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How long can he continue like this after being eliminated from the Australian Open?

The question is how much longer Andy Murray can do this to himself. (Author: Gardener)

Australian* Daniel, 28, reaches the third round of the Slam for the first time in his career The question is how much longer Andy Murray can keep doing this to himself. He had tried everything to prepare his battered body for this Australian Open and yet it all unraveled in just his second match with a straight-set loss to Taro Daniel, a Japanese qualifier who qualified for the third round in the 17th attempt had qualified for a slam . It's his way of tempering disappointment at this second coming with fatalistic humor. He's used to his kids telling him whenever he comes home early from tournaments, "Dad lost another tennis match." But this latest setback will cut deeper than most. At last summer's Wimbledon, Murray was heartbroken after being crushed by Denis Shapovalov. Daniel arrived here as the ultimate Tour walker, world No. 120, the kind of opponent Peak Murray could have finished off in third gear. Daniel even claimed he was cramping in the third set, but Murray, a five-time Australian Open finalist, still couldn't stop him. "I put a lot into the off-season, training and preparing not to play like that in the big tournaments." His comeback from hip surgery was more of a series of isolated moments: an unlikely Tour title in Antwerp in 2019, a few cathartic ones Late-night victories at Wimbledon and a four-hour nostalgia trip in Melbourne this week to defeat world No. 22 Nikoloz Basilashvili. He then spoke of his pride at still being able to beat players with such a pedigree. Daniel is the lowest-ranked player he's ever lost to at a major.

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Verdict on Andy Murray - Post-game comments cast huge doubts over his future

Murray found no answers in the second round of the Australian Open against Japan's Taro Daniel. (Author: Gardener)

Andy Murray - PostTime and time again, in the first week of Grand Slam events, Murray found a way to navigate himself out of holes he often made against lower-ranked opponents. However, he found no answers against Japan's Taro Daniel in the second round of the Australian Open and it was the manner of his 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 defeat that will hurt the most. Coming back from hip surgery to playing singles at the highest level has likely always been difficult for Murray and while he has shown brilliant spots on the pitch over the past six months, the enduring consistency he needs is what he needs to see a string of games to win, did not come . He would have hoped that would change in Melbourne as after a run to the finals of the ATP event in Sydney he then beat Nikoloz Basilashvili to bolster the belief he was back close to his best. It was always questionable whether Murray could handle the physical demands of back-to-back matches in best-of-five set events, but his loss to Daniel didn't appear to be due to stamina exhaustion. This was the story of one of the game's greats who lost some of the punch that previously allowed him to blast through opponents like Daniel, but this time lacked that momentum. The struggle was there, it always will be, but finding the killing blows when he needed them most proved to be beyond Murray and his post-game comments confirmed he needs more than that to justify, that he is extending his career too long. When asked if he plans to be back in Melbourne next year, Murray said: "I mean, yes. But not if I do what I did tonight too often this season. “This is a really important year for me for a number of reasons and I want to do well in the big events. For me, tonight is not good enough in that regard. It depends on how I cope with the results this year and how I do in the big events.” The comments left little to the imagination and although Murray has fought harder than most to come back after three years returning to the draw at the Australian Open, he hasn't put in all the hard work of losing to players of Daniel's caliber on his road to recovery. This isn't the end of Andy Murray's story, but it could be the beginning of his final chapter unless he finds a way to turn optimism into real success over an extended period of time. The article Andy Murray Verdict - Post-match comments cast serious doubts about his future first appeared on Tennis365.com.

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Andy Murray crashes into world No. 120 Taro Daniel at the Australian Open

Andy Murray's Australian Open campaign ends in second round. (Author: Gardener)

AustralianAndy Murray's Australian Open campaign ended in the second round (Image: Quinn Rooney/Getty Images) Andy Murray is eliminated from the Australian Open after winning his second round match in straight sets against world No. 120 Taro Daniel , had lost. The Japanese qualifier pulled off a convincing 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 win over the former British No. 1 to reach the third round of a Grand Slam for the first time in his career. This was Murray's first second-round appearance at the Australian Open since 2017, when he reached the fourth round, but as he continues to find a way back to the top of men's tennis from injuries, a tough match against Daniel proved a step too far . After his epic five-set win over Nikoloz Basilashvili, which lasted nearly four hours, Murray spoke of his desire to finish matches more efficiently, but it seems Daniel didn't get the memo - breaking the jock in the third game that lasted almost 14 minutes. Japan's Taro Daniel caused quite a stir when he defeated Andy Murray in straight sets (Image: Getty) Murray broke back in the sixth set but was unable to continue at love as the qualifier proved from the start he was ready to go the distance. Daniel was quick on his feet and rarely made a mistake in his decision making. The 28-year-old was now on a 10-set winning streak after not dropping a set in qualifying and looked rather unfazed. While Murray's shots lacked conviction and he missed the baseline, Daniel's shots landed in both corners of the court and he broke his opponent again in the third game of the second set. He delivered his best tennis of the match early in the third set, but Daniel still found an answer and only improved his game. With two big serves in the seventh game, Murray was leading 4-3 as he roared at the crowd and they sensed the 34-year-old wasn't dead and buried yet. But while Murray's legs looked heavy on the court on some of the longer rallies, Daniel still had a springy stride and it proved crucial at key moments when the veteran was broken again, giving Daniel an opportunity to serve for the match.

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Andy Murray wants to do more than make second rounds of Slam after a "tough" defeat

The three-time Grand Slam champion was beaten 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 at Melbourne Park. (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayAndy Murray's thoughts once again turned to his future in tennis amid disappointment at a second-round loss to qualifier Taro Daniel at the Australian Open. At 120 in the world, the Japanese is the lowest-ranked player Murray has ever lost to in a Grand Slam and he made no attempt to hide how much it hurt after going 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 had gone down. "I'm really, really disappointed," Murray said. Despite all the big moments like his five-set win over Nikoloz Basilashvili in the first round on Tuesday, Murray is keen to challenge again in the final stages of the Slam and this has been a disheartening reality check. The 34-year-old questioned his future after losing badly in the third round at Wimbledon last year and it was his concern again here. When asked if he plans to be back in Melbourne next year, Murray said: "I mean, yes. But not if I do what I did tonight too often this season. “This is a really important year for me for a number of reasons and I want to do well in the big events. For me, tonight is not good enough in that regard. "I don't find it particularly motivating to do second slam rounds. It depends on how I handle the results this year and how I do in the big events.” Hopes were high that Murray could have another strong run in Melbourne three years after his career ended. Daniel had won just five games over three sets in their only previous Davis Cup encounter in 2016, but Murray, whose heavy workload included reaching the final of the ATP Tour event in Sydney over the weekend, started sluggishly and failed to turn the tide turn in his favor. He had never lost in a slam to a player ranked outside the top 100, with then-world No. 91 Arnaud Clement being the lowest in the second round of the US Open in 2005. At 28, Daniel has spent much of his career hovering around the 100 mark, but it's an indication of the depth of the game that he's an extremely solid and capable player, and is deceptively quick on the pitch. Murray said: "I made far too many mistakes today. There might be a few reasons for that, but he was solid throughout the match. After losing serve twice in the opening set, Murray saw four break points come and go in the second game of the second set - the Scot won just two of 11 in the match - and again it was Daniel who found the big moments. Murray finally went forward early in the third but immediately gave up his advantage and the end was near when Daniel broke to lead 5-4. Murray received a warning for banging his racquet on the court in anger, and Daniel grabbed his second match point to advance to the third round of a slam for the first time.

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Will Andy Murray now have the motivation to continue?

We have stayed here with Andy Murray before and wondered if he will leave the Australian Open never to return. So perhaps one shouldn't read too much into his apparent despondency. (Author: Gardener)

Will Andy MurrayWe have stayed here with Andy Murray before and wondered if he will leave the Australian Open never to return. So perhaps not too much should be read into his apparent despondency after his worst Grand Slam defeat by ranking. His loss - 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 - to Japanese qualifier Taro Daniel meant Dan Evans was the last British singles player standing in the third round. The two-time Wimbledon champion appeared to have suffered a mental and physical flop after his rousing first-round win over 21st seed Nikoloz Basilashvili. It is proving increasingly difficult to secure the tantalizing glimpse of the old Murray, who reached the final in Sydney last weekend. So much so that if there were too many repeats of it in 2022, he wondered if he would have the motivation to keep going. The lightning-fast Daniel played well above his world 120 ranking, but Murray has never lost to anyone low before in a major. When asked if he would be back in Melbourne, he said yes, but added: "Not if I do what I did tonight too often this season." The Scot has already helped this year to improve his ranking, and is at a higher level than his world No. 113 suggests. Still, he's still only on the cusp of the top 100 and needs wildcards to avoid going through most weeks' qualifying loop. Since returning to Queen's last summer, he has relied on wildcard entries to put him in 14 of 16 tournaments. "I want to do well in the big events," Murray said. "I don't find doing the second round of slams particularly motivating. So it depends on how I deal with the results this year and how I do in the big events. I'm not sure I've ever lost a match against someone ranked outside 100 in a slam. So it's not a big loss in that regard.” One consolation is that he's going through technical changes and using a bigger clubhead. "I recently changed racquets," he said. He now plans to rest before heading to the Middle East for ATP events next month. Before leaving, he contributed to the debate over whether Melbourne players can really be relied on to self-test for Covid in Melbourne, with suspicion some will skip the procedure for fear of resignation. It seems an optimistic scenario that non-symptomatic players risk being locked out mid-tournament without their status being independently verified. "I think the responsibility is on the players to test themselves," Murray said. Earlier, Evans fell through in round three when his French opponent Arthur Rinderknech retired with a wrist injury. Like last year in Melbourne, there is one GB player left in the third round, with Evans taking over from Cam Norrie. Their only previous meeting came in the final of the warm-up event in Melbourne last year when Evans won 6-2, 6-3. His singles status is something of a reality check for British tennis at the start of the season following the heady events of 2021. Meanwhile, Tennis Australia boss Craig Tiley emerged and said he was over the Novak Djokovic affair not going to resign, but he offered no explanation for his part in what was going on in the tournament setup.

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Andy Murray crashes against Japan's Taro Daniel at the Australian Open

Andy Murray was eliminated at the Australian Open in the second round by a set loss to Japanese qualifier Taro Daniel, who won the Melbourne clash 6-4 6-4 6-4. (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayWe have stayed here with Andy Murray before and wondered if he will leave the Australian Open never to return. So perhaps not too much should be read into his apparent despondency after his worst Grand Slam defeat by ranking. His 4-6, 4-6, 4-6 loss to Japanese qualifier Taro Daniel meant Dan Evans was the last British singles player standing in the third round. The two-time Wimbledon champion appeared to have suffered a mental and physical flop after his rousing first-round win over 21st seed Nikoloz Basilashvili. It's proving increasingly difficult to pin all the tantalizing looks on old Murray, who reached the final in Sydney last weekend. Lightning-fast Daniel played well above his official list of 120 in the world, but Murray has never lost to someone so low in a major before. When asked if he would be back in Melbourne, he said yes, but added: "Not if I do what I did tonight too often this season." Murray has already helped improve his ranking situation this year and is at a higher level than his current number suggests. Still, he's still only on the cusp of the top 100 and needs wildcards to avoid going through most weeks' qualifying loop. The fact is that since his return to the Queen's last summer he has relied on wild card entries to get him into fourteen of the sixteen tournaments he has competed in. His goals are higher: “I want to do well at the big events. For me, tonight isn't good enough in that regard," he said. "I don't find it particularly motivating to make it through the second round of the Slams. So it depends on how I deal with the results this year and how I do in the big events. I'm not sure I've ever lost a match against someone ranked outside 100 in a slam. One consolation is that he's undergoing technical changes and using a larger racquet head. That's no excuse for losing today, but I might have to factor that into my performances for a few months, too," he said. He now plans to rest before heading to the Middle East for ATP events next month. Before leaving, he contributed to the debate over whether Melbourne players can really be relied on to self-test for Covid in Melbourne, with suspicion some will skip the procedure for fear of resignation. It seems a very optimistic scenario that non-symptomatic players risk being locked out mid-tournament without their status being independently verified. “I think the responsibility lies with the players to test themselves. And yes, some will, and unfortunately others won't," Murray said. Earlier, Evans had received a walkthrough to the third round when his French opponent Arthur Rinderknech retired due to a wrist injury. Like last year in Melbourne, there is one GB player left in the third round, with Evans taking over from Cam Norrie. Their only previous meeting came in the final of the warm-up event in Melbourne last year when Evans won 6-2, 6-3. His lonely status in singles is something of a reality check for British tennis early in the season after the heady events of 2021. SAM BLITZ was on the live blog for coverage or Andy Murray vs Taro Daniel...

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Andy Murray's retirement is somewhere on the horizon

The former world No. 1 says reaching the second round of the Grand Slams "doesn't motivate him" and a lack of improvement at the Australian Open would make him think about his future in the game (Author: Gardener)

Andy Murray'sAfter pocketing the winning volley, Taro vigorously shook Daniel's hand as if he'd accidentally touched something hot. Indeed he had: form more than good enough to derail Andy Murray's recent attempt to return to the second week of a Grand Slam. We are approaching the fifth year since Murray limped out of the Wimbledon quarter-finals, beaten well by Sam Querrey and almost used his racquet as a crutch because of the pain in his hip. It remains the last time the former world No. 1 has been in the last eight in a Major. There has been a lot of water under the bridge since then, with two well-documented hip surgeries and a return to title-winning ways (Antwerp 2019) that many thought impossible after he had a metal joint put in. However, Murray didn't do it himself through years of rehabilitation to make up the numbers and win the odd minor title. The resilience of that confidence will be tested again on the flight home from Melbourne as he reflects on defeat by Daniel, the first player outside the top 100 to ever defeat him in a Grand Slam. It's hard to say what will worry Murray more: the facts of the loss or the manner. "I made far too many mistakes today," he said. [It's a] hard loss for me.” Is he already planning a return to Australia? This is a really important year for me for a number of reasons and I want to do well in the big events," added Murray. “For me, tonight is not good enough in that regard. I don't find it particularly motivating to do a second round of slams. I want to do better. [So it] depends on how I progress this year in terms of results and how I do in the big events.” At the moment there is no doubt about his passion or commitment to the cause. When he beat Oscar Otte at Wimbledon last summer, he roared in the crowd's face after practically every point, and even when he slipped the match against Daniel, he found a saltire in the crowd and shared a war cry with Porter. In the quiet moments and the hours and days after the defeat, he wonders if it was all really worth it. Murray is now a father of four and this was his first trip to Australia since 2019 - and this week he was able to keep a friendly face on a video call as his family was battling an illness in the UK. "Of course, if that's the case, you also want to be there to help and feel like you're contributing," Murray said. "It's harder to leave the house knowing you have four kids than it was when I was in my mid-20s. Leaving family is hard. "I'd rather not be away from my family for five, six weeks at a time, but I still love to compete and play tennis. Murray will now return to the UK for a few weeks before flying to the Middle East for tournaments in Doha and Dubai in February, where results will be important but not decisive; it remains the Grand Slams where he wants to excel the most. The 34-year-old wouldn't rely on the precise goals that determine whether he continues beyond this year, although he reckoned it would be wildly choppy if he didn't make it through the second round by one or two more of his appearance in Australia . “Obviously if I lose in the second round of a slam and lose to Djokovic in five sets or so, that's a different situation. I'm not seeded, I'm far from it, which makes things difficult in terms of [the draw]," Muray added. "Again, the leaderboards aren't something that motivate me, but as you move up the leaderboards and get seeded in tournaments, you have an opportunity to work your way into a tournament a bit." It's true that Murray's draws - five of his last six first-round Slams matches were against Seed - unfriendly, but his standards are unfailingly high and currently there are more than just 32 players good enough to beat him. "I'm not sure I've ever lost a match in a slam to someone who finished outside of 100," Murray said. "In that respect, it's not a big loss for me." Murray won't tolerate that.

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The former world No. 1 suffers a surprise loss at the Australian Open to qualifier Taro Daniel

Andy Murray's hopes of a deep run at this year's Australian Open were ended in straight sets by Japanese qualifier Taro Daniel on Thursday in Melbourne. (Author: Gardener)

Taro DanielAndy Murray's hopes of a deep run at this year's Australian Open were ended in straight sets by Japanese qualifier Taro Daniel on Thursday in Melbourne. Murray struggled for sharpness against a tough and agile opponent in world No. 120 Daniel, suffering a surprise 6-4, 6-4, 6-4 defeat. Murray cut a dejected figure in his post-game press conference, saying: "I'm really, really disappointed. When asked if he wants to be back in Melbourne next year, Murray said: "I mean, yes. But not if I do what I did tonight too often this season. “This is a really important year for me for a number of reasons and I want to do well in the big events. For me, tonight is not good enough in that regard. "I don't find it particularly motivating to reach second Slam rounds. It depends on how I handle the results this year and how I fare in the big events Opponents in Daniel The Japanese qualifier took just five games in three sets from Murray in their only previous Davis Cup clash in 2016, but Murray, whose heavy workload included reaching the final of the ATP Tour event in Sydney over the weekend, started sluggishly and was unable to turn the tide in his favor. He had never lost in a Grand Slam to a player outside the Top 100 finish with Arnaud Clement, then world No. 91, last in the second round of the US Open in 2005. Murray failed to pierce his opponent in the first set and despite earning an early break Daniel quickly clinched another .In the second game of the second set, four break points came and went - Murray won just two of 11 of the slush h - and again it was Daniel who got in found the answers in the big moments. Murray finally went forward early in the third but immediately gave up his advantage before Daniel broke to lead 5-4. Murray received a warning for angrily smacking his racquet on the court and Daniel grabbed his second match point to advance to the third round of a Grand Slam for the first time. Dan Evans received a free pass into the third round when his opponent Arthur Rinderknech withdrew. Evans was due to face the Frenchman at Melbourne Park on Thursday but was awarded a free-kick before the game started. Rinderknech's retirement due to a wrist injury means Evans, who easily defeated David Goffin in round one, is in the last 32 in Melbourne for the first time since 2017, when he reached the fourth round at a Grand Slam for the first time. British No. 2 Heather Watson was narrowly beaten by Tamara Zidansek, who is seeded 29th, 7:6 (7:4) and 4:6. Watson lost a very close match to Zidansek in Adelaide last week and again there was little choice between the two but the Slovenian was a little more solid in the big moments. Watson fought back twice after breaking down in the opening set and had a set point of 5-6 but Zidansek saved him, hit a strong tie break and then broke Watson's serve twice in a row to take the win. "I've been happy with my performance, my fight and my focus," said Watson, who has moved her training base to the Bolton Arena while boyfriend Courtney Duffus plays football for Morecambe. I want to keep working hard, staying fit and looking forward to this year."

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Andy Murray doubts future after crashing into qualifiers at Australian Open

Downbeat Murray is refusing to give any guarantees he will be back in Melbourne next year after losing in straight sets to world No. 120 (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayAndy Murray has expressed doubts about his competitive future after a straight set loss in the second round at the Australian Open to Japanese qualifier Taro Daniel, the worst result of his Grand Slam career. A picture of dejection as he reflected on a 4-6, 4-6, 4-6 loss to world no. 120, he said: "A performance like that is something I don't find motivating at this stage." At 34, Murray, a five-time finalist here at Melbourne Park, refused to offer any guarantees that he would be back for his 14th attempt at the event next year. A first loss at this level against a player outside the top 100, he conceded, was not an experience he wanted to repeat. When asked if he would be sure to return in 12 months, Murray replied: "Not if I do what I did tonight too many times this season. I don't find it particularly motivating to make the second round of the slam. It's not the first time during Murray's comeback from major hip surgery that he's made a grim prognosis about his appetite to continue as a follower. But where he could explain that result on the basis of the Canadian's high seeding, he struggled to accept being outclassed by Daniel, a player who had never reached the third round of a slam before. It's a tough loss for me, that's for sure. I've never lost in a slam to anyone outside of 100. Murray lamented the fact that he still had to rely on wildcards for majors, risking encounters with seeded opponents in the early round, and admitted he was desperate to improve his own ranking of 113th. Taro Daniel has reached the third round of a Grand Slam for the first time “I'm not seeded right now – I'm far from that, which makes things difficult. I've played against [Nikoloz] Basilashvili a few times and against Stefanos [Tsitsipas] at the US Open and that makes it a challenge. As you move up the rankings you have an opportunity to work your way into a tournament so you don't have to come out straight away and play really well.” His efforts against Daniel nullified the progress he had shown 48 hours earlier when he defeated Basilashvili for the third time in six months. Murray's return to that point was not without sacrifice, as his hip replacement coincided with the responsibility of raising four children. He was emotional after this month's Sydney final when referring to his family and here described how the prolonged absences were taking a psychological toll. "I'd rather not be away from my family for five, six weeks at a time, but I still love to compete and play tennis," said Murray, who has no concrete plans about next month's hard court tournaments in Doha and Dubai made out . My family was a little sick last week. If that's the case, you too want to be there to help and feel like you're contributing.

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Emma Raducanu and Andy Murray left the Australian Open with conflicting prospects after early exits

While Raducanu struggled through blisters to take positives from their loss to Danka Kovinic, Murray lamented his own performance and questioned his future after a tame loss to qualifier Taro Daniel (Author: Gardener)

Emma RaducanuIt ended with both Emma Raducanu and Andy Murray being eliminated in the second round, with one showing admirable combat and fighting spirit to rage against an early elimination and the other wondering if they have enough left to continue. While Raducanu's first Grand Slam since her remarkable triumph at the US Open is over sooner than many might have expected, he doesn't tell the full story of a wild night out in Melbourne, during which she not only faced Danka Kovinic, but also filled a painful spot Blisters on her right hand. It forced Raducanu to change her game plan and robbed her of her right-handed forehand's explosive weapon, but she didn't let the situation get the best of her. Instead, it sparked a remarkable comeback from the 19-year-old as he fought back from a straight-set loss and forced a decisive set while hacking away with a forehand slice. Raducanu has the ability to catch fire from the first point, but in Melbourne she has also faced the challenge of having the momentum suddenly swing in the opposite direction, one of several lessons she learned from only her third Grand Slam appearance will pull. Kovinic's five-game run in the opening set created tension and strain that was exacerbated by growing concern from Raducanu's right-hand man. Grimacing in pain, Raducanu struggled to break back in the ninth game of set number two before securing two more break points while holding serve. In that regard, there are similarities between her win here and some of the surprise surprises Raducanu experienced as she sped through the US Open last September. Despite being somewhat separated in terms of age, the 27-year-old has enjoyed the biggest win of her career, beating a Grand Slam champion and becoming the first player from Montenegro to reach the third round of a Major. She still has many more Australian Opens to look forward to in the future - a realization that dawned when Murray began to express doubts about himself. After the magic of his epic first-round win over Nikoloz Basilashvili, the 34-year-old's hopes for a good run at the Australian Open came crashing down to earth with a tame straight-set loss to wildcard Taro Daniel. Murray had been asked ahead of the game how his team were working to finish games faster after being brought to five sets by Basilashvili. Instead, Daniel pulled off a 6-4 6-4 6-4 win that showed all the efficiency and control Murray was looking for in his own game. Andy Murray is yet to get through the third round since returning to the Grand Slams (EPA). Murray will not give up the fight after that loss but his post-game comments showed just how disappointed he was with his own performance. It's been as flat and sluggish as the former world No. 1 has been since her return to the Grand Slams. Daniel was largely flawless and stayed patient to outlast Murray in the long rallies as the 34-year-old's mistakes piled up. The passivity of Murray's portrayal seemed to be his frustration as he later suggested he would not return to the Australian Open next year unless he was able to produce the performances required. While Murray's exit felt timid, Nick Kyrgios went out kicking and screaming as he threatened to collapse the roof of the Rod Laver Arena, dragging tournament favorite Daniil Medvedev into one of the wildest matches at this or any Australian Open. An inspired performance from Kyrgios in the third set in front of a vociferous home crowd opened up the possibility of an exciting comeback, but Medvedev kept his head to silence the boos, jeers and siuuus that came his way at 7-6 6- 4 4-6 6-2 win. It was always a box office match, one that took place while Murray and Raducanu were both also on the pitch, and once again showed how exciting a player Kyrgios can be when he's in the mood. It also led to frustration that Kyrgios didn't offer this enough and the 26-year-old wasn't able to bring his skills and personality together to fulfill his potential and produce those opportunities more regularly. Medvedev took on the Australian Open crowd (AFP via Getty) The US Open champion kept his head in an environment where many, including a younger Medvedev, would have lost theirs. That was at least until the on-court interview, when Medvedev turned on the crowd by denouncing their behavior, later suggesting that some of those who mocked him between serves "probably have low IQs." These comments will inevitably lead to more noise from a home crowd whose exuberant energy is becoming a dominant topic of conversation at this Australian Open. It could give Medvedev a second Grand Slam title.

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