain from a four-week training block in Florida with his old mentor Lendl, and there were faint echoes of their finest times together, as he served - hitting nine aces - and forehand with a little more panache and assertiveness than in recent times . But to focus on Murray's performance - impressive as it was - would be telling only half the story. Thiem could be one of the eight active Grand Slam champions on the tour. But he hadn't won a game since May last year, largely due to the wrist injury he sustained over the summer. As Murray conceded afterwards, "He's obviously just started playing again, so he's making a few more mistakes than usual." As a result, the match was a meeting of two scarred and experienced War-steeds. While that anomalous first-round collision of the big winners would have grabbed the headlines on the schedule, no one had any idea what to expect given their various injuries and struggles in form. The big advantage of these two men is that they both master an all-court game, so we saw plenty of net play and a plethora of excellent drop shots. No square centimeter of the red clay was left undisturbed. The draw felt favorable for both men given the names they could have encountered. (Djokovic, Nadal, Alcaraz and Tsitsipas come to mind.) But it proved particularly favorable for Murray, who walked away victorious by a 6-3, 6-4 margin. Thiem has boosted his career after a wrist injury. Thiem - whose career peaked when he beat Alexander Zverev in the New York final two years ago - continued in his usual all-out style, but he just wasn't as accurate as he should have been. He coughed up a steady stream of unforced errors, most of them off his forehand wing. And the timing of those mistakes was also sub-optimal, with the forehand flying long at both critical break points. We shouldn't be surprised that Thiem is slowly recovering from his wrist problems. As he begins his comeback, he is still a long way from his old reliability, which Murray acknowledged with a typically gentlemanly comment as they shook hands at the net. "It's great to see you again," Murray said. It'll take a lot of time, but you'll be fine." Afterwards, Murray told reporters that Thiem's ​​forehand fights reminded him of his own wrist injury in 2007 and that he realized how difficult it was for Thiem to "let go of the wrist" and Get the topspin you need to bring the ball down. Murray had to fend off three break points and also came back from a 0-30 deficit in the deciding game when he served for the opener. That moment brought back memories of Murray's prime as he served back-to-back aces to create a set point - which he duly converted when Thiem fired another long forehand. Murray was never a truly elite server by the standards of Roger Federer or Djokovic. At best, however, he has the ability to find aces when he needs them most. Lendl may not be here in person, but his presence on Murray's support team - even remotely - is still a boost of confidence. Afterwards, Murray admitted with a smile that Lendl hadn't actually spoken to him before the match. “I had really hardly played on clay for the last five years. But I was happy with the way I played. I've been working on that a lot over the past four weeks. It changes the way I play the game.”

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