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Dylan Reid in Celtic vs Rangers transfer battle as Ange Postecoglou confirms bid for St Mirren starlet

The Parkhead boss is aiming to add hard-hitting players to his title-winning roster before the start of the 2022-23 season. (Author: Gardener)

Dylan ReidAnge Postecoglou confirmed Celtic's offer for Dylan Reid but insisted his immediate priority is adding big-hitters to his title-winning squad. Postecoglou admitted he would move to the B-team if the Scotland Under-17 international signs. The Celtic recruiting team are hard at work on top team goals but Postecoglou doesn't expect any signings in the next few days but there could be some movement as Portuguese side Arouca are linked with a move for midfielder Ismaila Soro. Postecoglou said: “I think (Dylan Reid) this is more for our B team and our academy. “I think between now and whenever the window closes it (first-team transfers) will always be imminent but will anything happen in the next 24 hours? “We need to bring in at least a few more players and we are working on that and in terms of exits there are obviously some things going on behind the scenes with some players. My focus is more on the guys who are here and on the guys we want to bring in.” Celtic were disappointed with yesterday's 3-3 win over Rapid Wien at the Allianz Stadium. The Hoops had taken the lead three times and were eviscerated by the Austrians equalizing with the final touch of the game. Postecoglou was also able to give runouts to 21 of his first-team players. The Celtic manager said: "It was a great game. Sometimes in these friendlies you worry that the intensity isn't quite there. “Sometimes it was like a real competition, that was awesome. Kudos to Rapid and our boys for making it a real competitive game with the crowd out there too. “It's a game we can take stuff out of. Sometimes in friendlies things can be disguised but I thought for the whole game it was a good competition.” Celtic looked good up front but they dropped a couple of weak goals with some key defenders missing. Discussing the error between Cameron Carter-Vickers and Joe Hart in scoring the first goal, Postecoglou said: "It's a mistake mate. Mistakes happen. "I don't focus on things like that. There are other things I thought about, especially in the first half. "Sometimes the lads were a bit careless with the ball, especially in the transition phase. We had some really incredible moments in transition. “Sometimes we've made too many touches or played for too long and that's just not our game. They are the kind of things that appeal to you. We conceded a goal from a mistake, but they're human. We had some really good things and some really bad things.” Right-backs Josip Juranovic and Anthony Ralston both missed this game through injury, but Postecoglou confirmed both will be fit for Wednesday's trip to Bank Ostrava.

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Connor Goldson details Rangers contract timing, silences Ibrox critics and targets silverware after new deal

CONNOR GOLDSON heard the rumors and read the comments. Through all of this, he knew it would be good to talk. (Author: Gardener)

Connor GoldsonThe Englishman kept his advice and trusted his inner circle while outsiders speculated about his position and questioned his intentions in the final months of his Rangers contract. Above all, it was not the last months of his Rangers career. The narrative was set that Goldson would leave Glasgow after four years, return south of the border to be closer to family and rake in a Premier League payday. While others talked about his future, Goldson focused on his football. After sitting down, talking it through and thinking it through, the decision was an easy one. A new contract was signed in early June and Goldson will spend the next four years at a club that has become a second home and holds a special place in his heart. "I can't say I ever had any intention of leaving because I never spoke to anyone," Goldson said. “It was a decision for the whole family because my wife is up here alone with two children. “Our family is four, five hours away. "But when we walked away and actually talked about it, we said we're happy here. "My wife is gradually finding her footing after Covid, she's getting out and making friends. "I've always said I'm happy here, but I wanted to be appreciated. “At the end of the club and that happened within three days after I was on holiday. “I didn't really speak to Rangers during the season. It came out in the press a couple of times that I turned down contracts and I never did. “I was offered a contract after we won the league. It was negotiated but then we let football do the talking, especially at the end of last season when we had so many important games. "So the whole thing about me turning down contracts wasn't true at all." The news that Goldson had put paper to paper came out of the blue, but it was a moment to savor for an endorsement that feared the worst and had begun planning for life after a hugely influential figure in and out of the park in Ibrox. An Instagram post made the 29-year-old's position perfectly clear as he addressed the rumors and the negativity, his family and his dreams and his hopes for the future with Rangers. Goldson has spent this week with Van Bronckhorst's side at their training base in Portugal. "So when I finally signed, I made a post on social media saying I've been talked about so much, which was wrong," Goldson added. "I didn't speak at the time, I didn't give any interviews and I think a lot of fans took that to mean that I wanted to leave the football club. “I left social media when the season started, but you still see these things because your family and friends are sending you articles. "The day I signed my contract with Rangers, there was a report this morning saying I was already on my way to sign for Nottingham Forest. It's frustrating because you see it all and some fans actually take that as the truth.” The same supporters who questioned or criticized Goldson will now back him as he aims to bring Rangers home this season To inspire silver and European success. The trip to Portugal and Saturday night's friendly against Sunderland allowed Rangers to look ahead and try to banish the memories of that agonizing defeat just a few hours later. Some 100,000 fans traveled to Seville and saw Rangers return empty-handed, but Goldson, a stalwart of promotion and promotion over the past four seasons, has every reason to look to the future with joy and confidence. "It didn't surprise me," Goldson said of the touring support who dared to dream of European glory. But you actually expect it. “My family and friends were all there. Being able to walk around and take it all in made for a very special few days. “We didn't win it, which was unfortunate. "Have we won enough in the four years I've had "But at the same time it's been a journey. It's been about getting this football club to where we are now. I know Rangers fans expect to grow every single year win, but to be honest the team I joined "Four years ago wasn't a win. Now, four years later, we are fighting for everything. "I know we didn't win the league and that was disappointing. But now Rangers can look ahead and say we're in a position to compete and win things." Team I joined without being disrespectful, unable to do so."

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3 talking points as Celtic denied victory on fatality while Rapid Wien clinched a tie in a six-goal thriller

It was an entertaining game as Ange Postecoglou watched his side be denied a second pre-season win straight in death. (Author: Gardener)

CelticCeltic were denied victory in a vibrant pre-season friendly against old opponents Rapid Vienna as Ange Postecoglou watched his side be defeated in a six-goal thriller at the Allianz Stadium in Austria. Matt O'Riley's brilliant early opener was nullified by Bernhard Zimmermann, who capitalized on the defensive mix to equalize before David Turnbull restored the Hoops' lead. Rene Kriwak equalized for the second time before Kyogo fired the visitors forward again. Emanuel Aiwu headed home a leveler after dying. Postecoglou brought out the big guns for a massive leap in class after the seven-goal opener against regional club SC Wiener Viktoria. Last season's loanees Jota and Cameron Carter-Vickers received their first misses since writing permanent Parkhead deals. And it was Jota who came so close to snagging a rapid-fire opener, but Paul Gartler made a brilliant close-range save after Callum McGregor - who has now shed his protective mask - hired him. But the keeper from Rapid Vienna had no choice when the hoops took the lead shortly afterwards - and this time Jota as the preparer. The former Benfica man showed exactly why Postecoglou was so keen to tie him to a permanent contract with a great ball for O'Riley and the Denmark Under-21 international - who has been the focus of attention for the whole World Cup year wants to attract attention – sent a brilliant finish deep into the corner. It was a brilliant start for Celtic but the home side were dangerous on the break and Joe Hart showed again just how vital he is - and what Benji Siegrist needs to be given in the side as ex-England captain brilliantly repelled Nicolas-Gerrit Kuhn's attempt , after defeating Osaze Urhoghide with a cross. But he didn't cover himself in glory as Rapid equalized earlier. Carter-Vickers played a pass over the six-yard box back to Hart, but he ran it over him and that allowed Ante Bajic to pinch it and win the ball before squared to Zimmermann, who made the easy task had to hit the ball into the net. Postecoglou made 10 substitutions at the break with only Urhoghide remaining from the starting XI and back in the lead 10 minutes after the restart. Christopher Jullien launched Kyogo and the Japanese star's brilliant ball was caught by Turnbull, who fired home. Urhoghide was caught under a deep cross and while Scott Bain saved Marco Grull with a fine save, there was nothing he could do to stop Kriwak scoring the rebound. But Celtic were ahead again as Turnbull brilliantly won the ball and fed Kyogo, who provided the finish to return his teammate's earlier favor. A combination of Bain exploits and then the woodwork denied Rapid Vienna another equalizer but Celtic couldn't hold out as Aiwu headed into the corner on death. Joe Hart made a world-class save to deny Rapid Vienna an equalizer and underscore how important he is to Celtic. It wasn't Cameron Carter-Vickers' best pass back to his goalkeeper, but the former England No. 1 let it run over him rather than simply whip him away. He couldn't stop the danger as Ante Bajic was lurking and he made a big challenge to capture the ball straight to Bernhard Zimmermann and he just had to hit it into the empty goal. Incidents like this can be afforded in a pre-season friendly, but it wasn't uncommon last season and the defense will need to iron out such mistakes when the competition begins. It's a great year for Matt O'Riley who, using the Champions League as his platform, will have ambitions to topple Denmark's World Cup squad for Qatar 2022. But he scored his opening goal brilliantly here and the classy midfielder must have a chance with a header this winter in the Middle East. The 22-year-old, who was on loan at Oostende last season, got his chance to be the only player to show what he can do. He had 90 minutes, but misjudged the cross for Rapid Vienna's second goal and generally just didn't look up, asserting himself in the first team.

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At Celtic and Motherwell pre-season camps in Austria as clubs prepare for the new season

Celtic and Motherwell have intensified their pre-season campaigns at the camp in Austria; Sky Sports News Mark Benstead has spent time with both sides as they prepare for the season; The Scottish Premiership campaign begins on July 30th (Author: Gardener)

AustriaMotherwell and Celtic have three things in common this summer; both are preparing for European football, both have spent their pre-season in Austria and both teams have spent their downtime on Love Island... Sky Sports News reporter Mark Benstead spent with the two this week teams to get an idea of ​​how they are shaping up ahead of the new campaign. Half a sentence from their manager Graham Alexander, two replies in his first interview summed up pretty well why he decided to fly his team to Obertraun for pre-season. The crew has worked hard here, 6am alarm calls quickly followed by 6km runs through the woods. Most days, that's all before the double workouts, which are then topped off with Mother Nature's version of the modern ice bath; a dip in the local rivers or - the Hallstätter See, the lake in the center of the city. That kind of bravery can get you far in a season! Talking to the manager, I think two things are clear. There have been many shifts and changes in the Motherwell squad in recent years; Only two new faces were added this summer - Paul McGinn and Blair Spittal. He's still hoping to add a few more, but overall he's happy his group has a more unified look at it. He can build on the positive results of last season instead of having to start from scratch. The second thing that is clear is that he has no illusions about how difficult it will be to repeat last season's successes. Finishing fifth and securing a European spot is above what the club should expect, at least budget wise. That's not to say the team doesn't believe there are things they can improve on. I've had the chance to go for a bike ride around town with keeper Liam Kelly and he knows the performances could have been better, especially towards the end of last season, but his view was pretty reasonable: 'We finished fifth and we know that there is still a lot of room for improvement, that's better than finishing ninth or tenth." He has an argument. From Motherwell's mountain base it was a drive down the A2 motorway to Celtic at their camp in Bad Erlach. Her plan for the week is a mix of training and pre-season games. Much like Motherwell, there is a certain consistency in their roster. The summer so far has been both about retaining players - Jota and Cameron Carter-Vickers - and adding new faces (although there have been a few in the form of Ben Siegrist and Alexandro Bernabei). The biggest change for Ange Postecoglou as he prepares for his second season as team boss is actually getting time on the training ground to work with his players. He had next to no time with the whole group last season as he juggled a dozen new faces and the restrictions imposed by Covid. This time he's getting that time with the team and you can tell he's enjoying it. I stood and watched one of the workouts and it was Ange who oversaw the first practice. It was based on moving the ball quickly and building up attacks. He wants his teams to attack harder and that's partly because of making them fitter. His side had a useful knack for scoring late goals last season (Ross County away, Dundee Utd at home in the spring), it's a little ominous for the other sides to think they'll be in even better form going into the season could be, and be able to press harder for longer. There has been a notable addition to the Celtic backroom team recently with Harry Kewell joining the coaching staff. The former Leeds Utd and Liverpool winger featured in two Champions League finals so it's fair to say he has invaluable experience to bring to the squad, but he's also bringing a breath of fresh air, according to his boss Things. As Postecoglou told me, "If players come in and don't see a change, I don't think that's the right message." New faces on and off the field can make a difference and Kewell's appointment is certainly interesting. There are a few players here in Austria with question marks in front of their names going into the new campaign. The Swiss striker made 17 appearances last season, most recently in December, so it's safe to say he's low on the pecking order. He looked set to leave Glasgow but a move to Germany fell through and with fellow defender Carl Starfelt returning from injury and potentially fit for the start of the season, could he now have a future at the club? Chances are he's still going, but he's played pre-season and you're just wondering if things could change if he plays well and can play the way Ange expects his centre-backs to. Like Graham Alexander, Postecoglou is also looking to expand his player pool, particularly in midfield as Nir Bitton and Tom Rogic have both been lost. With skipper Callum McGregor, however, one of his potentially most important figures is already sitting in his team's engine room. He made 63 appearances for club and country last season and will be crucial for Celtic again this season. At the moment, he's juggling his role as a driving force in training alongside that of social organizer away from the squad. As is the case with Motherwell, Love Island is the entertainment of choice after pre-season training. What fascinates me is that McGregor says it's not just the local boys who choose this as their evening show, even the overseas boys are getting involved now. but if it builds team spirit, who am I to disagree with?

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How Cameron Norrie can beat Novak Djokovic in Wimbledon semifinals

British tennis star Cameron Norrie meets Wimbledon champion Novak Djokovic in the 2022 semifinals - here are four ways he can win. (Author: Gardener)

Cameron NorrieCameron Norrie faces a daunting Wimbledon semi-final against current champion Novak Djokovic - but how can the British No1 beat him? Top-seeded Djokovic is chasing his seventh Wimbledon title after winning the last three straight championships and is aiming to win his first Grand Slam of 2022 after Rafael Nadal won Roland Garros and the Australian Open. World No. 12 Norrie, meanwhile, is enjoying his best run ever in a major tournament, reaching the last four for the first time. This makes him the first man to reach a Wimbledon semi-final since Andy Murray won SW19 in 2016. Brit star Norrie, who won Indian Wells last year and has four ATP Tour titles under his belt, faces the biggest match of his career against 20-time Grand Slam winner Djokovic - and here are four things he did can do to beat the Serb... If there is one who knows how to beat Novak Djokovic, it's his old rival Andy Murray, who is a good friend of fellow Britishman Cam Norrie. Murray and Djokovic have met 36 times - 19 of them in the final - with the Scot coming out on top in 11 of those encounters. Ahead of his semi-final match, Norrie revealed he would learn some of Djokovic's secrets from Murray, saying: "Andy has been super supportive of me and my team. He gives us great support. “Obviously he loves tennis so he follows anything and everything. Yeah I think it's not a bad guy to ask him about tactics. I'm going to enjoy today and maybe reach out to him to see what he's got.” This one seems obvious but playing in front of a sold-out UK home crowd on Center Court should be a big boost for Cam Norrie. Norrie has previously spoken about how encouraging the crowd at certain moments during the Championship was crucial for him and ahead of his clash with Djokovic he said: "Hopefully you guys can get behind me and I'm sure you can After beating Tommy Paul in the fourth round, Norrie added: "I'm the last [Brit] left so why not get some more behind me now? "I think from the first round everyone was behind me and supported me and that showed in difficult moments in the games... It was great that you guys helped me with that." Novak Djokovic also acknowledged that home audience can play a role. and said: "To play here at Wimbledon on Center Court [in] the semifinals of a Slam in his country... I know what to expect in terms of crowd support." Cam Norrie has only played against Novak Djokovic once before, and that came last year's ATP Indoor Finals in Italy, as the latter secured a dominant 6-2, 6-1 win. Djokovic downplayed that win after beating Jannik Sinner in the Wimbledon quarter-finals, saying: “Different conditions, different tournament, different environment than [here]. there were too many free points, too many easy points in it. "But I think it comes down to a little bit that you play him and sometimes try to overdo it. He was too good, very relaxed, he's playing great and the conditions are perfect for him.” A key tactical advantage for Cam Norrie is that he's left-handed while Novak Djokovic is right-handed. Norrie is also known for his unorthodox groundstrokes and has previously stated that he likes long, physical fights. "I know his game well," Djokovic said of Norrie's style of play. Referring to his own style of play, Norrie previously said, "If I play physical tennis and let the other person suffer, then I succeed." Five facts ahead of the Brit's Wimbledon debut in the semifinals Follow Metro Sport for the latest news on News

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"He's not a chicken anymore"

As Cameron Norrie prepares for his maiden Wimbledon semi-final, BBC Sport looks at how he got there. (Author: Gardener)

Cameron NorrieCameron Norrie is only the fourth Brit to reach the semifinals of Wimbledon in the Open era. Norrie, who has a Scottish father and a Welsh mother, was born in South Africa and grew up in New Zealand. Norrie represented New Zealand as a youngster but despite reaching 10th in the world junior rankings he was overlooked when it came to funding and his mother said at the time the family was "very disappointed" with Tennis New Zealand's support. New Zealand newspapers have often referred to him as 'the one who got away' - a statement that only grew louder with each new milestone in Norrie's career. When Norrie made his professional debut in 2017 at the age of 22, he had three years of college life behind him with a sociology degree from Texas Christian University. He told BBC Sport that it gave him a chance to mature and "live a more normal life" rather than traveling the world alone on one of the tours at the age of 17. He said collegiate tennis allows him to have "a decent social life" and interests outside of tennis, which gives him a good balance and a better sense of perspective. That's not to say tennis isn't his number one priority now - he's aware that is the case, telling reporters after his quarter-final win that he puts it first and hasn't had a vacation in a long time. But he says it was his time in college that made him "pretty focused and pretty calm" on the pitch. During his studies, he had a moped accident, which he described as a "turning point" in his life. "In the fall of my sophomore year at TCU, I made my way back to my dorm after a usual Thursday night at the bars," he wrote on behindtheraquet.com. “I decided to drive my moped to my girlfriend who I was dating at the time. He told British media at Wimbledon this week that he had realized he was "not making the best decisions" and would go out more than "After that the coaches really kicked me into gear and I was definitely more professional." Norrie admitted in February 'One of the most impressive debuts of all time' in Britain's Davis Cup defeat by Spain in 2018. said ex-captain John Lloyd, who, two sets down, stunned Roberto Bautista Agut - who was 91 places ahead of him - to record Britain's only win in the game they lost 3-1, with Norrie also having one Set against Albert took Ramos-Vinolas. They were his first professional matches on red clay, and the first time he went past three sets. Less than a year later, Norrie reached his first ATP final - at the Auckland International in New Zealand of all places. in January 2019. Then ranked No. 93 in the world, he was beaten in straight sets by American Tennys Sandgren in the city where he grew up. It would be another two and a half years before he won his first ATP title, which came in the finals of the Los Cabos Open in Mexico. Norrie missed the Tokyo Olympics in 2021 to focus on the ATP Tour, a decision that paid off in October when he became the first Brit to win the prestigious title at Indian Wells. The Masters 1,000 event is one of the biggest titles in tennis and the win propelled him to British number one, propelled him to then 16th in the world and placed him in contention for the Elite season-ending ATP Finals. He had started 2021 at No. 74 in the world but reached six finals and won two titles to end the year at No. 12. He qualified as a second proxy for the ATP Finals and made his debut at the event after two eliminations, losing in three sets to Norway's Casper Ruud and in straight sets to Novak Djokovic. His good form continued into 2022 when he won two more titles, leading him to climb into the world top 10 in April. For all his growing success on the ATP Tour, he failed to translate that into a deep run at a Grand Slam, which is perhaps why he flew under the radar for the once-a-year Wimbledon crowd. He had reached third rounds at the Australian, French and US Opens and Wimbledon in 2021 in recent years, but had never reached week two of a major until this year. This time he meets the other member of the sport's 'big three' in Djokovic, the defending champion. But it's in the last four and after his emotional quarter-final win over David Goffin, his profile has exploded. Norrie has earned a reputation for being one of the fittest players on the tour. According to Runner's World, he has a personal best 10K time of around 36 minutes, and his Argentine trainer Facundo Lugones said his "biggest asset on the physical side is his stamina". On Wednesday, Lugones said Norrie could get his heart rate up to 200 beats per minute and keep it up "for six, seven minutes, no problem". "He can play not just a few hours but four hours while maintaining the same physical level," Lugones told atptour.com last year. "Some players can be really physical, but only for two hours. Norrie has even said that he will pull his legs back 'against anyone, even Rafa [Nadal]'. Lugones, who has been with Norrie for seven years, said that He and Norrie have "a great relationship" and that they are "very respectful of each other," adding, "Off the court we talk about everything. When we play tennis, really, really professionally, very seriously." earlier than his 'chicken" and explained why. "It was a long time ago. In Argentina, when you take care of someone, you call them like your chicken, like you take care of them," he said. "When I started with to travel him, all my friends asked me: 'How are you? Chicken do?' in Spanish. Norrie was emotional after his win over Goffin - and his family and viewers on Court One joined in tears.If the British public wasn't all that aware of Norrie up to this point, that's when he endeared himself, all under the eyes of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge too, with even more eyes likely to be on him when he takes on Djokovic on Friday.

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Norrie loses as Djokovic reaches Wimbledon final

Britain's Cameron Norrie is unable to capitalize on a confident start while Novak Djokovic fights back to reach the Wimbledon men's singles final. (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonBritain's Cameron Norrie failed to capitalize on a confident start as Novak Djokovic hit back to reach the Wimbledon men's final. But after winning the first set, he lost to the top seed 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4. Serb Djokovic, who is targeting a fourth consecutive title and seventh overall, meets Australian Nick Kyrgios in Sunday's final. The 35-year-old will also be vying for a 21st men's Grand Slam title, which would put him adrift of Rafael Nadal's record. Spaniard Nadal, 36, was due to face Kyrgios in Friday's second semi-final but pulled out of Thursday's game with a stomach injury. Norrie, seeded ninth, became the first British player to reach a semi-final in Wimbledon singles since Johanna Konta in 2017, and received partisan support on Center Court. The atmosphere turned celebratory as Norrie broke three times to win the opening set before becoming increasingly stifled as Djokovic eventually found his level. Norrie received a thunderous round of applause as he left center court, including from Djokovic, who stepped down and applauded his departure. "Cameron didn't have much to lose, he played the tournament of his life," said Djokovic. “Cameron dominated the game and I was lucky to break his serve in set number two. Finally, despite the apparent disappointment of not being able to maintain his quick start against Djokovic, Norrie will look back on these two weeks with great pride. Hander had never progressed past the third round in a Grand Slam before, breaking that barrier and then battling himself harder and harder to reach the last four, winning the ATP Tour title with increasing prestige was in a wonderful first set of the Brits clear. After scoring two break points in the first game of the match, Norrie claimed the first by dragging Djokovic across the court and smashing a winner past the Serb as he charged forward. After a nervous hold at love meant he couldn't consolidate the break, Norrie was soon in the lead again and that was helped by Djokovic's own nervousness. Two more uncharacteristic errors from Djokovic, smacking two long forehands from the baseline allowed Norrie to break again and take a 3-2 lead. This time Norrie held to solidify the break, further errors from Djokovic's racquet culminating in a forehand into the net. Another break to make it 5-2 saw Norrie serve for the set and after two double faults, including one at set point, he hammered in an ace to seal the opener. Still, among the realists, there was a feeling that Djokovic couldn't keep playing so badly and give chances to his opponent. That proved true as the defending champion improved his level and placed himself in an eighth Wimbledon men's final, a tally surpassed only by Roger Federer's 12 appearances there. It's also his 32nd Grand Slam final overall, putting him ahead of Federer as a men's record.

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Wimbledon 2022 run 'means nothing' after Novak Djokovic defeat despite 'quite sick' fortnight

Norrie won't pick up the 720 points normally awarded to a Grand Slam semifinalist but says it "doesn't change anything". (Author: Gardener)

Novak DjokovicWIMBLEDON - There are no ranking points from his Wimbledon run, but Cameron Norrie has at least raised his expectations despite being knocked out by Novak Djokovic in Friday's semifinals. The British No.1 began his Wimbledon campaign on the No.1 court and ended in a four-set loss to the top seed at center. As the last Brit in singles, Norrie has been in the spotlight longer than his compatriots this time around and as the 26-year-old has also reached the second week of a Grand Slam for the first time he is excited for more. It's nice to do and experience. “Reaching the semifinals, reaching Friday of week two is pretty sick but I think for myself I want to do more of that and go that step further and try to win a Slam. “There were a lot of firsts for me this week, a lot of good experiences. Compared to Novak it was just the execution level of him better than mine today in my opinion. Norrie pounced on a subpar start from Djokovic, breaking three times along the way to take the opening set 6-2. The heavy underdog had suddenly given center court reason for hope, but Djokovic slowly fought back the momentum, converting his fourth break point of set number two before winning it 6-4. It soon became clear that Norrie would have to go the distance to beat Djokovic, who sped through the third set 6-2 and had improved significantly from his performance in the opener. There was to be no comeback, however, as Djokovic won the fourth set 6-4 and despite being denied the 720 ranking points offered to a semi-finalist - the ATP's response to Wimbledon's ban on Russian players - world No. 12 Norrie says it's changing "nothing" for him. "It would be nice to have those [ranking points]," Norrie added. "But nothing really changes. “I think Novak falls to 7th in the world. I think it's disappointing for me. But for me it doesn't change anything. I still play all tournaments. "I'm still in the rankings - I don't even know where I'm ranked after that - 11, 10 I think. It does not change anything. I'll still be seeded and still be in every tournament.” For more tennis news, interviews and features, follow i sport on Facebook or listen to the Love Tennis Podcast, hosted by i's James Gray is featured on iTunes, Spotify, or just search "Love Tennis" wherever you find your podcasts

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Norrie loses as Djokovic reaches Wimbledon final

Britain's Cameron Norrie is unable to capitalize on a confident start while Novak Djokovic fights back to reach the Wimbledon men's singles final. (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonBritain's Cameron Norrie failed to capitalize on a confident start as Novak Djokovic hit back to reach the Wimbledon men's final. But after winning the first set, he lost to the top seed 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4. Serb Djokovic, who is targeting a fourth consecutive title and seventh overall, meets Australian Nick Kyrgios in Sunday's final. The 35-year-old will also be vying for a 21st men's Grand Slam title, which would put him adrift of Rafael Nadal's record. Spaniard Nadal, 36, was due to face Kyrgios in Friday's second semi-final but pulled out of Thursday's game with a stomach injury. Norrie, seeded ninth, became the first British player to reach a semi-final in Wimbledon singles since Johanna Konta in 2017, and received partisan support on Center Court. The atmosphere turned celebratory as Norrie broke three times to win the opening set before becoming increasingly stifled as Djokovic eventually found his level. Norrie received a thunderous round of applause as he left center court, including from Djokovic, who stepped down and applauded his departure. "Cameron didn't have much to lose, he played the tournament of his life," said Djokovic. "Cameron dominated the game and I was lucky to break his serve in the second set. He gifted me a game and from there the momentum changed I think." Finally, despite the apparent disappointment of not being able to maintain his quick start against Djokovic, Norrie will look back on these two weeks with great pride fought to strength to reach the last four. The confidence he's had over the past couple of seasons through rapid rises in the rankings and winning ATP Tour titles of increasing prestige was evident in the Briton in a wonderful opener. After scoring two break points in the first game of the game After scoring, Norrie clinched the first dragging Djokovic across the court and hit a winner past the Serb as he charged forward. Norrie soon led again after a nervous service game that meant he was unable to consolidate the break, and that was aided by Djokovic's own edginess. Two more uncharacteristic errors from Djokovic, who hit two forehands long from the baseline, allowed Norrie to break again and take a 3-2 lead. This time Norrie held to solidify the break, further errors from Djokovic's racquet culminating in a forehand into the net. Another break to make it 5-2 saw Norrie serve for the set and after two double faults, including one at set point, he hammered in an ace to seal the opener. Returning to the sun-drenched court with a cap early in the second set, Djokovic served better and dropped just a point in his first four service games. More pressure built on Norrie's serve, leading to more errors from the Brit, particularly on his forehand. Djokovic eventually earned his fourth break point of the set for a 5-3 lead when Norrie hit a long forehand but the damage was done by missing a volley he was expected to put away for 15-30. Norrie started the third set with a point win that sent Djokovic smacking the strings, but the game quickly switched in the Serb's favour. Djokovic scored a third break point for the first time to progress in the match and after winning seven of the next nine games it looked unlikely Norrie would be able to fight back to win. He served up the win to propel himself into an eighth Wimbledon men's final, a tally surpassed only by Roger Federer's 12 appearances there. It's also his 32nd Grand Slam final overall, putting him ahead of Federer as a men's record. "Of course I've had a lot of Grand Slam semifinals, but it's never easy to go on the pitch," said Djokovic. “You have a lot of pressure and expectations, from yourself and others. Cameron dominated the game and I felt like I was lucky to break his serve in the second set. “He kind of gifted me a game and since then the momentum has shifted a bit. That's the meaning of the semifinals of a Grand Slam."

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Wimbledon semifinals 'pretty sick' but Norrie wants more

Britain's Cameron Norrie says reaching the Wimbledon semifinals is 'pretty sick' and gives him extra belief he can win a Grand Slam title. (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonBritain's Cameron Norrie says reaching the Wimbledon semifinals was "pretty sick" and gave him extra faith he could win a Grand Slam title in the future. But Norrie faded as Djokovic improved to win 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4 on center court. Of the experience, Norrie said, "I want to walk more and do more of the same, go further and try to win a Slam." The left-hander was only aiming to become the fourth Briton to reach the final at the All England Club in the Open era. It was his first major semifinal, having never progressed past the third round of a major before. After a confident start, Norrie began to make more mistakes as the level of 20-time Grand Slam champion Djokovic improved to set up a meeting with Australia's Nick Kyrgios in Sunday's final. "I think it was obviously a good experience playing against Novak, especially the level he brings here at Wimbledon," Norrie said. "It gives me a lot of confidence." Reaching the semifinals, reaching Friday of week two is pretty sick. "It's nice to do it and experience it. I think I have to keep working hard and I still have a lot of things I can improve on my game." Norrie had been bidding to become the second Briton after Andy Murray to reach a Wimbledon men's singles final of the Open era. Throughout the two-week Wimbledon week he received wonderful support from the home crowd and it culminated in one partisan atmosphere on Center Court for the semi-finals. Wimbledon's famous mound was also packed with fans watching the large crowd The Serb, who is seeking a fourth consecutive Wimbledon title, upped his game as the game progressed through and win. Afterwards, Djokovic praised Norrie and said he expected he would still have many chances to reach a Grand Slam final. "He's an all-round player and a very professional guy," said Djokovic. Djokovic backed Norrie to have more chances of reaching a Grand Slam final, saying: “Definitely. Very professional guy. I see the things he does off the pitch. I see the things he does off the pitch. With that kind of approach, I feel like you're always going to get chances." With that kind of approach, I feel like you're always going to get chances." "I think I have a lot of things to be proud of," said Norrie, who was ninth seeded and defeated Pablo Andujar, Jaume Munar, Steve Johnson, Tommy Paul and David Goffin to reach the semifinals. "Coming here, pretty high, a lot of expectations from everyone across the country - and me especially Court One, and playing guys I actually like best to beat. Serving that game against Goffin in particular to reach my first semi-final was pretty crazy."

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