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Coronavirus infection rates, cases and deaths for all parts of Wales on Friday 18th March

Wales' 7-day infection rate has risen above 300 cases per 100,000 population for the first time since early February (Author: Gardener)

WalesEight more people have died from coronavirus, according to the latest figures from Public Health Wales. New data released on Friday, March 18, covering a 24-hour period, shows 1,935 new positive PCR test results, bringing the total to 837,705. The total number of people who have died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid in Wales is now 7,066. The latest infection rate based on PCR testing for the seven days ended March 13 is 304.5 cases per 100,000 people - up from the 290.7 cases recorded on Thursday. This is the first time the infection rate has surged above 300 since the week of February 6. The infection rate based on PCR tests is only a guide to the spread of Covid in Wales as it does not include lateral flow test results which are reported weekly in Wales. Asymptomatic individuals who test positive on an LFT no longer require a confirmatory PCR test. The latest lateral flow testing data for the week ended March 13 also shows an increase in positive tests. 21,212 positive test results were reported in the past seven days. Headlines from the latest ONS infection survey, published March 18, suggest the percentage of people testing positive for Covid in Wales rose in the week ending March 12. The latest survey estimated that 125,400 people in Wales, equivalent to one in 25 people, had Covid in the week ending March 12. This was more than the 97,900 people reported the week before. The ONS survey found that the Omicron BA.2 variant is now the most widely used in all UK countries. The area of ​​Wales with the highest infection rate (based on PCR testing) for the seven days to March 13 was Blaenau Gwent with 432.3 cases per 100,000 population, followed by Vale of Glamorgan with 384 and Gwynedd with 370.1. Cardiff recorded the most positive cases in the last 24 hours with 244, followed by RCT with 156, Carmarthenshire with 139, Swansea with 127, Caerphilly with 117, Vale of Glamorgan with 114 and Newport with 103. The areas with the lowest new cases reported were Denbighshire at 50, Ceredigion at 28, Merthyr Tydfil at 21 and Anglesey at 19. In the seven days to March 13, a total of 32.6% of PCR tests across Wales returned a positive result - up from the 31 reported on Thursday .9% . The highest rates of positivity were recorded in Gwynedd (38%), Blaenau Gwent (37.8%) and Vale of Glamorgan (37.1%). How do you feel about the current Covid situation in Wales? Seven of these were based at Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB), three at Betsi Cadwaladr UHB, one at Hywel Dda UHB and one at Swansea Bay UHB. Figures being released showing the number of people being treated specifically for Covid rather than testing positive for the virus but who are in hospital for other reasons also show that in-hospital Covid rates are rising. As of March 17, there were 645 patients in acute care hospitals with Covid, 99 of whom were being treated for the condition. 1,927,654 people in Wales have now received their booster shots. Rate of infection for every 100,000 people in each area for the seven days ended March 13: Sarah Crofts, head of analytical results for the COVID-19 infection survey, said of the increase in infections in the latest ONS infection survey: “These The latest numbers show a further increase in infections across most of the UK with high infection rates across the board and Scotland the highest our survey has found. “These increases are largely due to the significant increase in the sub-variant Omicron BA.2. Also of note is that infections have risen across all age groups, with those over 70 reaching their highest estimate since our survey began.” The percentage of LFT tests that returned positive results has increased from 10 in the last week, 88% up to 17.38% The LFT incidence rate was in the range of the Hywel Dda University Health Board with 815.5 positive tests per 100,000 population - well up from the 467.5 in the previous week.The 20 to 39 year old age group recorded the highest incidence rate at 828.4 positive test episodes per 100,000 population First Minister Mark Drakeford has announced all statutory Covid measures in Wales could be lifted by March 28 remains stable, plans for similar measures in Scotland to be extended from March 21 remain stable Scheduled to come into force in March, they have now been postponed due to a surge in Covid cases.

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Leeds boss on the sense of belonging at Elland Road and the influence of Ralf Rangnick

Jesse Marsch tells Sky Sports how he feels at home in Leeds, being mentored by Ralf Rangnick and complete striker Patrick Bamford returning; Watch Wolves vs Leeds live on Sky Sports Premier League from 19:00 on Friday Night Football; Kick-off 8 p.m (Author: Gardener)

Elland RoadIt has been less than three weeks since he took on the immense challenge of replacing Marcelo Bielsa as Leeds head coach and every second counts as he rushes to implement his ideas and stave off looming relegation. In the short interlude between his press conference and this interview with Sky Sports, the 49-year-old hastily uses a member of the club's media team to remind his attacking players to meet him in his office immediately afterwards. After the news was delivered, he claps his hands and takes a seat, ready to face the cameras again before traveling to Wolverhampton for Friday Night Football at Molineux. The schedule is hectic, but Marsch seems like a man in his element. "I'm very clear about how I want to look every day and how that affects how we want our team to look like," he told Sky Sports. “Obviously I learned a lot about what Marcelo did here and the mentality change that I think he helped create. “I need to understand and encourage the balance between discipline and freedom within the environment so players can really thrive and become the best version of themselves, but also know that the commitment to work hard every day and perform is really important is. "I think the players did really well." Marsch has already experienced the full range of emotions at Elland Road, from the dismal 3-0 defeat by Aston Villa - with angry fans singing for his predecessor - and the dramatic 2-1 win over Norwich in just three days. He's also learned a lot about his players; about the "stress" and "anxiety" that held them back, and about the "remarkable" team spirit and determination that now makes them want to shake it off. "I think we're still going to have to deal with stress," he says. "But I think the performance against Norwich showed that the players have let go a little bit of the fear of losing. 'If losing is our biggest fear, then it's best to play fear.' So it was about getting them to use their qualities as young men and their courage." Marsch saw that courage in her reaction to Kenny McLean's late equalizer against Norwich. "I showed in our video session after the game that after the 1-1, we were back after them immediately after kick-off and within three passes we had a dangerous moment." Then after the game we went into that way . It wasn't just the last game, it was the mentality to do everything in a difficult moment to still find a way to influence the game But Leeds are still pushing. Marsch was brought in partly for that reason - he was in touch for several years with director of football Victor Orta, who one day succeeded Bielsa - and is grateful to have inherited a group of players he describes as "modest, hardworking and selfless." "Meeting a group of young men playing in the Premier League and having such a strong character, so much trust in each other and so little selfishness just made an incredible impression on me," he says. That's what I try to be too, so I immediately felt in the right place. "I had the feeling of being with people who think the same way, and I'm very grateful for that." Marsch was different in his last coaching role, most recently at RB Leipzig Sommer after successful stints at Red Bull Salzburg and the New York Red Bulls, however, he left just months later after winning just eight of his 21 games. "The biggest thing I learned in Leipzig was that I don't belong there," he says. I didn't feel fit. I wanted to find a group that I felt like I belonged to, and the feeling I have here didn't deter him. "I'm just trying to come up with energy every day, be positive, have conversations with people, get them to get to know me, get to know everyone else, and then try to have my finger on the pulse, how to approach the project can help move in a direction that I believe can be successful and rewarding." Nonetheless, he looks back on his association with Red Bull's network of clubs as overwhelmingly positive - not least because it's through it that he met Ralf Rangnick, who became him during his time in New York, then hired him as his assistant in Leipzig: "He really helped me understand how you think about football in a very, very detailed way," says Marsch, an explosion of ideas in my head and it rea illy i think gave me the spark to be the coach and the coach that i am now i'm kinda grateful i'm not playing him because i don't know how this one Feeling like a big job in the Premier League mid-season? "I think things are very challenging for every single manager in this league," says Marsch with a grin: "The quality of the league is so good, the games are so good that you have to stand on your own and make sure you're in are able to communicate with your team and help them understand what you want your team and tactics to be. "You'd better be good at your job because it's a big challenge." Marsch, only the third American manager to take a job in the Premier League after Bob Bradley and David Wagner, is hoping to prove his own skills by addressing the defensive weaknesses that have left Leeds their worst defensive record in the season have bestowed on the division. "This is partly due to self-confidence, but also due to the clarity of the role," explains Marsch. "The way I play the game requires all 11 players to be involved at every stage of the game. "So, I think even though we gave up three against Villa and weren't happy with that performance, it has one given A lot of progress has been made in the last two and a half weeks which has brought us closer and closer to a complete team. "You're never quite done, but we're taking steps in the right direction and that's what I've tried to encourage the team to be really hungry about." Leeds fans will be hoping for further evidence of defensive improvement against Wolves on Friday night, but there is already encouragement at the other end of the pitch. Against Leicester and Norwich, Leeds recorded expected goal totals among the highest of the season so far. Patrick Bamford's return to fitness should give them the edge they lacked for much of the season but Marsch is just as excited to see what he can add to their all-around game: "I like his intelligence," he says, "but I like the style and the way he sees the game, fits into the game, makes himself available and combines. "He's a complete striker in many ways, so the more I can help him understand the tactical roles, the more I can help the team understand how to keep playing with him and playing to his strengths. There's always Still an urgency Given the need for points Leeds are only four points above the drop zone, but Marsch's contract runs until 2025 and he too has a long-term vision: "All three goals came from pressing," he says with a smile, "I have a reputation for being good with him working with young players and developing a lot of young players and that's because I love it."We had a mixed training session yesterday and I had a discussion with the 23's and the 18's about the idea I create for the club try, namely to try to integrate all different age groups in such a way that it is possible for everyone to clearly understand what our gaming philosophy should be.” “That's the most important thing to get into young people and games Investing in them and helping them understand how to grow and get better. Marsch knows this from experience having helped Erling Haaland, Karim Adeyemi and many other youngsters succeed at Red Bull Salzburg. At the moment, however, the Friday game has priority. "The long-term goals are taking a back seat at the moment because the focus has to be on preparing the pros every day to achieve results," says Marsch. "But the way I work it's impossible for me to do it alone because I love working in a club to help in every way. "I have to remind myself a little bit more every day to focus on the essentials now. And with that, March is gone. Watch Wolves vs Leeds live on Sky Sports Premier League from 19:00 on Friday Night Football; Kick-off 8 p.m

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Good Friday deal "cannot change," Biden warns at St. Patrick's Day event

The US President passionately advocated protecting the Good Friday Agreement in the ongoing post-Brexit negotiations. (Author: Gardener)

FridayJoe Biden closed Washington's St. Patrick's Day celebrations with an emphatic warning that the Good Friday Agreement "cannot change." At the traditional shamrock ceremony in the White House, Mr Biden made a passionate plea for the Good Friday Agreement to be protected amid ongoing back-and-forth between the UK and EU over post-Brexit Northern Ireland arrangements. US President Joe Biden spoke directly to the ongoing negotiations on the Northern Ireland Protocol and the political instability in the region, while Taoiseach Micheál Martin appeared virtually due to a Covid-positive test. Speaking of Ireland-US relations, he said: "Our nations are both deeply committed to protecting the hard-won gains of peace in Northern Ireland. The Good Friday Agreement has been the foundation of peace and prosperity in Northern Ireland for almost 25 years. Mr Biden said all sides "must continue to resolve challenges in the implementation of the Northern Ireland Protocol". "The United States stands ready to work with all communities in Northern Ireland to ensure its exceptional economic potential and ensure it is realised, and we look forward to supporting the next Northern Ireland executive after the upcoming general election that is on the way. First Minister Paul Givan resigned earlier this year as part of the DUP protest against the Northern Ireland Protocol, a move that also removed Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill from the joint post. "History has proven that when our leaders work together, our leaders can make a difference with the people of Northern Ireland," Mr Biden told the audience at the ceremony. Earlier, Mr Martin spoke of his disappointment at not being able to meet Mr Biden in person on St Patrick's Day after contracting Covid. Mr Martin spoke as it emerged he may have to stay in the US for up to 10 days, although he insisted he would continue working in Washington. Speaking to the media from practically self-isolation, Mr Martin said: “I feel good. "I don't think the gathering was affected in any way. During the virtual meeting earlier in the day, Mr Biden commended the Irish leadership for their handling of the Ukraine crisis. Mr. Biden also reiterated the US government's "unambiguous support" for the Good Friday Agreement. Mr Biden, who identifies deeply with his own Irish heritage, sat next to a traditional shamrock bowl during the bilateral meeting. He quoted Irish poet WB Yeats when describing the impact on the world of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Mr Biden said Irish leadership on the issue had been "striking and impressive". Both leaders condemned the invasion, with the Irish leader speaking of the need for "unity of aims". The couple spoke about the economy, Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement, the war in Ukraine and the undocumented Irish in the US. Mr Martin reiterated the invitation to the President to come to the Republic, with Mr Biden saying he would be happy to visit Ireland again. Mr Biden commended the republic's willingness to take in refugees, adding: "What Ireland is doing now, what you are doing taking in Ukrainian refugees, speak so loud about your principles. The Taoiseach, who practically appeared from Blair House, where he is staying, also thanked Mr. Biden for US support for the Good Friday Agreement. He praised the "steadfast support" and referred to "how important the Good Friday Agreement is for stability and peace on the island of Ireland". He said: "In the last few days that I have been here we have also seen - once again - this two-way, very robust economic relationship between the United States and Ireland." Mr Martin, who is the second due to a positive Covid-19 test year in a row, said it was unfortunate that he and Mr. Biden could not meet face-to-face. "This year we're meeting practically across the street, so we're getting closer," he joked. References to Irish poets dot many of his speeches, with Mr Biden choosing to name-check the late Eavan Boland during a speech at the Ireland Funds gala dinner in Washington on Wednesday night. At the same event, the Taoiseach was informed of the positive Covid-19 result when he was due to speak. Mr. Martin appeared in good spirits during his on-screen appearance. A Dublin Government spokesman said yesterday that the Taoiseach was "feeling good". He said Mr Martin had received a negative Covid test result on Wednesday afternoon but a further test had been carried out when one of his delegation tested positive. This resulted in a positive test for the Taoiseach. Later yesterday, Mr Martin confirmed he will remain in Washington and continue to work while he recovers from Covid. A source said he will be following US Covid-19 guidelines, which could result in no international travel for 10 days. He said: "We had our cabinet meeting, which I chaired from the embassy earlier in the week. I didn't think I'd be holding another cabinet meeting from here next week, but that's the way it is. "I will keep working, we will get through this, and I will be in daily contact with my colleagues and officials, especially in relation to the response to the humanitarian crisis in Ukraine. "I'm going to keep working, I'm feeling good and we're going to take it day by day and step by step." Earlier Thursday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Mr Martin during part of their interaction at the Ireland Funds Gala event didn't wear a mask. She sat next to the Taoiseach just before he was told he had tested positive for Covid-19. Ms Pelosi was about to present Mr Martin with an award but Irish Ambassador Dan Mulhall accepted the award instead and confirmed to guests that Mr Martin had tested positive. "The Taoiseach had a mask on when he sat down but when he started eating he took off the mask and then they called him aside," Ms Pelosi said yesterday. She said she gets tested for Covid "almost every day" and before she sees Mr Biden. "I am very sorry to learn of this news while the Taoiseach has been busy representing Ireland in the United States ahead of our National Day," Higgins said in a statement. "I know this work will continue as he takes the necessary steps following his positive test. “I wish the Taoiseach a speedy recovery and I wish him continued success as he continues his program in Washington and overcome the necessary limitations that come with it. “Sabina joins me in conveying our well wishes to the Taoiseach and his wife, Mary.

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"My family feels far away, but at least they are safe"

“My family feels far away, but at least they are safe” – Last Friday we shared the story of Sasha Bubnovska, who fled Ukraine with her daughters after a harrowing ordeal. Today we speak to the husband she left behind (Author: Gardener)

Last Friday"I suddenly felt very, very alone," Dima Bubnovskyi said as he recalled the heartbreaking moment last Friday when he saw his wife Sasha and their daughters Sofia, 6, and Mia, 2, walking down the street disappeared towards the Polish border. "All my instincts as a father should go with them, but martial law meant something else," he said. "We had spent this intense week together, fleeing the bombs and sleeping on the floors of safe houses, hiding for eight days in the basement of our home in Irpin, which had been under fire from day one - and now we were forced to close it say goodbye to each other. "It's hard to put my feelings into words, but it was like someone took away all the important things in my life. I told my girls that I loved them, that it wouldn't be long before we were together, but inside I felt empty. Dimia, a 29-year-old computer science graduate, couldn't risk returning to Irpin, so he drove to Truskavets, a town 90 km from the border in western Ukraine, where a friend's 80-year-old mother took him in her guest room - and where he is right now. Like all young Ukrainian men, Dima faced immediate conscription into the army, but it hasn't happened yet. "I admit that the thought of fighting at the front is very scary," he said. "Of course I can put a gun in my arms and fight and just die - but I'm worried about my family's future. There are many young men who are eager to fight the Russians, and even for them there are not enough weapons. In the meantime, I feel like I can be more useful to my country by helping keep the economy running. Even our government says that those who can work should, because we need to support our economy and pay taxes, and that's why there are currently many men in western Ukraine who work just like me." But Dima, an IT expert, finds it difficult to concentrate. He admitted: "I really miss my wife and kids and I'm struggling to focus. Last night I had a call with Sasha who told me that Mia cries a lot and really misses me and can't understand why I can't come with her. He also worries about her house and the pets left behind. “The last I heard was six days ago when Sascha's father fled from Irpin and lived somewhere in central Ukraine. By that time, two of the houses on our street had been hit. We have a black labrador called Clode and a cat Lolita that we couldn't take with us because there wasn't room in the car, but Sasha's dad left the keys with a neighbor and I hope he was able to feed them. Dima's parents are divorced, but like his grandparents, they live in Odessa, and for the time being they all stay together. Western Ukraine still feels relatively safe, he said, despite air raid sirens going off "about four times a day." Since his arrival in Truskavets, Dima has hardly been out, apart from going to the store once to stock up on groceries. He said friends saw the article we published, which they shared widely, and he was grateful for it because it was a way to tell them what happened to them and show they were safe. I told Dima how I met Sasha and his brave girls just a few hours after he left them. They recovered briefly from the freezing cold in a mother-child tent run by the Red Cross and Caritas at the Kroscienko border crossing. I also said that we have launched a fundraiser for the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) Ukrainian Humanitarian Appeal, which supports 13 UK charities including the Red Cross, and that together with our sister publication The Independent, we have raised over £300,000 so far . Donate here: Please give what you can to the Evening Standard Ukraine (ES) appeal Sasha, happy to report, was safe and trying to get the girls into some sort of routine after they checked over Krakow Koblentz had traveled to Germany, where she had found a place to stay through a relative. "The West, especially the Poles and the Germans, have been incredibly generous to us," he said. "We will always be grateful to them." He still thinks back to the shock they all felt on the day the war began. “It was Sasha's sister Anastasia's 19th birthday and we had baked her a wonderful cake. It was such a sad and scary way to start her 20th year.” He added: “It has only been 21 days since the start of the war and our morale is high and Russian soldiers' morale is low, so we believe that within the successful negotiations to end the war in the next two months. My family feels far away, but at least they are safe. From a daily news briefing to insights into homes and real estate, plus lifestyle, going out, deals and more.

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A festive feeling

ENTERTAINMENT stakeholders are in a celebratory mood after it was announced that the restrictions... (Author: Gardener)

ENTERTAINMENT stakeholders are in a celebratory mood after it was announced that the restrictions imposed on the industry have now been lifted. Industry players told the Jamaica Observer they are wasting no time and are ready to start events as early as this weekend if possible. “Entertainment and events have opened up around the world. All the major festivals are holding and locally, with the sharp drop in COVID cases, the same thing is happening here and we look forward to entertainment events resuming this weekend as soon as planners can schedule them," said Kamal Bankay , chairman of Dream Entertainment Limited, organizers of the Dream Weekend party series and Director of the Entertainment Advisory Board. Kingston & St Andrew Municipal Corporation (KSAMC) CEO Robert Hill said the company will meet today to discuss how to proceed. "We're only just beginning to see it so we'll be holding a meeting early tomorrow (Friday) to review each area of ​​the Prime Minister's presentation and adjust accordingly. We took some proprietary steps but we wouldn't have known exactly what was going to come out so we took some notes on it to properly inform and adjust and communicate properly with our applicants early next week," he told the Observer . KSAMC's CEO said if there was no misinterpretation of what the PM said, the company should be able to start issuing permits as early as next week. Meanwhile, Michael Ammar Jr., a director of Bacchanal Jamaica - the island's oldest carnival band, said: "For those of us who play by the rules, it's a welcome announcement and yes we are planning Carnival in the summer. He said. "It's smart to lift Disaster Risk Management (DRMA) [Act] rules not just for the entertainment industry, but for everything. Jamaica is now experiencing its lowest level of COVID since the pandemic began. We've also had two waves." , Delta and Omicron [tribes] that have infected quite a lot of people and so they carry natural immunity now and I don't think we can allow a segment of society that chooses not to get vaccinated to go further into the country to blackmail because nothing has happened in this entertainment industry for two years except illegal parties.Similarly, Bankay noted: "The government is doing exactly what it thinks needs to be done based on the current climate for COVID worldwide and particularly in Jamaica. We planned our dream summer weekend and I know Sumfest announced it. We planned it, we sold tickets, we announced it, we ha everything is done and ready to go. We still have a pandemic going on around the world. So if you set aside everything else and meet the 70 percent capacity limit, that's a fair balance." On the production, Main Event Entertainment Group CEO Solomon Sharpe stated, "We've been patient, we've got the deal and the biggest Part of the team held together. The team and our shareholders welcome the return to entertainment life as we know it in Jamaica." On the theater production side, actor, director and playwright David Tulloch said, "I think it's a very good time for the theater community to engage in Get organized and start planning for the rest of the year because it's been a while. It's been two years since we've been literally without the jobs we're used to. A lot of us had to take our hands and make fashion, as we would say here in Jamaica.” It hit us hard because we couldn't staff rooms for an event. I think many of the practitioners are still here; Some have certainly gone but the problem now is that theater is seen as alternative entertainment rather than mainstream entertainment and on that basis it has taken a while of ongoing production to make sure people at least have an idea that Plays are kept on the weekends. What's going to happen now is that we need to go back to a system where we're continually putting out productions so that clients can rebuild their confidence in going to plays," Tulloch continued. Meanwhile Melanie Graham, Marketing Manager and Director of Palace Amusement said: "I am pleased that we are moving in the right direction and hopefully it will do us well. It's been a long time, so we're really looking forward to it. It allows us to have our regular times now which will make a difference and we're getting closer to summer so I'm hoping for exciting things. People need to be safe and feel safe coming into a closed environment and I'm not sure how long that will take. I know there are some people who really want to get out, but there are a lot of people who are still nervous. Planning for the summer is looking good, but much of it is not in our hands and we only pray that there will be no further problems on this very long and arduous journey.” Copyright © 2012 Jamaica Observer.

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Good Friday deal "cannot change," Biden warns at St. Patrick's Day event

The US President passionately advocated protecting the Good Friday Agreement in the ongoing post-Brexit negotiations. (Author: Gardener)

FridayJoe Biden has concluded Washington's St. Patrick's Day celebrations with a strong warning that the Good Friday Agreement "cannot change." Joe Biden has concluded Washington's St. Patrick's Day celebrations with a strong warning that the Good Friday Agreement "cannot change." At the traditional shamrock ceremony in the White House, Mr Biden made a passionate plea for the Good Friday Agreement to be protected amid ongoing back-and-forth between the UK and EU over post-Brexit Northern Ireland arrangements. At the traditional shamrock ceremony in the White House, Mr Biden made a passionate plea for the Good Friday Agreement to be protected amid ongoing back-and-forth between the UK and EU over post-Brexit Northern Ireland arrangements. US President Joe Biden spoke directly to the ongoing negotiations on the Northern Ireland Protocol and the political instability in the region, while Taoiseach Micheal Martin appeared virtually due to a Covid-positive test. Speaking of Ireland-US relations, he said: "Our nations are both deeply committed to protecting the hard-won gains of peace in Northern Ireland. The Good Friday Agreement has been the foundation of peace and prosperity in Northern Ireland for almost 25 years. Mr Biden said all sides "must continue to resolve challenges in the implementation of the Northern Ireland Protocol". "The United States stands ready to work with all communities in Northern Ireland to ensure its exceptional economic potential and ensure it is realised, and we look forward to supporting the next Northern Ireland executive after the upcoming general election that is on the way. ” These elections are taking place in May, at a time of considerable uncertainty about the future direction of politics in Northern Ireland. "History has proven that when our leaders work together, our leaders can make a difference with the people of Northern Ireland," Mr Biden told the audience at the ceremony. Earlier, Mr Martin spoke of his disappointment at not being able to meet Mr Biden in person on St Patrick's Day after contracting Covid. Mr Martin spoke as it emerged he may have to stay in the US for up to 10 days, although he insisted he would continue working in Washington. Speaking to the media from practically self-isolation, Mr Martin said: “I feel good. "I don't think the gathering was affected in any way. During the virtual meeting earlier in the day, Mr Biden commended the Irish leadership for their handling of the Ukraine crisis. Mr. Biden also reiterated the US government's "unambiguous support" for the Good Friday Agreement. Mr Biden, who identifies deeply with his own Irish heritage, sat next to a traditional shamrock bowl during the bilateral meeting. He quoted Irish poet WB Yeats when describing the impact on the world of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Mr Biden said Irish leadership on the issue had been "striking and impressive". Both leaders condemned the invasion, with the Irish leader speaking of the need for "unity of aims". The couple spoke about the economy, Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement, the war in Ukraine and the undocumented Irish in the US. Mr Martin reiterated the invitation for the President to come to Ireland, with Mr Biden saying he would be happy to visit Ireland again. Mr Biden commended Ireland's willingness to take in refugees, adding: 'What Ireland is doing now, what you are doing taking in Ukrainian refugees, speak so loud about your principles. The Irish Prime Minister, who practically appeared from Blair House, where he is staying, also thanked Mr Biden for US support for the Good Friday Agreement. He praised the "steadfast support" and referred to "how important the Good Friday Agreement is for stability and peace on the island of Ireland". He said: "In the last few days that I have been here we have also seen - once again - this two-way, very robust economic relationship between the United States and Ireland." Mr Martin, who is the second due to a positive Covid-19 test year in a row, said it was unfortunate that he and Mr. Biden could not meet face-to-face. "This year we're meeting practically across the street, so we're getting closer," he joked. References to Irish poets dot many of his speeches, with Mr Biden choosing to name-check the late Eavan Boland during a speech at the Ireland Funds gala dinner in Washington on Wednesday night. At the same event, the Taoiseach was informed of the positive Covid-19 result when he was due to speak. Mr. Martin appeared in good spirits during his on-screen appearance. A spokesman for the Irish government said earlier Thursday that the Taoiseach was "feeling good". He said Mr Martin had received a negative Covid test result on Wednesday afternoon but a further test had been carried out when one of his delegation tested positive. This resulted in a positive test for the Taoiseach. Later on Thursday, Mr Martin confirmed he will remain in Washington and continue working while he recovers from Covid. A source said he will be following US Covid-19 guidelines, which could result in no international travel for 10 days. He said: "We had our cabinet meeting, which I chaired from the embassy earlier in the week. I didn't think I'd be holding another cabinet meeting from here next week, but that's the way it is. "I will keep working, we will get through this, and I will be in daily contact with my colleagues and officials, especially in relation to the response to the humanitarian crisis in Ukraine. "I'm going to keep working, I'm feeling good and we're going to take it day by day and step by step." Earlier Thursday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Mr Martin during part of their interaction at the Ireland Funds Gala event didn't wear a mask. She sat next to the Taoiseach just before he was told he had tested positive for Covid-19. Ms Pelosi was about to present Mr Martin with an award but Irish Ambassador Dan Mulhall accepted the award instead and confirmed to guests that Mr Martin had tested positive. "The Taoiseach had a mask on when he sat down, but when he started eating, he took off the mask and then they called him aside," Ms Pelosi said Thursday. She said she gets tested for Covid "almost every day" and before she sees Mr Biden. Meanwhile, Irish President Michael D Higgins sent his "good wishes" to Mr Martin. "I am very sorry to learn of this news while the Taoiseach has been busy representing Ireland in the United States ahead of our National Day," Higgins said in a statement. "I know this work will continue as he takes the necessary steps following his positive test.

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Ukrainian MP Lesia Vasylenko at the panel

Joining Vasylenko and presenter Fiona Bruce are Conservative MP Suella Braverman, Labor MP Wes Streeting, Saturday Live co-host Reverend Richard Coles and Sir Max Hastings. (Author: Gardener)

UkrainianBBC flagship political debate show Question Time returns on Thursday evening, live from Kettering in Northamptonshire. Presenter Fiona Bruce is joined by a studio audience and a panel of politicians and journalists. Ukrainian MP Lesia Vasylenko, Conservative MP Suella Braverman, Labor MP Wes Streeting, former Communard and broadcaster Reverend Richard Coles and historian Sir Max Hastings all sit on the podium. The war in Ukraine is high on the agenda and will certainly cause a lot of discussion.

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Ex-Danish PM refutes claim Britain is leading anti-Russia effort

Nadhim Zahawi's reaction is priceless as Helle Thorning-Schmidt tells him she "almost chuckled" on hearing his remarks. (Author: Gardener)

Ex-Danish PMThorning-Schmidt, who was Prime Minister of Denmark between 2011 and 2015, said: "You said something that almost made me laugh when you said that Putin will think Britain is leading the effort against Russia at the moment. “Of course it isn't, the European Union is leading the effort against Russia. I don't think they're going to see Boris Johnson as a particular leader in this area, so get that straight.” When Zahawi said “it should be a team effort,” Thorning-Schmidt replied, “You said Russia will be the united Kingdom as leaders, I don't know why they would do that."

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BBC hit by complaints about Katie Price's What Harvey Did Next documentary

The BBC has been inundated with complaints to Ofcom. (Author: Gardener)

BBCThe BBC has been hit by hundreds of complaints from angry fans after Katie Price aired the documentary 'What Harvey Did Next'. The BBC has been inundated with complaints to Ofcom. A total of 103 complaints related to the documentary were filed, it said. Cecilia fumed: "Good to see tonight's #Question Time is back on the #BBC where it should be on Thursday night. Last week I was outraged when it was replaced with a documentary about the criminal #KatiePrice. Can someone from the BBC please explain why did you do that??! #bbcqt ” LJ raged: “Katie Price has had to give up her animals for shelter, the children's fathers temporarily looking after them full time and putting themselves in order. It's so obvious that she has a lot of problems with the @. BBC documentary. She really should be in jail..." READ MORE Britain braces for hottest day of year so far as Met Office forecasts 18C heat Kev Steel furious: 'Scrap the TV licence. Why is the BBC paying Katie Price to broadcast? "She should be jailed for drunk driving. Thousands of pounds. Worst thing about British society. Debt thousands. Get her off the BBC. The BBC using our royalties to line Katie Price's pockets is bizarre. "Seriously, why am i paying for a tv license i just got on bbc 1 and a katie prizes documentary is on.

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Danish ex-PM scoffs at claims Britain is 'leader' on Russia

In BBC Question Time, Helle Thorning-Schmidt rejects Tory Minister Nadhim Zahawi's proposal. (Author: Gardener)

ex-PMDuring a special BBC Question Time session on the war in Ukraine, Helle Thorning-Schmidt took offense at remarks made by Nadhim Zahawi, the Minister for Education. Responding to a question on the refugee crisis, Zahawi said that Russia "views the UK as a leader in coordination efforts" and began referring to the supply of defense weapons to Ukraine and the imposition of punitive sanctions on Vladimir Putin's regime . In recent days, the UK's handling of Ukrainian refugees has been heavily criticized and compared unfavorably to the European Union's response. The UK government has insisted that displaced Ukrainians be given visas first, meaning some are stuck in France and unable to enter the UK. In contrast, the EU has agreed to grant temporary residency permits to Ukrainians fleeing the invasion, giving them access to employment, social assistance and housing for up to three years. While hundreds of thousands poured into wider Europe, Ukrainians were granted only 760 visas to enter the UK. Thorning-Schmidt, who was Danish Prime Minister between 2011 and 2015 and is married to Labor MP Stephen Kinnock, said: "You said something that almost made me laugh when you said that Putin will think that Britain's effort leading against Russia at the moment . “Of course it isn't, the European Union is leading the effort against Russia. When Zahawi said "it should be a team effort," Thorning-Schmidt replied, "They said Russia will see the UK as the leader, I don't know why they would do that."

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