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'Del Boy' Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi' replaces billionaire Rishi Sunak

The Tory MP's rise to No 11 Downing Street is extraordinary considering he arrived from Iraq at the age of nine as a Kurdish refugee and made a fortune founding YouGov (pictured in the 1990s). . (Author: Gardener)

Del Boy'Nadhim Zahawi today started his biggest job yet as Chancellor in another calculated bet for the Tory MP whose risk-taking has compared him to Only Fools and Horses' Del Boy and a candidate trying to impress Lord Sugar on The Apprentice. The 55-year-old Tory MP's rise to 11 Downing Street is extraordinary considering he arrived with his family as a Kurdish refugee from Iraq aged nine fleeing Saddam Hussein and made a fortune , by founding polling firm YouGov and building a £100m estate portfolio. Friends have said Mr Zahawi's "real blood and passion was politics" - but before he was elected Tory MP for Stratford-Upon-Avon in 2010, he devoted himself to making a "f**k load of money". Another friend in Parliament said, "He's kind of a lovable wheeler dealer guy," adding that there was "a little Del Boy about him." Today, as he begins his first day as Chancellor, Mr Zahawi, a married father of three, said he supports Boris Johnson because he is "dedicated to the country that has given me everything" - and denied he has his own personal Ambition to become prime minister strengthened. An early business as a young entrepreneur selling Teletubbies clothing at the height of the show's fame went bust and supporters including former Tory grandee Jeffrey Archer lost their money. But he became one of the wealthiest politicians in the House of Commons after helping found YouGov alongside his friend Stephan Shakespeare, who studied chemical engineering at University College London. In 2002 he risked ITV's Pop Idol - the biggest TV show at the time - which would net him even more money in a story Friends use to explain his mindset in business and now politics. But YouGov polls said otherwise, and he put thousands of pounds on Will Young to win, which he did, allowing the Chancellor to beat the bookies and pundits and make a fortune. He genuinely believed what we were doing was right, he was willing to take the risk, he enjoyed the show and the fun of it all - but he also wanted to make a heck of a lot of money. Not only did Nadhim win the bet, he boosted YouGov's credibility and three years later he is said to have made £5.7million when it went public. A senior government figure has said Zahawi is a calculated risk-taker - a claim made today when he decided to back Boris Johnson with his leadership at risk. Former YouGov president Peter Kellner said he would have been a "perfect" candidate for TV game show The Apprentice had the show starring Lord Sugar existed in the 1980s and 1990s. "He was very smart and smart business-wise," he said, adding it's no surprise he's had success as vaccine secretary in the pandemic because "in a way, the vaccine job is like an Alan Sugar challenge that's very capitalized.” . He is now considered one of the favorites to succeed Boris Johnson. Friend Tobias Ellwood, a harsh critic of Mr Johnson, has long said he would support him if he stood up for the leader. He told Politico: "Too many people have responsibilities in the Cabinet that arguably shouldn't be there given the changing environment from December 2019 to today. "His promotion [to Education Secretary] recognizes that we have quality people in the ranks of Parliament with skills that can and should be utilised." Mr Zahawi was privately educated at King's College School in West London and University College London , where he studied chemical engineering. Zahawi later acted as an advisor to Lord Archer before entering politics himself. Last year, Mr. Zahawi faced re-examination of his part-time income after he used a loophole in the law to protect his total income. The new Chancellor earned more than £1.3million from a role at Bermuda-listed Gulf Keystone from 2015 until his appointment as Minister. But his total income from side jobs since becoming MP in 2010 is unknown because he managed it through a consulting firm, Zahawi and Zahawi, which he founded with his wife Lana before he was elected MP for Stratford in 2010. But Sir Alistair Graham, a former chairman of the Committee on Standards in Public Life told the Mirror: "This could be interpreted as a deliberate attempt to sidestep the rules so he doesn't have to admit the level of his earnings as a consultant. "Voters have a right to know how much time and money he spends on his political work." Mr. Zahawi, the Iraqi-born founder of YouGov, was appointed Chief Strategy Officer at Gulf Keystone Petroleum in 2015 and reported outside earnings equivalent to £765,000 a year. He also received a series of bonuses between January and June 2016 totaling £78,246.38 plus a payment of £52,325 made in September 2015 for 210 hours worked, backdated to July last year. Previously, Zahawi served as an advisor to Afren, another oil company that went under in 2015. Most recently he was Minister for Education, had early success as Minister for Vaccines and, upon his appointment in November 2020, helped lead the government's vaccination programme. Appointed Chancellor Hours after Rishi Sunak resigned, Mr Zahawi will now take on one of the biggest roles in government, serving the embattled prime minister amid the worst cost-of-living crisis in a generation. Regarded as a “safe pair of hands”, he came to the role of education secretary following the sacking of Gavin Williamson, who had become deeply unpopular with the public over the exam fiasco during the Covid-19 pandemic. His tenure in the role has not been without its difficulties, and in recent weeks he has been trying to stave off possible strike action by teachers, which he has called "unforgivable" months after children returned to school after the pandemic halted. Mr Zahawi became junior education secretary under Theresa May but his loyalty to Boris Johnson has never seriously wavered. By taking on the role of Chancellor on Tuesday night, he had decided to save Mr Johnson from a comedy of mistakes. Mr Zahawi said the government made a "mistake" in relation to Chris Pincher. It was presented to the new Chancellor on ITV's Good Morning Britain: "In the last few minutes a minister has resigned because what he was told by No10 about what the Prime Minister knew was not true. That's why I said we made a mistake.' And of course the Prime Minister said 'in hindsight I shouldn't have appointed Chris Pincher as deputy leader'. I think that's the right way to deal with it, in my opinion - if you know you've made a mistake, you have to come out and admit it Wednesday morning, he said he had "no other choice" after appearing on TV was to defend the Prime Minister with briefings from Downing Street "which have now been shown to be inaccurate." In his resignation letter he claimed Mr Johnson had apologized to him for the No 10 briefings ahead of Monday's media round This is the awkward moment Boris Johnson's new chancellor Nadhim Zahawi learned of two resignations live on the BBC as the Tory leader desperately tries to hold on to his job while ministers resigned en masse and he was beaten in the House of Commons. Mr Zahawi was in the midst of a barbecue from Nick Robinson on Radio 4's flagship program Today when he was informed that Children's Secretary Will Quince and Junior Transport Secretary Laura Trott had joined the Exodus and slammed the No 10. false claims fed to them by #10 about the Chris Pincher scandal. When asked if that meant Mr Johnson was "over", a somber-looking Mr Zahawi replied: "I am deeply sorry that colleagues are leaving government." In response to Ms Trott's resignation, he said: "It I'm sorry to lose a Conservative and of course I'm sorry to lose a talented Member of Parliament like Laura Trott. Boris Johnson received applause and some boos as he arrived in the Commons chamber. Gaps were seen on the Conservative benches as the PM's questions got under way. New Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi, Culture Minister Nadine Dorries and Scottish Minister Alister Jack were among Boris Johnson's front-bench allies. Mr Glen said he had a "complete lack of confidence" in Mr Johnson, while Mr Walker said the government was "shadowed by mistakes and issues of integrity". Other junior aides have also been voting with their feet as the prime minister faces another brutal 24 hours running the PMQs gauntlet at midday before the powerful liaison committee - including some of its harshest critics - grills for three hours. MailOnline understands Mr Javid will make what could be a highly damaging statement of resignation in the House of Commons this afternoon, although Mr Sunak has no intention of using the platform. It will raise fears in No 10 that he may be trying to mimic Geoffrey Howe's 1990 farewell shot that helped topple Margaret Thatcher. Mutinous Tories are urging the chairman of the 1922 Backbench Committee, Sir Graham Brady, to step in and tell the Prime Minister his time is up. They vow to change the rules of the party so he can be ousted if he tries to continue. Mr Quince tweeted: "It is with great sadness and regret that I submitted my resignation to the Prime Minister this morning after accepting and repeating assurances to the media on Monday that have now been shown to be inaccurate." The majority of Conservatives now think that Boris Johnson should retire, a quick poll of voters revealed today, but there is no clear choice to replace him with a 'don't know', still the answer among one in five Tory members. And more bad news for the Prime Minister is that it is now the first time in his tenure that Tory voters would rather see him go than stay in 10th place. Mr Johnson is fighting for his political life today as a rebel MP tries to deal the killing blow following the dramatic resignations of Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid. The prime minister faces a brutal day after the bombings and a host of other, more recent departures, wielding the gauntlet of the PMQs at midday before the powerful liaison committee grills for three hours - including some of its harshest critics. And it seems public support for him is also waning - including among Tory voters who catapulted him to Downing Street on a Brexit wave three years ago. A YouGov poll of 3,000 people last night found that most Conservative voters in 2019 (54%) now want to see the PM resign as well. But despite public desire for the Prime Minister to be ousted from Number 10, far fewer Brits expect Johnson to leave voluntarily. A recent poll by the influential ConservativeHome website has revealed that Ben Wallace and Penny Mordaunt are the favorites among Tory members if and when a new leadership election begins. Liz Truss is in third place, followed by Tom Tugendhat and Nadhim Zahawi. Far off the pace is Rishi Sunak in ninth place and Sajid Javid in 12th. But editor Paul Goodman said that "I don't know, scored 20 percent or more in most competitions. That means the contenders in most pairings would have a fifth of the votes to try and pressure them if the competition were real. When it comes to Rishi Sunak, most Brits believe the chancellor's resignation was right (56%), with Conservative voters tending to agree at 47% versus 24%. Mr Sunak remains common favorite to be the next Tory leader with Penny Mordaunt at 4/1. Secretary of Defense Ben Wallace is at 8/1, same odds as Liz Truss. New Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi is at 9/1 but he is the only candidate whose odds are falling at a great many bookmakers. Jeremy Hunt is next at 10/1 but a recent poll of Tory members showed he would lose to all the main candidates in a run-off. Ben Wallace led a key poll of Conservatives over who should replace Boris Johnson as the next party leader after he helped respond to the Ukraine crisis. The Cabinet Secretary has just ousted his predecessor Penny Mordaunt to first place in the poll by the influential ConservativeHome website. Foreign Secretary Liz Truss was the third most popular Tory member to become Prime Minister. But Rishi Sunak - long regarded as Mr Johnson's most likely successor - has fallen dramatically out of favor with the Conservative base following the controversy over his family's finances and tax affairs. He hopes his resignation will help. Of the 755 people polled, Mr Wallace - who is at the forefront of Britain's response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine - was backed by more than 15 per cent of those polled. His popularity has increased dramatically since Vladimir Putin launched his barbaric attack on Russia's neighbors, despite the fact that the defense minister fell victim to a prank call from Russian scammers in the first weeks of the conflict. When ConservativeHome last asked Tory members in December last year who they would prefer to be the next leader of the party, Mr Wallace was not even mentioned by respondents. Mr Wallace also cited a separate monthly ConservativeHome poll of Tory members when asked how satisfied they were with the performance of Cabinet ministers. He had a net satisfaction rate of more than 85 per cent, while Mr Johnson stayed at the bottom of the table at -21 per cent for the second straight month. Ms Mordaunt, who was Mr Wallace's predecessor at the Defense Ministry and is now Trade Secretary, was the second most popular among Tory members as a future leader. In opinion polls, Labor has held a small but consistent lead over the Conservatives over the past seven months. Sir Keir Starmer's party first advanced in the polls in early December 2021, around the time stories of partying at Downing Street during the Covid-19 lockdown first emerged. Before that point Labor had spent much of the last few years lagging far behind the government. Based on a seven-day moving average of all published national polls, Labor held 39% of the vote on July 5, ahead of the Conservatives at 33%, the Liberal Democrats at 13% and the Greens at 6%. A year ago the Conservatives averaged 41%, Labor 33%, the Lib Dems 9% and the Greens 5%. Opinion polls are snapshots of prevailing public sentiment, not projections or forecasts. With the next general election still more than two years away - the latest possible date is January 23, 2025 - there is plenty of time to change the national figures. But polls shape and reflect the prevailing mood in the country, which in turn affects the morale of politicians and party members. The news for the Conservatives is similarly grim when looking at Boris Johnson's popularity ratings. The prime minister's net favorable rating - the difference between the proportion of people who say they have a positive opinion of him and those who say they have a negative opinion - has been at or near an all-time low since January. It is currently at minus 51 points, according to figures from the opinion research institute YouGov. Boris Johnson has had negative favorable ratings for most of his tenure apart from a few weeks in spring 2020 at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. Ministers Ben Wallace, Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak tipped to join former high-flyers Jeremy Hunt and Penny Mordaunt to become Prime Minister Dominik Raab. The South West Norfolk MP has held a number of cabinet posts under successive party leaders and is popular with the party base. Before the February 24 invasion, she visited Russia for talks with her Kremlin counterpart Sergei Lavrov, in which she openly channeled the style of Margaret Thatcher on a similar trip 35 years ago. But she was a bit attacked by Putin's attack dog, who said their conversations were like "deaf people talking to blind people". She was also criticized early in the conflict for urging the British to fight for Russia even if they had no military experience, advice later contradicted by senior military figures. But the 2016 Remain voter has become a born-again Brexiteer in the years since, which will help her every vote. As Foreign Secretary, she has taken on responsibility for negotiating changes to the Brexit deal with the EU to resolve the political impasse in Northern Ireland. Jeremy Hunt: Former cabinet minister looking to try again after losing to Boris in 2019 Jeremy Hunt lost heavily to Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election that followed Theresa May's resignation. But he shows no sign of letting himself be dissuaded from the abuses at the hands of Tory members three years later. The former minister-turned-chair of the Health Committee has conducted a number of high-profile health policy interventions in recent weeks. And he has consistently refused to rule out running to replace Boris Johnson if he quits. He tweeted ahead of the no-confidence vote: "Today's decision is change or lose. I will vote for change.” He previously declined to say whether Boris Johnson was “honest” when he warned the PM has a “big mountain to climb” to win back Tory voters. The South West Surrey MP questioned the Prime Minister's ability to prove another Tory vote-winner as he insisted it would be a "mistake" to dismiss the party's local election losses as "mid-term blues". But the former cabinet minister insisted now was not the time for renewed efforts to oust Mr Johnson, saying he "hopes" the PM would lead the Tories to the next general election. The comments were seen as a warning shot to the Prime Minister - and a clear message to Tory MPs - that he is waiting in the wings should Mr Johnson continue to stumble. Like Truss, he is a former Remain voter who converted to Brexit. Ben Wallace: Hawkisher Defense Secretary who spoke harshly about "Tonto" Putin * He is currently the most popular minister in the Tory grassroots * Sandhurst-educated father of three has spearheaded efforts to arm Ukraine to stave off Russian invasion Currently the most popular Tory-based minister, according to the Conservative Home website. The secretary of defense's understated profile has come to the fore as he emerged as one of the cabinet's leading hawks in the Ukraine war. The 52-year-old former Scots Guards officer has been at the forefront of efforts to provide Kyiv with arms and expertise to repel the Russian invasion, which has strengthened his support base and profile. The Sandhurst-educated father-of-three has overcome a Russian attempt to humiliate him after a Kremlin-backed prankster managed to get hold of him in a video call, parts of which were later broadcast on YouTube. He has also avoided being implicated in the worst failures of last summer's British disengagement from Afghanistan, with blame generally being laid on the Foreign Office. He tweeted ahead of Boris' no-confidence vote: "In 2019, Boris won by a majority of 80. "Regarding Covid, in Ukraine he helped deliver a world-leading response. Rishi Sunak: Once high-flying Chancellor who has now resigned *Chancellor was a first-class minister at the end of 2021 following Covid generosity *He resigned from role and Chancellor of the Exchequer tonight *Wife turns out to be non-Dom taxpayer living at Downing Street* Sunak himself also had questions about owning the US green card. Now, at the end of 2021, the chancellor was the number one candidate to succeed Boris Johnson. His generosity with taxpayers' money during the Covid crisis - furlough payments and other measures - and slick social media campaigns endeared him widely within the party and with the wider electorate. It was a rapid rise to the top for a minister who became chancellor just weeks before lockdown began in early 2020. But Brand Rishi's popularity has plummeted in 2022 amid a series of controversies and rows with No. 10 - culminating in his retirement tonight. Giving up his role and abandoning Boris could help salvage his tarnished reputation. It was revealed in the spring that his multi-millionaire heiress Akshata Murty was living in Downing Street while she held non-Dom tax status. She has legally avoided paying a huge UK tax bill by paying £30,000 a year to register as an Indian resident. It was later revealed that Mr. Sunak, a father of two and a former international banker, himself held a US green card for a year during his tenure as Treasury Secretary. While the status wouldn't save him any money on his tax bill, he does have a responsibility to make the United States "your permanent home." There have also been a number of rows with No10 following recovery expenses and his involvement with Partygate: he was fined £50 for attending Boris Johnson's surprise - and foul - birthday party at No10 in June 2020, although he claimed he was just passing through on his way to a meeting. His supporters accused No10 of embroiling him in the controversy, which soured an already acidic relationship within Downing Street. * Trade Secretary and Royal Navy Reservist who supported Jeremy Hunt in 2019 * Ignored other ministers who tweeted support for PM to write about D-Day instead * She was and was the first woman to serve as Defense Secretary International Trade Secretary Penny Mordaunt has already emerged as possibly one of the least subtle potential candidates to run. While other ministers tweeted their support for the Prime Minister at the time of his no-confidence vote, she pointedly tweeted... The Brexiteer, 49, a marine reservist who once appeared on reality TV in a swimsuit, is popular with party members. She was the first woman to serve as Secretary of Defense, was also International Trade Secretary and is currently Secretary of Commerce. Supporters have pushed her credentials as a potential candidate for the unit that every leadership race seems to be missing - she's a Brexit voter who backed Jeremy Hunt in 2019. Ms. Mordaunt has already been on retirement observation once this year. In January, she spoke out against a proposed £1.2billion undersea power cable project backed by a Russian oligarch and major Tory donor. Temerko, who previously ran a company that made weapons for the Russian military, and Aquind have given the Tories more than £1million and the oligarch has regularly been photographed at fundraisers with prime ministers and their cabinets. Government sources said Mordaunt is willing to quit if the cable is approved. * An army reservist who has served in Iraq and Afghanistan * Father of two said in 2017 that "it would be great to be prime minister." Another Tory MP with military experience. Tugendhat, the chairman of the foreign affairs committee, is a staunch Boris critic who has targeted the government for its stance on China and the withdrawal from Afghanistan. Some MPs believe the 48-year-old, an army reservist who has served in Iraq and Afghanistan, would be well suited for the role and represents "the best chance for a fresh start". However, some are concerned about his lack of political experience and his choice for a second posh prime minister in a row. He is the son of a High Court judge and the nephew of a Tory peer. He is the son of a High Court judge and the nephew of a Tory peer. Mr Tugendhat, who is married with two children, has previously made it clear that he would like an inclination towards the top job, saying in 2017 that it "would be great to be prime minister". When the Iraq War broke out in 2003, he was a member of the Territorial Army and was mobilized as an Arabic-speaking intelligence officer to serve in the Royal Marines. He went to Iraq as part of Operation TELIC - the first invasion. After the war he returned to a post in the City of London but then returned to Iraq to help with the country's economic recovery. Then, in 2006, the German Foreign Office asked Mr. Tugendhat to go to Afghanistan to help expand its National Security Council. The Tory MP can speak Arabic, Dari and French. The Tory MP was applauded in the House of Commons during a debate on Britain's exit from Afghanistan in August 2021 when he described his experiences in the country. He told a silent chamber: "Like many veterans, I've struggled through anger, sadness and rage this past week - through the feeling of not only having left a country, but also the sacrifice my friends have made. Nadhim Zahawi: Minister who came to Britain as a refugee child and made a fortune. Mr Zahawi is seen by some as an external choice to replace the prime minister. The education minister fled Saddam Hussein's Iraq with his family as a child. Tutored privately at King's College School in West London and at University College London, where he studied chemical engineering. As one of the wealthiest MPs, he was named “Entrepreneur of the Year” by Ernst & Young and founded the successful polling company YouGov. He is said to have a property empire worth around £100million. As one of the wealthiest MPs, he was named “Entrepreneur of the Year” by Ernst & Young and founded the successful polling company YouGov. He is said to have a property empire worth around £100million. The pro-Brexit minister enjoys the confidence of the No10 and is a regular part of the morning media round. Although he initially backed Dominic Raab as Conservative party leader in 2019, he has remained loyal to Mr Johnson ever since. Although he initially backed Dominic Raab as Conservative party leader in 2019, he has remained loyal to Mr Johnson ever since. He previously served as Minister for Children from January 2018 to July 2019, during which time he attended the controversial Presidents Club Ball. He previously served as Minister for Children from January 2018 to July 2019, during which time he attended the controversial Presidents Club Ball.

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Why did Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resign? Full resignation letters and what they said about Boris Johnson

Rishi Sunak said "our approaches are fundamentally too different" and Sajid Javid that "the British expect integrity from the government". (Author: Gardener)

Rishi SunakBoris Johnson is desperately clinging to his job in the face of a major cabinet revolt. Former Chancellor Rishi Sunak and former Health Minister Sajid Javid made sensational resignations on Tuesday night, urging the prime minister to follow suit. Mr Javid warned the government was no longer seen as "competent to act in the national interest" after a series of scandals. Minutes later, Mr Sunak accused the Prime Minister of not acting "appropriately, competently and seriously". The double resignation comes amid the government's latest scandal, after a bombshell letter from former State Department chief Simon McDonald revealed Mr Johnson had been told allegations that Chris Pincher was a sex offender before appointing him deputy head of Whip. Mr Johnson had previously denied knowing of any specific allegations of misconduct against Mr Pincher and his spokesman suggested he forgot he was briefed on the incident. Here are the full letters of resignation from Mr. Sunak and Mr. Javid. It is with deep sadness that I am writing to you to resign from the Government. It has been a tremendous privilege to serve our country as Chancellor of the Exchequer and I will always be proud of how we have protected people's jobs and businesses through measures like furlough during the pandemic. Leaving a ministerial post is a serious matter at any time. Resigning as Chancellor while the world is suffering from the economic consequences of the pandemic, the war in Ukraine and other serious challenges is a decision that I did not take lightly. However, the public rightly expects proper, competent and reputable governance. I realize this may be my last ministerial post, but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and I am therefore resigning. I have served as your Chancellor with gratitude for entrusting me with responsibility for the nation's economy and finances. Most importantly, I have respected the powerful mandate you were given by the British people in 2019 and how, under your leadership, we broke the Brexit impasse. That is the essence of the collective government that underpins our system, and it is particularly important that the Prime Minister and the Chancellor remain united in difficult times like the ones we are experiencing today. Our country faces immense challenges. We both want a high-growth economy with low taxes and world-class public services, but this can only be delivered responsibly if we are willing to work hard, make sacrifices and make tough choices. I firmly believe that the public is ready to hear this truth. Our employees know that if something is too good to be true, it isn't. In preparation for our planned joint speech on the economy next week, it has become clear to me that our approaches are fundamentally too different. I'm sad to be leaving government, but I've reluctantly come to the conclusion that we can't go on like this. It was a privilege to have been asked to return to government to serve as Secretary of State for Health and Human Services at such a critical time for our country. I put every ounce of energy into this task and I am incredibly proud of what we have achieved. Thanks to the amazing roll-out of our Booster Scheme, investment in treatments and innovation in the way we deliver healthcare, the UK enjoys more months of freedom than other comparable countries. We have also made important progress in restoring and reforming the NHS and adult social care. Longest waiters are down 70 per cent and as you know I've been working hard on a broader modernization of the NHS. I have also developed radically new approaches to dementia, cancer and mental health and prepared the White Paper on Health Inequalities, which will include plans to improve health outcomes for communities left behind for too long. Given the unprecedented magnitude of the challenges facing healthcare and human services, my instinct was to remain focused on this important work. It is therefore with great regret that I must inform you that in good conscience I can no longer serve in this government. I'm an instinctive team player, but the British are right to expect integrity from their government. The tone you set as a leader and the values ​​you hold reflect those of your peers, your party and ultimately the country. Conservatives at their best are seen as no-nonsense decision-makers guided by strong values. We may not have always been popular, but we were competent to act in the national interest. Unfortunately, I have to say that I am aware that this situation will not change under your leadership - and that you have therefore lost my trust as well. You have shed a very welcome light on the regional differences in our country, an agenda that will continue to define our politics. But the country needs a strong and principled Conservative Party, and the party is bigger than any one. I have served you faithfully and as a friend, but we all serve the country first. To conclude, I would like to express my gratitude to ministerial and department colleagues, my admiration for the NHS and social care staff and my love for my family who have been immensely patient during these challenging times.

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Sajid Javid says 'the problem starts at the top and that's not going to change' as Boris Johnson vows to 'keep going' - live

Former Health Secretary Says Commons PM Will Do Permanent Damage To Tories; PM says he will continue despite "difficult circumstances". (Author: Gardener)

Sajid JavidPlease use a supported version for the best MSN experience. Sajid Javid says 'the problem starts at the top and that's not going to change' as Boris Johnson vows to 'carry on' - live Former Health Secretary says Commons PM will cause lasting damage to Tories; PM says he will continue despite "difficult circumstances". Badenoch, O'Brien, Burghart, Rowley and Lopez all resign as ministers with joint resignation This is a first: five ministers have resigned at once, all signing a joint resignation letter which reads: "It is becoming increasingly clear that the Government in light of the problems that have come to light”. They say Boris Johnson should resign. The five ministers are: Kemi Badenoch, the Equality Minister (recently described by the ConservativeHome website as a possible outsider candidate for Tory leadership); Neil O'Brien, the rising minister; Alex Burghart, the Skills Minister; Lee Rowley, the Secretary of Commerce; and Julia Lopez, Minister for Media, Data and Digital Infrastructure. These five are considered rising stars, and so this letter is not dissimilar to the 2019 Jenrick/Sunak/Dowden article mentioned earlier. (See 2:11 p.m.) It is with regret that I resign from my position as Secretary of State for Media, Data and Digital Infrastructure. I am grateful to the Prime Minister for giving me the opportunity to serve the nation I love. pic.twitter.com/QcRvkdkISd - Julia Lopez MP (@JuliaLopezMP) July 6, 2022 At the lobby briefing after the PMQs, Boris Johnson's press secretary claimed he still had the support of a majority of his MPS. She insisted Johnson would fight another vote of confidence if it were called. Asked if the Prime Minister thought he would win, she said: "Yes." She also said appointments to replace the frontbenchers who resigned since last night would come "in the coming days". Former Cabinet Secretary Robert Jenrick says Johnson should quit because he fails to provide "grip and direction". Robert Jenrick, the former Communities Secretary, has said he now wants Boris Johnson to resign. Jenrick was fired by Johnson last fall, but he's remained reasonably loyal to the public since then. Now, in a post on his Facebook page, he says Johnson is not "providing the coherence, foothold and direction that the country needs." He says: I have always wanted the Prime Minister to be successful and I have given him every opportunity to do so. However, it has become painfully clear that we are not providing the coherence, support and direction the country needs and deserves in these challenging times. I have found it difficult to support the ever-increasing tax burden and the government's failure to enact essential reforms for our economy and public services, not least abandoning the responsibility to address the housing crisis for the benefit of future generations. In general, there has been a significant and, I fear, irreparable loss of public confidence, which has been confirmed by the mishandling of serious allegations in recent days. If we continue on our current path, we risk doing lasting damage to the Conservative Party's reputation for competence and good governance and, more importantly, to the standing of politics in general. Jenrick also says he wrote to Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 committee, that the party needed a new leader. In 2019, Johnson's leadership campaign received a significant boost when Jenrick, Rishi Sunak and Oliver Dowden wrote a joint article for The Times, saying that only Johnson, as leader, could save the party from the "deep peril" it was in located. Last night Robert Largan, the Tory MP for the very marginal High Peak in Derbyshire, first elected in 2019, tweeted a photo from a Jimmy Eat World gig with the caption: "If not now, then when?" It's a line from a song by Jimmy Eat World called For Me This is Heaven, but in context it may also provide insight into Largan's view of Johnson's position. David Johnston is stepping down as PPS in the education department, saying Johnson cannot provide the leadership the country needs. David Johnston has resigned to the Education Department as PPS. In a post on his Facebook page, he says he doesn't think Boris Johnson can give the country the leadership it needs. I have said in the House of Commons and elsewhere that we, as elected politicians, are the custodians of politics. We should uphold the highest standards and act in what is best for the country. It is very important to me that we do everything we can to encourage good people into politics so that the country is well served, but the events of the past few months have worsened the minds of politicians and politicians and will only discourage more people to go into politics, which I deeply regret. I know from my inbox that opinions differ about the Prime Minister, but I don't think he can provide the leadership the country needs. Overall, the PMQs and Sajid Javid's resignation notice for Boris Johnson were not only as bad as expected, they were a lot worse. Last night, following the resignations of Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid, it appeared that Johnson had entered the final stages of his premiership, but that the end point may not be imminent. Keir Starmer had one of his best performances against Johnson. He is often most effective when speaking as a former DPP and he has been more aggressive towards Johnson over the Chris Pincher scandal than might have been expected, presenting this not as a question of competence or honesty but as a scandal surrounding No. 10 Enabling a Sexual Predator. Johnson never really got off the ropes and it was striking how his confidence in the usual CCHQ talking points (Corbyn, Brexit, the nuclear deterrent) eroded greatly. TV is not an effective way of assessing noise levels in the chamber, but colleagues who were in the press gallery said the silence from those who would normally support the prime minister was striking. Sajid Javid is a less polished Commons speaker than Starmer, but his speech, while not quite Geoffrey Howe, was way above wet Squid (unlike his last resignation statement). Interestingly, he accused people "at the highest level" on Johnson's team of lying to him about Partygate. It's hard to say what impact the speech will have on Johnson's hopes of staying in office, but it's probably better seen as a prelude to Javid's campaign for Tory leadership, and in that regard it was undoubtedly a success. I didn't stop when I was told guys like me couldn't do math. I didn't quit when old school bankers said I didn't have the right school ties. I didn't stop when people in my community told me I couldn't marry the love of my life. And he chastised ministers who have not resigned, telling MPs: I've come to the conclusion that the problem starts at the top and I don't think that's going to change and that means for those of us it is is in a position to take responsibility for making this change. I know how difficult this choice is, but let's get this straight; not doing something is an active choice. During PMQs, Tory MP Gary Sambrook said Johnson told colleagues in the Commons tearoom yesterday: “There were seven people, MPs, at the Carlton Club last week and one of them should have tried to intervene to take Chris [Pincher] stop drinking that much”. Sambook continued: As if that wasn't offensive enough to the people who tried to intervene that night. Isn't it the example that the Prime Minister is constantly trying to divert attention from the issue, always trying to blame others for mistakes and that he has no choice but to take responsibility and resign? And it explains why support for Johnson is fading. Javid says, "The problem starts at the top and that's not going to change." Javid says when the first Partygate stories surfaced last year, he was personally reassured at the highest level by Johnson's team that there were no parties at No. 10 . He says he gave interviews in which he said that. He says there was further evidence that #10 was not truthful. You get to a point where “enough is enough,” he says. He says he welcomes Johnson's apology last night. He says something is fundamentally wrong at the top. You can only cycle this machine on and off so many times before you realize something is fundamentally wrong. The problem starts at the top and that's not going to change. He gave the prime minister one last chance, but he says he's had enough now. He says fellow ministers will have their own reasons for staying. He suggests that Johnson's leadership will damage the party's reputation going forward. He says he is dismayed at reports of harassment in Parliament. He says he got into politics to do something, not to be someone. With two ministerial resignations - Will Quince and Robin Walker - and a promotion from Michelle Donelan to Education Secretary, the Department of Education is set to see another change in leadership at a time when the Department is grappling with multiple bills and high-profile deliberations. Geoff Barton, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: "While we warmly welcome Michelle Donelan as Education Secretary and wish her well in her new role, we must express our concern at the high turnover rate in education secretaries. This is the sixth incumbent in eight years and the third during Boris Johnson's tenure. Education is a vital public service and a complex sector that requires deep understanding, knowledge and continuity. This constant chopping and switching doesn't provide stable leadership. Donelan's inbox is full of tough issues, including rewriting the deadlocked school bill, lobbying her old boss Nadhim Zahawi for a teachers' pay deal with a much-needed announcement, holding a consultation on childcare quotas while pursuing the details of the Special Needs and Disabilities Green Paper. From her old job as university minister, despite her shortcomings, Donelan will continue to push the long-delayed Free Speech in Higher Education Act into legislation and complete the overhaul of the student loan system due to come into effect next year and the associated entitlement to lifelong learning go live in 2025. To top it all off, there's the summer high school and GCSE exam season, a source of bad headlines for ministers if results fall, but officials are hoping that's for the worst. Tory MP Lee Anderson says he can no longer support Johnson, arguing "integrity should always come first". Conservative MP Lee Anderson has said he can no longer support Boris Johnson. That's because Gullis, a "Red Wall" Tory who was first elected MP for Stoke-on-Trent North, Kidsgrove & Talke in 2019, was until recently a very vocal and enthusiastic supporter of Johnson. He does not have long allegiance to the Conservatives; He was a Labor Party member for years, even working for Gloria De Piero, the Labor MP in Ashfield, the seat he won for the Tories in 2019. But - until now at least - he has been a passionate advocate of Johnson's Brexity, anti-wake, leveling-up version of Toryism. It has emerged that in the past the Prime Minister was made aware of a complaint regarding Mr Pincher's inappropriate behavior but then promoted Mr Pincher to Deputy Chief Whip, which is a position of immense power within government and a role that it should take care of the interests of the government and the welfare of the deputies. It is quite obvious that this was not a good appointment and to make matters worse Number 10 did not act quickly enough by removing the stick after Mr Pincher resigned. It was then denied that the Prime Minister had been informed of Mr Pincher's previous conduct, but after a former senior official challenged this number 10 allegation, he said the Prime Minister had forgotten he had been informed. I believe our PM got all the big decisions right and got us through the most difficult time of my life and I have always given him my full support. Said integrity should always come first and unfortunately this hasn't been the case in the past few days. Will Quince resigns as minister, saying he has 'no choice' after using false information from No10 in interviews. And Will Quince has resigned as Minister for Children and Families. Quince defended Boris Johnson in interviews on Monday and he says he resigned because he used false information in the interviews he received from No 10. Quince said he received a "categorical assurance" from No. 10 that Johnson was unaware of any "specific" allegation made against Pincher when he appointed him to the post of deputy chief whip earlier this year. Quince says in his resignation letter that he spoke to Johnson last night and that Johnson issued a "sincere apology." But Quince says he still has to resign because he repeated what he was told "in good faith" by No. 10. Basically, he's saying he considers saying things that aren't true to the public a matter of resignation - although it's not his fault. There are many of his peers who do not apply the same standard and who misinformed viewers based on a #10 briefing, but have not resigned. In his letter, Quince says: Thank you for meeting me last night and for your sincere apologies for the briefings I received from No 10 ahead of Monday's media round, which we now know are inaccurate. It is with great sadness and regret that I feel that I have no choice but to offer my resignation as Minister for Children and Families, having accepted and reiterated these assurances in good faith. It is with great sadness and regret that I submitted my resignation to the Prime Minister this morning after accepting and repeating to the media on Monday assurances that have now been shown to be false. I wish my successor all the best - it's the best job in government. She told BBC Breakfast that she welcomes the resignations but it is clear that Boris Johnson "can no longer provide the leadership the country desperately needs". Echoing Starmer's comments last night, she says: "There's a lot more at stake here than just changing the person at the helm of the Conservative Party. Conservative MPs, Conservative ministers are complicit in what has happened in recent years.” On the economy, Reeves says: “The UK is stuck, the economy is at its weakest for a while, growth next year is expected to be the lowest in the G20 except for Russia.” She adds: “Hold parliamentary elections… It's time for a fresh start. Labor is ready to take that lead.” That's it from me for this morning, handing it over to my colleague Andrew Sparrow. Q: Everything the ministers told us about what #10 knew about Chris Pincher was not true. Zahawi says the PM apologized last night. "From my point of view, that's good leadership," says Zahawi (meaning to apologize for your mistake). Q: But you and he were not telling the truth when you said he was unaware of the Pincher allegations when appointing him. Zahawi says he was telling the truth to the best of his knowledge. He tries to change the subject and says they have a big challenge ahead of them. The people trying to turn the Tories against each other are people like Alastair Campbell, he says. Robinson says it's "insulting" to suggest this crisis was created by the government's opponents. Nadhim Zahawi, the new Chancellor, is now being interviewed by Nick Robinson on the Today programme. Because we face a global fight against inflation, says Zahawi. Today the biggest tax cut for individuals in ten years comes into effect (increasing the social security ceiling). Q: Don't you agree with Rishi Sunak who said that the government should be properly and competently run? And don't you agree with Sajid Javid who said the government should have integrity? Zahawi says Boris Johnson apologized over Chris Pincher appointment He says governments make decisions quickly and don't get everything right. What did Johnson's political opponents say? In response to last night's resignations, Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer said: "If they [ministers] had any integrity they would have gone months ago. The Tory party is corrupt and changing a man is not going to fix that. Only genuine change of government can give Britain the fresh start it needs.” This morning Lib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey said the Conservatives must do their “patriotic duty” and “get rid of Boris Johnson today”. He told BBC Breakfast the Tories had no "serious economic plan" for the country during a cost-of-living crisis, adding that the Liberal Democrats had "supported" tax cuts, particularly VAT. In a tweet, SNP chief Nicola Sturgeon added: "It feels like the end may be near for Johnson - not a moment too soon. It is worth noting that the resigning ministers were only willing to leave if they were lied to - they publicly defended him. Yesterday at 6pm Boris Johnson gave an interview which he hoped would stem some of the criticism of his handling of the Chris Pincher allegations. Within two minutes, Sajid Javid had resigned as health minister. Then Rishi Sunak resigned as chancellor. A total of 10 Tories submitted letters of resignation from various government posts on Tuesday night, leaving the Prime Minister fighting for his political future. Johnson tried to regain his authority by quickly appointing Nadhim Zahawi as his chancellor and Steve Barclay as health secretary. But the move's credibility was undermined when reports surfaced that Zahawi had threatened to quit if he didn't get the job in place of Secretary of State Liz Truss. The resignations of Javid and Sunak, both seen as potential future contenders for the leadership, come at a moment of great peril for the prime minister. Elections to the Executive of the 1922 Committee next week are expected to strengthen the hand of the rebels, who are hoping to call another no-confidence vote. There is growing expectation among MPs that there will be steps to change the rules to allow a second vote of confidence before the start of the summer recess on July 21, a feat previously deemed administratively impossible. At midday Johnson will face the Commons for Prime Minister's Questions - we'll bring you live updates of that and all the other political developments of the day as they happen. Next, Zahawi will be pushed for teacher salaries, energy prices and tax cuts. Zahawi says he will use all the "levers" at his disposal, but doesn't go into detail. On Boris Johnson's handling of Chris Pincher's revelations that ultimately led to yesterday's resignations, Zahawi says the Prime Minister saw - with hindsight - that appointing Pincher as Deputy Chief Whip was wrong and rightly apologizes (the video of this apology is at the top of his blog). Finally, when asked if he thinks the prime minister is a man of integrity, he (unsurprisingly) says he does. What did the new chancellor agree with the prime minister when he was appointed last night? Zahawi says his first task is to "rebuild the economy" and help people in the "global fight against inflation." The first thing we have to do is make sure we're really careful about public sector salaries, that we don't deepen inflation.” He then asks about the possibility of raising corporate taxes. Zahawi replies that he will "look at everything" but wants to make sure the UK is as competitive as possible when trying to get companies to invest in the country. Zahawi denies threat of resignation if Chancellor is not appointed The new Chancellor can be seen on Sky News. "You don't go into this job to have an easy life," says Nadhim Zahawi, adding that it would have been easier to leave than to take the position. He says we have some "big challenges ahead" and he wants to help solve them. Pressed on the allegation that he threatened to resign if he was not appointed chancellor, Zahawi denies that this was the case. "It's a team game," he says. It was the blow to Boris Johnson that every one of his backbenchers had been waiting for. Sajid Javid, the health minister, followed shortly by Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, posted their resignation letters on Twitter, criticizing the government's competence. Full resignation letters from Rishi Sunak and Sajid JavidRead more Neither specifically mentioned the sexual misconduct and partygate scandals that have dogged the government for months. Sunak, in particular, claimed that the reason for his resignation was his different approach to the economy. But the backdrop to both resignations was Johnson's disastrous handling of the Chris Pincher affair after he admitted to appointing his ally as deputy Chief Whip despite being told of misconduct allegations against him. Just seconds earlier, Johnson had told cameras he apologized for his mistakes in appointing Pincher and he had toured the House of Commons tea room and said that "everyone deserves a second chance". The problem is that Johnson doesn't have his second chance, but a number much higher than after scandals like Partygate, Tory donors funding his home renovations, his overruling of Security Service advice to give Evgeny Lebedev a peerage , and trying to rewrite the standards system. The two big resignations did not result in an immediate further spate of cabinet ministers critical of Johnson, but Tory MPs still believe it means the end is near for the prime minister. Related: Boris Johnson lags behind for now, but for how much longer? Pound falls to lowest since pandemic began as No10 staggers from crisis - business is live

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Who is running the crumbling economy right now?'

Treasury is disoriented as Chancellor dramatically resigns and Boris Johnson's government descends into deeper chaos (Author: Gardener)

TreasuryThe British economy was disoriented on Tuesday night after Rishi Sunak dramatically resigned as Chancellor of the Exchequer. It leaves the Treasury with a leadership vacuum at the worst possible time as the economy heads into recession and Boris Johnson's PM is thrown into chaos. The prime minister sought to name a successor to Mr Sunak on Tuesday night, but few names are in the running to take the job as other cabinet members are reportedly considering their positions after a string of highly damaging scandals. However, the minister reportedly withdrew from Wednesday morning's media round, suggesting he too may have lost confidence in Mr Johnson. Sunak's predecessor as chancellor, Sajid Javid, also resigned from his position as health minister on Tuesday. Whoever takes the top Treasury job will inherit one of the worst economic situations Britain has faced in living memory. The economy contracted in April and living standards have fallen in each of the last four quarters, official figures show. The new chancellor will have to contend with both four decades of high inflation and rising interest rates, which are straining household finances and driving up government borrowing costs. The Bank of England warned on Tuesday that the outlook for both Britain and the global economy had "deteriorated significantly" amid rising prices fueled by Russia's invasion of Ukraine. in a Tory party that has seen increasingly apparent divisions. While Mr Sunak has tried to portray himself as a firm low-tax Tory, he has been pushed to announce an unprecedented wave of government spending during the pandemic, and then through a cost-cutting living crisis. Mr Sunak's recent tenure as Treasury chief has been marked by disputes with the Prime Minister over government spending. In announcing his retirement, Sunak said: "I firmly believe that the public is ready to hear this truth. “You need to know that while there is a path to a better future, it is not an easy one. In preparation for our planned joint speech on the economy next week, it has become clear to me that our approaches are fundamentally too different.” The scathing letter came minutes after Sunak's cabinet colleague Sajd Javid resigned as health minister, targeting the prime minister's behavior. "The tone you set as a leader, the values ​​you hold, reflect your colleagues, your party and ultimately the country," the former health minister wrote. However, I regret to say that I realize that under your leadership this situation will not change.” The Tory party is corrupt and changing a man will not fix that. Only genuine change of government can give Britain the fresh start it needs.” Another former Mr Johnson ally, Oliver Dowden, resigned as party leader after by-elections in Tiverton, Honiton and Wakefield, which the Tories lost by a wide margin.

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Boris Johnson is set to face MPs as he fights for the future after a string of ministerial resignations

The Prime Minister is under pressure to resign as Home Office Secretary Victoria Atkins is the latest senior Tory to step down (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonThe Prime Minister is under pressure to resign as Home Office Secretary Victoria Atkins is the latest senior Tory to step down. Tragically empty Tory benches for PMQs today, this is getting so embarrassing - Noa Hoffman (@hoffman_noa) July 6, 2022 People often dismiss it as a pointless ritual. But it works as a test of a leader's authority among their own MPs, and if a majority of Conservative MPs haven't given up on Boris Johnson, that should be obvious. Nadhim Zahawi has hinted that as chancellor he will unleash a tax cut and government spending frenzy in his morning interviews, according to the Times' Steven Swinford. Nadhim Zahawi's show this morning is being billed by some in Whitehall as the most expensive in history - if it comes to that he has strongly hinted that the rise in corporation tax from 19% to 25% will be reversed - £16bn per year. He also leaned on the income tax cut - £5bn a year - Steven Swinford (@Steven_Swinford) July 6, 2022 Nadhim Zahawi also pledged to honor his commitment to a 5.1% pay rise for teachers. If this were repeated across the public sector we would be talking about £12 in the region. Worth £15billion considering the spending review only accounted for pay rises of 3% across the board - Steven Swinford (@Steven_Swinford) July 6, 2022 The Conservative 1922 Committee is making contingency plans for a leadership contest due to start next week, reports Jason Groves from the Mail. According to Tory sources, the 1922 Committee is due to start drawing up contingency plans for attacks on leadership as early as Monday. Would allow time to complete the runoff before the break, with Tory members voting on the last two in August. But would require the PM to be gone this week... — Jason Groves (@JasonGroves1) July 6, 2022 Boris Johnson exits No. 10 ahead of the PMQs this morning. Photo: John Sibley/Reuters Bloomberg's Kitty Donaldson says the Conservative 1922 Committee may decide to change the rules to allow Boris Johnson a second no-confidence vote next week. A new executive branch with an anti-Johnson majority is expected to be elected next week, but the current executive branch has until recently been fairly evenly split between loyalists and critics. But the pool of Johnson loyalists is shrinking by the hour. EXC: The 1922 committee will meet at 5:00 p.m. and if it has a quorum to change the rules of leadership it will do so and there could be a vote on Johnson's leadership next week. pic.twitter.com/1IuVPcwwYU - Paul Brand (@PaulBrandITV) July 6, 2022 Tory MP Tom Hunt says after backing PM in first confidence vote he now wants him to win another Tory MP from 2019 recording , Tom Hunt, has declared has no more confidence in Boris Johnson. In a post on his Facebook page, Hunt, who represents Ipswich, says he supported Johnson until recently and believed at the time of the last no-confidence vote that Johnson "deserved some space to try and turn things around and the confidence." win back both the public and the parliamentary Conservative Party". But now he's changed his mind, says Hunt. The events of the past week were the drop that broke the camel's back. In a way, one of the worst things about the revelations at the Carlton Club last week was how unsurprising they came to many colleagues. I personally find it hard to believe that the Prime Minister was unaware of the level of concern about the former deputy chief whip. I firmly believe that the situation that unfolded last week could have been avoided and I also think the way it was handled was deeply disappointing. With two ministerial resignations - Will Quince and Robin Walker - and a promotion from Michelle Donelan to Education Secretary, the Department of Education is set to see another change in leadership at a time when the Department is grappling with multiple bills and high-profile deliberations. Geoff Barton, General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said: "While we warmly welcome Michelle Donelan as Education Secretary and wish her well in her new role, we must express our concern at the high turnover rate in education secretaries. Education is a vital public service and a complex sector that requires deep understanding, knowledge and continuity. This constant chopping and switching doesn't provide stable leadership. Donelan's inbox is full of tough issues, including rewriting the deadlocked school bill, lobbying her old boss Nadhim Zahawi for a teachers' pay deal with a much-needed announcement, holding a consultation on childcare quotas while pursuing the details of the Special Needs and Disabilities Green Paper. From her old job as university minister, despite her shortcomings, Donelan will continue to push the long-delayed Free Speech in Higher Education Act into legislation and complete the overhaul of the student loan system due to come into effect next year and the associated entitlement to lifelong learning go live in 2025. To top it all off, there's the summer high school and GCSE exam season, a source of bad headlines for ministers if results fall, but officials are hoping that's for the worst.

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Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi says it's 'easy to walk away' as he replaces Rishi Sunak

The former education secretary says it is "much harder to deliver" than to step down as more junior ministers announce their resignation. (Author: Gardener)

Nadhim ZahawiNadhim Zahawi says it's "easy to walk away from government" but "much harder to deliver for the country" as the new chancellor dismissed reports he threatened to leave cabinet if he didn't position in the Treasury Department. Speaking to Sky News' Kay Burley on his first full day in the role, he said he supports Boris Johnson as Prime Minister, adding: "Today's government team is the team that will deliver." But his predecessor, Mr Sunak, and Health Minister Sajid Javid both resigned from Cabinet last night, saying they had lost confidence in the Prime Minister and that "standards are worth fighting for". Politics Hub: More resignations earlier in the day as pressure mounts on PM - live updates They were followed out the door by a bevy of other junior ministers and Attorney General Alex Chalk, who said his job could not "revolve around defending the untenable." extend". This morning Children's Secretary Will Quince quit his job after being sent out to defend the Prime Minister on Monday, only to find the "repeated assurances" given to him by Number 10 "were found to be inaccurate". And Justice Secretary Victoria Atkins also resigned, saying values ​​such as "integrity, decency, respect and professionalism ... Yet Mr Johnson appears determined to remain in office, with a senior No 10 source saying he was "very, very aware that." 14 million people voted for him to get the job done and he wants to go ahead on their behalf.” However, the source admitted the Prime Minister was surprised by Mr Sunak's resignation while being warned Mr Javid was coming. Mr Zahawi dismissed reports he threatened to resign if he was not given the chancellorship in the forced reshuffle, telling Kay Burley: "No, I didn't threaten to resign at all. And the Chancellor insisted he believed the Prime Minister was acting with integrity, saying his boss was "determined to deliver for this country". Mr Johnson will later face his backbenchers and opposition MPs at the Prime Minister's Questions before being grilled by the Liaison Committee on issues such as integrity in politics. The resignation drama came last night after Mr Johnson apologized for hiring his former deputy chief whip Chris Pincher, despite knowing he had faced complaints of inappropriate behavior back in 2019. The apology comes after days of changing messages from Number 10 about hiring and dealing with Mr Pincher, who resigned last week after being accused of groping two men at a private members' club in London. The first to announce his departure was Mr Javid, who said in his scathing letter of resignation that he "can no longer serve in good conscience in this government". Mr Sunak followed 10 minutes later, writing: "The public rightly expects the government to be properly, competently and reputably run to resign." Read more: "The public is ready to hear the truth": Sunak and Javid's resignation letters in full-length of her Facebook page: "Trust in politics is - and always must - be paramount, but unfortunately that has been lost in recent months." Backbench Tories have also expressed their anger at Mr Johnson, sir Roger Gale told Sky News the Prime Minister had "a great instinct for self-preservation" but was doing "colossal damage" to the party. But Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries said the Prime Minister was "consistently getting all the big decisions right," while Brexit Chancellery Secretary Jaco b Rees-Mogg said his victory in the 2019 general election "shouldn't be taken away from him because a number of people are stepping down." A senior source at Number 10 also said Mr Zahawi's appointment to the Treasury Ministry reflected a change in economic strategy Nadhim Zahawi, 55, a longtime Conservative Party member, was appointed chancellor after Rishi Sunak's dramatic resignation Served in various junior ministerial posts, his success as vaccine minister was promoted to education minister in Boris Johnson's last reshuffle.Mr Zahawi was born in Baghdad to Iraqi Kurds and fled with his family to Britain as a child to escape Saddam Hussein when the secret police marched up the stairs , and he thought he would be arrested and taken away. He also said he couldn't read English when he was 11. In May this year, he recalled being racially abused by thugs and being dunked upside down in a pond while he was in school, telling Sky's Sophy Ridge it was "pretty horrible for a kid who just arrived on these shores." . Mr Zahawi stood as the Conservative Party candidate for Stratford-upon-Avon in the 2010 general election and won. He struggled and lost two contests earlier in the same year at Devizes and also at the Suffolk Coastal - where he was defeated by his current cabinet mate Therese Coffey, Secretary of State for Work and Pensions. Despite representing Stratford for more than a decade, the MP said he felt he didn't belong. Millions of people have come out and said, 'Enough is enough, I can't breathe' In his personal speech last October, Mr Zahawi spoke about his own experience of arriving in the UK as a child refugee, saying Britain has 'a young Kurdish boy "Now it's my turn to make sure the opportunities that have changed my life are available to every child in every corner of our great country," he said.

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Boris Johnson fights for future as two more Tory ministers resign - live

Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid have led a series of resignations, most recently Children's Minister Will Quince and Schools Minister Robin Walker (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonRishi Sunak and Sajid Javid have led a series of resignations, most recently Children's Minister Will Quince and Schools Minister Robin Walker. Tory MP Robert Halfon says he now supports a change in leadership as there has been a "real loss of integrity" but that he has changed his mind in light of the Chris Pincher scandal and what No 10 has said about it. My statement on why I lost faith in the Prime Minister 👇 pic.twitter.com/NS4kxidOD1 - Robert Halfon MP ➡️Working Hard for Harlow⬅️ (@halfon4harlowMP) 6th July 2022 Boris Johnson will need to make a small reshuffle fairly soon. He needs to replace two Ministers in the Department of Education (Robin Walker and Will Quince) and he needs a new Attorney General to replace Alex Chalk. (There are also various PPSs and trade envoys who need to be replaced, but there will be no rush to make these appointments.) Johnson is due to testify before the Commons Liaison Committee at 3pm this afternoon. Robin Walker resigns as Schools Secretary and says he no longer has confidence in Prime Minister's leadership Robin Walker has resigned as Schools Secretary and says he no longer has confidence in Boris Johnson's leadership. Walker was Minister of State in the Department of Education. Tory, a prominent One Nation father, Peter Walker, was a minister in Margaret Thatcher's cabinet (although he is considered 'wet'). In his letter, Walker says he viewed Johnson as "the instinctive conservative of a nation" but thought the government was now making too many mistakes. I tendered my resignation from Government today and I look forward to supporting @Conservatives and standing up for #Worcester from the back benches. Working to support our brilliant schools has been a privilege ) 6 July 2022 Yesterday Conservative MP Andrew Murrison resigned as the Government's Trade Representative, saying he thought Boris Johnson's position was 'unrecoverable'. But he said he had gotten to the point where he decided "enough is enough". "Enough is enough," she said repeatedly at PMQs last week when arguing that the PM should go. Murrison said the mood among Tory MPs was "feverish". Will Quince resigns as minister, saying he has 'no choice' after using false information from No10 in interviews. And Will Quince has resigned as Minister for Children and Families. Quince defended Boris Johnson in interviews on Monday and he says he resigned because he used false information in the interviews he received from No 10. Quince said he received a "categorical assurance" from No. 10 that Johnson was unaware of any "specific" allegation made against Pincher when he appointed him to the post of deputy chief whip earlier this year. Quince says in his resignation letter that he spoke to Johnson last night and that Johnson issued a "sincere apology." But Quince says he still has to resign because he repeated what he was told "in good faith" by No. 10. There are many of his peers who do not apply the same standard and who misinformed viewers based on a #10 briefing, but have not resigned. In his letter, Quince says: Thank you for meeting me last night and for your sincere apologies for the briefings I received from No 10 ahead of Monday's media round, which we now know are inaccurate. It is with great sadness and regret that I feel that I have no choice but to offer my resignation as Minister for Children and Families, having accepted and reiterated these assurances in good faith.

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Full letters of resignation from Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid

Full resignation letters from Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid - (Author: Gardener)

Rishi SunakRishi Sunak and Sajid Javid tendered their resignations Tuesday night. Boris Johnson's prime minister's office faced a new crisis with Mr Sunak and Mr Javid resigning within minutes. It came after the Prime Minister apologized for not sacking Chris Pincher when told about the allegations against him as Foreign Office Secretary in 2019. Tuesday night Mr Sunak resigned as Chancellor while Mr Javid resigned as Health Secretary. It was a privilege to have been asked to return to government to serve as Secretary of State for Health and Welfare at such a critical time for our country. I put every ounce of energy into this task and I am incredibly proud of what we have achieved. Thanks to the amazing roll-out of our Booster Scheme, investment in treatments and innovation in the way we deliver healthcare, the UK enjoys more months of freedom than other comparable countries. We have also made important progress in restoring and reforming the NHS and adult social care. Longest waiters are down 70% and as you know I've been working hard on a broader modernization of the NHS. I have also pioneered radical new approaches to dementia, cancer and mental health and prepared the White Paper on Health Disparities, which will include plans to improve health outcomes for communities left behind for too long. Given the unprecedented magnitude of the challenges facing healthcare and human services, my instinct was to remain focused on this important work. It is therefore with great regret that I must inform you that in good conscience I can no longer serve in this government. I'm an instinctive team player, but the British are right to expect integrity from their government. The tone you set as a leader and the values ​​you hold reflect those of your peers, your party and ultimately the country. Conservatives at their best are seen as no-nonsense decision-makers guided by strong values. I spoke to the Prime Minister to offer my resignation as Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. It has been a tremendous privilege to serve in this role, but I regret that I can no longer continue in good conscience. Last month's vote of confidence showed that a large number of our colleagues agreed. It was a moment of humility, grip and realignment. Unfortunately, I have to say that I am aware that this situation will not change under your leadership - and that you have therefore lost my trust as well. You have shed a very welcome light on the regional differences in our country, an agenda that will continue to define our politics. These are laudable legacies in unprecedented times. But the country needs a strong and principled Conservative Party, and the party is bigger than any one. I have served you faithfully and as a friend, but we all serve the country first. To conclude, I would like to express my gratitude to ministerial and department colleagues, my admiration for the NHS and social care staff and my love for my family who have been immensely patient during these challenging times. It is with deep sadness that I am writing to you to resign from the Government. It has been a tremendous privilege to serve our country as Chancellor of the Exchequer and I will always be proud of how we have protected people's jobs and businesses through measures like furlough during the pandemic. Leaving a ministerial post is a serious matter at any time. Resigning as Chancellor while the world is suffering from the economic consequences of the pandemic, the war in Ukraine and other serious challenges is a decision that I did not take lightly. However, the public rightly expects proper, competent and reputable governance. I realize this may be my last ministerial post, but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and I am therefore resigning. I have served as your Chancellor with gratitude for entrusting me with responsibility for the nation's economy and finances. Most importantly, I have respected the powerful mandate you were given by the British people in 2019 and how, under your leadership, we broke the Brexit impasse. That's why I've always tried to compromise in order to deliver what you want to achieve. That is the essence of the collective government that underpins our system, and it is particularly important that the Prime Minister and the Chancellor remain united in difficult times like the ones we are experiencing today. Our country faces immense challenges. We both want a high-growth economy with low taxes and world-class public services, but this can only be delivered responsibly if we are willing to work hard, make sacrifices and make tough choices. I firmly believe that the public is ready to hear this truth. Our employees know that if something is too good to be true, it isn't. In preparation for our planned joint speech on the economy next week, it has become clear to me that our approaches are fundamentally too different. I'm sad to be leaving government, but I've reluctantly come to the conclusion that we can't go on like this.

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Boris Johnson is struggling to survive as resignations continue

PM reshuffles his cabinet, ignoring those who say it's "over". (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonList of those who have resigned - and what they said about Boris Johnson Boris Johnson is fighting to save his position as Prime Minister after two cabinet resignations and a series of government departures threatened to force him out of No10. The resignations continued on Wednesday morning Rishi Sunak resigned as Chancellor on Tuesday, along with Sajid Javid, who resigned as Health Secretary - with Will Quince as Minister for Children and Families and Laura Trott as Parliamentary Private Secretary for the Department of Transport Dominic Raab, Liz Truss, Michael Gove , Therese Coffey and Ben Wallace, with University Secretary Michelle Donelan taking over the education portfolio now 12 months. But before that, Mr Johnson will be grilled by MPs on all sides of the House on Wednesday at the Prime Minister's Questions today while he is later questioned by the Commons Liaison Committee. My new role will be evidence-led, vow Zahawi Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi has said he will be evidence-led in his new role. He denied that he was appointed to the post because he believes tax cuts are needed to kick-start the economy and then growth again." That is paramount to this Chancellor and I am committed to delivering and I will happy to come back to your program."It's my first day on the job, I really want to get some good company." Wahl" after appearing on TV to defend Boris Johnson with briefings from Downing Street "which have now been revealed to be inaccurate". The letter read: “Dear Prime Minister. Thank you for meeting me last night and for your sincere apologies for the briefings I received from No 10 ahead of Monday's media round which we now know to be inaccurate for children and families because I have accepted and repeated these representations in good faith. Making this decision was not easy for me. It pains me greatly to leave a job I love where we work every day to improve the life chances of vulnerable and disadvantaged children and youth in our country. "I will miss it dearly but promise to do everything in my power to continue this important work from the back benches. "I would like to take this opportunity to express my sincere thanks to the hundreds of dedicated and hard-working officers with wh It has been a pleasure to work with.” Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi has endured a difficult first few hours in office – after two ministerial resignations while being broadcast live on BBC Radio 4. After being told the news of Will Quince's resignation, Mr Zahawi says: "I'm sorry to see Will Quince go, he was a great minister. All I want to say to colleagues is that people are not voting for split teams."The Minister for Children and Families, Will Quince, has resigned from the Government He tweeted: "It is with great sadness and regret that I submitted my resignation to the Prime Minister this morning after I faced Monday's had accepted and repeated assurances via the media that have now been shown to be inaccurate. "I wish my successor well - it's the best job in government." It is with great sadness and regret that I submitted my resignation to the Prime Minister this morning after accepting and repeating assurances to the media on Monday that have now turned out to be have proved inaccurate. I wish my successor all the best - it's the best job in government. pic.twitter.com/65EOmHd47pNo comment from Javid after shock resignation Former Health Secretary Sajid Javid left his home in south-west London on Wednesday morning without discussing his shock resignation from Cabinet. A smiling Mr Javid, who had resigned on Tuesday night, emerged from his home in Fulham and into the glare of waiting press cameras around 8.15am. He said, "Tomorrow, thanks for coming. It's nice to see you.” The parliamentary private secretary in the Ministry of Transport has announced her resignation. "Trust in politics is - and always must - be paramount, but unfortunately this has been lost in recent months," she said. Tory MP has admitted that the Chris Pincher scandal and the minister's resignation "will have an impact on us in the elections". There is considerable concern about what you are hearing from the Prime Minister and the last few days have increased this to a degree that I am not sure is even justifiable. t on.” For those of us who are Members of Parliament, it is absolutely right that we make sure that we hold government to account on these matters. That's exactly what we're going to do.” Watch: Zahawi says he'll “look at everything” on corporate tax issues 1922 committee could change confidence vote rules, says MPChris Loder said 1922 committee will Prime "consider". Minister Boris Johnson survived a recent no-confidence vote and hinted the rules could be changed to allow for an earlier vote. The Tory MP for West Dorset told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "Not necessarily today, but we do know that there is an upcoming 1922 Executive Committee election." Of course it is in the Executive Committee's gift to make changes to these to make rules if they wish, and we've gotten to a democratic point within the Conservative Party itself to actually return an Executive Committee reflective of the views of the back benches. "I have no idea who's going to run, I suspect we will hear a little more about it over the next day or so. I certainly think now that those running for the 1922 Committee ex The Executive should consider that course of action now.” Pressed specifically on his corporate tax plans, Mr Zahawi said: “I'll look at everything. I want to be one of the most competitive countries in the world to invest in. “I know that boards of directors around the world make long-term investment decisions, and the only tax they can compare around the world is corporate income tax. "I want to make sure we're as competitive as possible while maintaining fiscal discipline." The majority of Conservatives "want to see change", says Tory MPTory MP for West Dorset Chris Loder has said he believes in the "majority" of people in the Conservative Party want to see "change" after a turbulent week. He told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "I am pleased to see that some in Cabinet have acted accordingly." But now I think there is a majority in the party that wants to see change. “Personally, I have now lost confidence in the Prime Minister and I am very sorry to say that. I think he must go.” I think if he decides against it, the 1922 Committee should act and I would certainly support that approach in the upcoming 1922 election.” Mr Zahawi's says the Prime Minister was "focused on delivery". He told BBC Breakfast: "This is my first day on the job. I'll come back as soon as I review the evidence and talk about how we're going to reduce inflation." Asked about a YouGov poll that found 69 percent of voters want the prime minister to step down, he said: " Polls are a snapshot of public opinion at that moment. “Look at the people who are goading us and want to change leadership – people like Alastair Campbell. Wherever he is, we have to be on the other side of the argument.” New Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi on Wednesday promised further tax cuts as Boris Johnson struggled to survive, writes Nicholas Cecil. He stressed that the crisis-ridden prime minister had tasked him with "rebuilding" and "growth" the economy. "The most important thing is to rebuild the economy after the pandemic and restart growth, as well as tax cuts," he told Sky News. "We are delivering the first tax cut in a decade today I am committed to doing more." Mr Zahawi says the Prime Minister has rightly apologized for his handling of the Chris Pincher scandal. “The PM gave an interview last night where he spoke about making a mistake in appointing Chris Pinscher. This government is determined to ensure that no one abuses their position. “In retrospect, the Prime Minister was right to apologize and say it was the wrong appointment. "We're making decisions at warp speed in government ... we're not going to get everything right." When asked if he thinks the prime minister has integrity, he says, "Yes." Nadhim Zahawi inherits a row of cost-of-living woes after Rishi Sunak steps down as chancellor (James Manning/PA) ( PA Wire)Teachers get 9% pay rise, says ZahawiMr Zahawi says teachers entering the profession will get a 9% pay rise. ", he says. He does not further commit to increasing support for Britain if the energy price cap rises again in October. Zahawi promises "growth and reconstruction of the economy". "It's wrong to engage in power struggles, we have to unite and deliver," he says. "We need to make sure we're really prudent with public sector salaries, which could fuel inflation." Asked whether a corporate tax hike planned by Rishi Sunak would be scrapped, he added: "Nothing is off the table." New British Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi spoke to Kay Burley. Denying he threatened to resign if he doesn't get the job at No11, he says: 'You don't go into this job to have an easy life sometimes it's easy to walk away. "It's much harder for the country to deliver - look where we are today, we're facing a global fight against inflation." There are no easy answers. We have a task ahead of us to rebuild the economy.” Mr Zahawi also flatly denied any leadership ambitions, saying the prime minister was “focused on delivery”. Boris Johnson remains prime minister, according to a new YouGov poll. Just 18 percent want Mr Johnson to remain in office following the resignations of Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid, while 69 percent want him to go. Over half (54 percent) of Conservative voters want Mr Johnson to leave and just a third (33 percent) want him to stay. And just over a quarter (28 percent) of exit voters want the prime minister to remain in power. New. “Do you think Boris Johnson should step down as Prime Minister or stay?” Resignation 58% YouGov July 5 The Tories must “do their patriotic duty and get rid of PM today,” says DaveyLib Dem leader Sir Ed Davey has said the Conservatives must do their do "patriotic duty" and "get rid of Boris Johnson today". He said that when the Lib Dems defeated the Tories in the recent by-elections in Tiverton and Honiton it was "very clear" that lifelong Conservative voters were "fed up" not just with Mr Johnson but with the party as a whole . Sir Ed told BBC Breakfast: "He really needs to go and the Conservative Party needs to do their patriotic duty and get rid of Boris Johnson today." He accused the Tories of not having a "serious economic plan" for the country in a livelihood crisis, adding that the Lib Dems have "supported" tax cuts, particularly on VAT last night, the Prime Minister's behavior said during the scandal to Chris Pincher was "appalling". The Conservative MP told the BBC this morning: "I voted for the Prime Minister in the last confidence vote because he was clear that he has the right to rebuild confidence in him and in the government." In recent weeks it has been worsening, Downing Street's behavior in the Chris Pincher affair was appalling. I don't think I can defend that any longer." "The difficulty isn't in the government program... it's character and integrity at Downing Street. The people of our party and the country know that.” Britain's national newspapers had mixed reactions to the news of the resignations of former Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Health Secretary Sajid Javid - although most admit Boris Johnson's leadership is hanging by a thread . "Game over," declares the Times leader's headline, adding that it is "a mistake" for the prime minister to continue clinging to power because he has "lost the confidence of his party and the country." “There is no conceivable chance that Mr Johnson, who failed to win the support of 148 MPs in a confidence vote last month, can regain his authority to provide the effective leadership the country needs at a time of acute crisis national crisis needs,” says the Chairman. But the Daily Express has described Mr Johnson as "wounded" but "rescued", with the newspaper's front page saying the Prime Minister is fighting on with a vow to cut taxes. Meanwhile, Daily Mail columnist Stephen Glover hailed the Prime Minister as "an exceptional politician who stands and should stands above almost every other member of the Cabinet." Wednesday's Express: Boris fights on! Explaining... I am now free to cut taxes #TomorrowsPapersToday #DailyExpress #Express pic.twitter.com/XrNcpGPx98Ten Tories resigned Tuesday night including Health Minister Sajid Javid and Chancellor Rishi Sunak. Here are the others: Alex Chalk, Attorney General. The most prominent of the resignations from outside Cabinet, Mr Chalk, said he "cannot defend the untenable". Statement saying she takes "allegations of sexual misconduct very seriously" and that the Prime Minister has shown a "serious lack of judgment and care" for his parliamentary group. Jonathan Gullis, Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Foreign Secretary for Northern Ireland, in a statement Mr Gullis handed in his resignation "with a heavy heart", adding that his party had been "more focused on dealing with the damage to our reputation than it has on the people of this country." work". Ms Crosbie said in a Facebook post that if Mr Johnson is left in office he will cause "irrevocable" damage to the government and the Conservative Party "irrecoverably". Nicola Richards, Parliamentary Private Secretary for the Department for Transport Ms Richards said in a statement that she was unable to serve "under the current circumstances". Speaking to Talk TV, Mr Afolami announced he too would have to resign, adding: "I just don't think the Prime Minister has anything more, not just my support, but he doesn't, I think, have the party's support anymore or the country." Mr Bhatti quit his role with a statement that "recent events have undermined trust and standards in public life". The Prime Minister faces a busy day - first with PMQs at lunchtime and then this afternoon a meeting before the Liaison Committee, where he is due to be grilled by senior backbenchers. He is expected to be asked about the appointment of MP Chris Pincher as well as ethics in government. Former Tory Brexit Secretary Lord David Frost has urged Boris Johnson to step down as Prime Minister before he takes over the Conservative Party and t government 'down with him'. Lord Frost wrote in The Telegraph that Mr Johnson's place in history as "one of the most momentous Prime Ministers of the last century" will be sure to be remembered. If he perseveres, he risks taking the party and the government with him," said the former cabinet minister. "So it's time for him to go. If he does, he can still hand over to a new team, one determined to defend and seize the opportunities presented by Brexit, one capable of convincingly winning the next election. It's in the interests of the Conservative Party, in the interests of Leave voters, and in the national interest. It has to happen.” Lord Frost resigned from Government with immediate effect in mid-December, citing the “current direction of travel” as well as fears about “mandatory” Covid measures and a desire for the UK to have a “lightly regulated, low-tax” economy . Voices: John Peel's legacy has been tainted by sex allegations - of course his Glastonbury stage should be renamed the Russia-Ukraine War: Russia forced to abandon troops after suffering huge casualties Introducing the West's new weapon working overtime, to start war Kyiv's favor Martin Lewis warns of cost-of-living crisis as Rishi Sunak leaves junior members of government who have resigned over Boris Johnson's leadership A number of parliamentary private secretaries and even the attorney general also tendered their resignations on Tuesday night Education Secretary Will Quince resigns after being asked, Boris Defending Johnson on TV Quince says he had 'no choice' after being given 'inaccurate' information on amendment to oust Boris Johnson in no-confidence vote Complete: The resignation letters that made for painful reading of Rishi Sunak's as chancellor resigned, telling Boris Johnson that standards in government are worth fighting for. Possible runners and drivers who could replace Boris Johnson PM's allies - and those who scolded him from the backbenches - are among frontrunners to become next Tory leader Boris Johnson latest news: Will Quince resigns and says , he has 'no choice' after defending PM over Chris Pincher : Even Boris can't survive this Camilla Tominey: All but PM can see show is over Who could replace Boris Johnson? These bombastic resignation letters, complete The state we are in: Alastair Campbell meets Rory StewartRory Stewart was unlike other politicians: a Tory MP who won the respect of colleagues on both sides of the House; a preacher who spoke the truth where others chose to evade it. But the man who might have become prime minister is now claiming that politics is not only broke but also bad for our mental health. Alastair Campbell asks why it's 'game over' for Boris Johnson as newspapers react to Cabinet resignation However, Stanley Johnson is "absolutely confident" his son will continue as prime minister Today's newsletter: How two resignations left Boris Johnson on the brink - and what happens nextGrief arguments against immigrants brought to the US as childrenPro-immigrants leave on Wednesday to a federal appeals court in New Orleans in hopes of salvaging an Obama-era program that prevented deportation of thousands of people brought to the United States as children. A federal judge in Texas last year declared the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program illegal — although he agreed to leave the program intact for those already benefiting while his order is appealed. DACA advocates planned an early morning vigil ahead of disputes before the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Josh Rojas planted the Two-Strike Bunt seed in spring training after realizing that given his speed he had a better chance of putting one down than swinging away. A pep talk from his father convinced Rojas that he should give it a try. Measures include court strikes, refusal to accept new orders and no returns. Covid-19 deaths at low level despite growing wave of infections. 4 and BA.5. Authors Caleb Azumah Nelson and Minnie Driver talk about their books. Here's what you can see tonight. US guitarist Carlos Santana is doing well after collapsing on stage in Michigan and has scored three runs. Nearly a month after returning from an elbow problem, he finds his groove while the Los Angeles Dodgers lose another All-Star to injury. The win pushed the Dodgers' NL West lead to 5 1/2 games against San Diego, their biggest of the season. What the newspapers are saying as Boris struggles to survive - July 6th As fireworks lit the sky, guns put an uglier face on U.S. CultureAmerica's National Day became a twisted showcase of another form of U.S. exceptionalism: its extraordinarily easy access to guns and that resulting chaos. Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi says Labor is a "political free zone" on Brexit, adding that Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer has "flip-flopped on all the big calls". Mr Starmer is expected to attack the government's record on Brexit in a speech on Monday evening.

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Boris Johnson appoints new top team as Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid retire

UK briefing on Wednesday morning: Boris Johnson names new top team as Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid quit (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonUK morning briefing: Today's top headlines from The Telegraph Boris Johnson is fighting to save his position as Prime Minister after two of his longest-serving cabinet ministers resigned within 10 minutes. First Sajid Javid, the health minister, and then Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, posted letters on their Twitter accounts explaining why they could not stay in their posts. You can read your declarations of withdrawal in full here. Mr Johnson struggled to fill in the gaps in the front bench even as more resignations from government positions were announced. Nadhim Zahawi, Minister of Education, was appointed as the new Chancellor. He and Mr Johnson are understood to have agreed on the need for tax cuts to safeguard growth when they met in person on Tuesday night. Michelle Donelan, the universities minister, will replace Mr Zahawi as education minister, while Steve Barclay, Downing Street's chief of staff, has been appointed to replace Mr Javid as health minister. Mr Johnson goes to the Prime Minister's Questions mailing box at midday and will answer questions from the MPs' Liaison Committee at 3pm. The resignations began just two minutes after broadcasters began playing a clip filmed for the 6pm news, in which Mr Johnson finally apologized for his handling of the Chris Pincher scandal. Passed out by the resignations, Nick Gutteridge and Tony Diver recount the events that led to the Prime Minister reeling like Rocky in his last fight. Tim Stanley outlines the dramatic day of revelations, which ended with the Prime Minister watching a metaphorical lifeboat pull away from the ship, Mr Sunak and Mr Javid at the helm, others to follow. In resigning within minutes, Sajid Javid and Rishi Sunak have wielded the knife together and they no doubt hope that this will see one of them take the crown. Cabinet ministers' reluctance to lead the charge against Boris Johnson in recent months has been attributed to a belief that direct challengers will never get the top job. Lord Heseltine's humiliation after ousting Margaret Thatcher cast a long shadow over the Conservative Party. But if Mr Johnson is ultimately ousted as a result of Tuesday's events, it will be impossible to determine whether it was Mr Javid who resigned first or Mr Sunak, the older man who started the landslide. Gordon Rayner analyzes how the couple now believe they can avoid Lord Heseltine's fate. Here are the runners and drivers who could replace Mr Johnson as the next Tory leader. After a series of scandals, why is this the moment that could really spell the end for the Prime Minister? After Partygate's ferocity, just a perfect response to the resignation of Deputy Chief Whip Chris Pincher would suffice. But Camilla Tominey analyzes how instead what Tory MPs got on Tuesday was a Rocky Horror Show with Mr Johnson stuck in a time warp of self-delusion. After the resignations, rebel candidates in the 1922 committee election plan to change their rules to oust Mr Johnson. A senior source on the committee said the departures would "concentrate" the rebels. David Frost says Mr Johnson is not the leader we need to tackle the tests the country is facing. Wimbledon helped inspire Matt's latest cartoon. Here's Blower's latest cartoon on this week's events. Excess deaths are on the rise | Hundreds more people than usual are dying each week in England and Wales, with Covid not responsible for the majority of deaths, new figures show. Health experts have called for an urgent investigation into the causes of the excess mortality amid fears that the response to the pandemic, lack of access to healthcare and even the cost of living crisis could be to blame. A two-year-old boy rescued alone and bloodied from the July 4 shooting outside Chicago has been found to have lost both parents in the attack. The child, identified as Aiden, was believed to have been separated from his mother and father in the chaos, but Kevin, 37, and Irina McCarthy, 35, were listed as among the seven victims by police on Tuesday. It emerged that the shooter had legally purchased high-powered rifles, although police were called to his home twice after he threatened suicide and violence. Filming in the affluent Chicago suburb of Highland Park shows that there is no specific place in the country where "something like this" happens anymore. These three charts show that even the safest US states are never far from a mass shooting. Passers-by pay tribute to victims of Chicago's Highland Park shooting on Monday during the Independence Day parade - Charles Rex Arbogast/AP He then appeared to recall playing in front of a home crowd at Wimbledon - one that included royalty - and suddenly everything changed. After the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Court No. 1 arrived, he defeated David Goffin in a dramatic five-setter that had the Wimbledon crowd falling in love with their British No. 1 - and set up a semi-final against Novak Djokovic. Meanwhile, after their record-breaking chase, Sir Geoffrey Boycott says he doesn't like the way England are playing Test cricket at the moment - he loves it! In football, the England women's team will receive a bonus of £55,000 each if they win the European Championship this summer, it can be announced. The Bank of England raised the specter of a sharp rise in interest rates after Deputy Governor Sir Jon Cunliffe said households could bear borrowing costs of up to 5 per cent without defaulting on their debt. A combination of more fixed-rate mortgage borrowers, borrowing caps imposed by the bank in 2014, and taxpayer support during the cost-of-living crisis means families could cope with interest rates well above the 3 percent peak that markets were predicting in the coming months lying, said Sir Jon. Mussels with smoky tomato and chili sauce | This easy, flavorful main course takes less than an hour to make. Just an hour from Edinburgh, Berwickshire is a naturally beautiful region of south-east Scotland, steeped in maritime heritage yet shamefully under-visited. To receive such briefings by email twice a day, sign up for the Front Page newsletter here. Try The Briefing for 2-minute audio updates—on podcasts, smart speakers, and WhatsApp. Sign up for the free Front Page newsletter: your essential guide to The Telegraph's agenda - delivered straight to your inbox, seven days a week.

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