Blog

Heartbreak for Cameron Norrie as he loses semifinals to Novak Djokovic

It's the 32nd time Djokovic has reached a Grand Slam final, but he said the "job isn't finished yet". (Author: Gardener)

Cameron NorrieHopes of a British player in Wimbledon men's singles final are over after Cameron Norrie lost to Novak Djokovic in the semifinals. The ninth seed lost to the favorite in four sets despite being urged to victory by a cheering crowd on Center Court. Djokovic will now face Nick Kyrgios in Sunday's final after his semi-final opponent Rafael Nadal was eliminated through injury. "I didn't start well, [Norrie] was the better player for the first set," Djokovic said after his win. “I've had a lot of semi-final Grand Slams in the past, but it's never easy to get on the court. This is the 32nd time Djokovic has reached a Grand Slam final but he said the "job isn't finished yet". Speaking about his upcoming game against Kyrgios, the Serb said: "One thing is for sure, there will be emotional fireworks from both of us. "It's going to be his first Grand Slam final, obviously he's very, very excited and he doesn't have much to lose and he always plays like that. Norrie wanted to become the first British player to reach the Wimbledon final since Andy Murray won in 2016. He got off to the perfect start with a break of serve in the first game of the game and caused a huge roar from the crowd when he punched with a fist bounced but Norrie continued to break the top seed twice more to take the opener 6-2. The second set was much closer until Norrie slipped on the court and lost form with Djokovic winning 6-3. Djokovic then broke Norrie again at the start of the third set. and won it 6-2. Norrie fought back admirably in the fourth set but Djokovic faltered to win 6-4. After the final non-refundable serve at match point, Djokovic turned to a group of spectators and blew them kisses. earning a chorus of boos before celebrating reaching an eighth Wimbledon final comes after Britain's Alfie Hewett tied Wimbledon with a remarkable comeback and reached his first men's wheelchair singles final. The crowd on Court One exploded as Hewett staged his extraordinary turnaround, defeating Argentina's Gustavo Fernandez 2-6, 7-6 (7-3), 6-4. "It was incredible - I've never experienced anything like it," said the 24-year-old in an emotional on-court interview. After his quarter-final win on Thursday, Hewett said he was disappointed that court 14 was played instead of a "show" court. "I actually slept at 9:30 last night and I kept getting calls from the referee," Hewett said.

Read

Novak Djokovic ends Cameron Norrie's hopes of reaching the final against Nick Kyrgios

Defending champion Novak Djokovic ended Britain's Cameron Norrie's Wimbledon dreams to reach Sunday's final, where he is aiming to win a seventh title when he takes on Nick Kyrgios. (Author: Gardener)

Cameron Norrie'sDefending champion Novak Djokovic ended Britain's Cameron Norrie's Wimbledon dreams to reach Sunday's final, where he is aiming to win a seventh title when he takes on Nick Kyrgios. Looking to become the second Brit in the Open Era to reach the Wimbledon final alongside Andy Murray, Norrie made the perfect start by rolling over Djokovic to win the first set. But Djokovic showed why he hasn't lost a match on center court in nine years, hitting back to win 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4 and stay on course for his fourth consecutive titles at the All England Club. Six-time Wimbledon champion Djokovic has extended his streak of consecutive turf wins to 27, becoming the first man to reach 32 Grand Slam finals while losing just one of his last 19 Slam semifinals. Djokovic has won at least one Grand Slam title every year since 2010 - and usually two or three - with the exception of 2017 when he was plagued by elbow problems. However, he arrived at Wimbledon knowing it would likely be his last chance of the season as a Covid-19 vaccination card is still a requirement for entry into the United States. So, despite the Serb's experience, it was a huge match and it was certainly him who seemed the more nervous in the early stages. A tremendous roar erupted as Norrie, who had won just three games in their only last meeting last year, won the first point on serve, and the British no. The 26-year-old's career. Djokovic didn't react in the same way as he immediately retrieved the break but the top seed failed to sit, his normally watertight groundstrokes flying long or into the net. The crowd was in disbelief as Norrie won five straight games to win the opener, but the early signs in the second were that Djokovic had stabilized. The pressure mounted as Norrie secured break points in games four and six and a volley missed from above at net at 3-4 was the brief error Djokovic needed to seize the initiative. Unlike Jannik Sinner, who held Djokovic by two sets in the quarter-finals, Norrie does not possess a major weapon and with the defending champion now purring from the baseline it was difficult for the Brit to find a bright spot. Another break of serve early in the fourth set brought Djokovic a step closer and although Norrie fought manfully to stay in touch and received huge applause as he saved four break points in game five, the Serb's serve kept him out of reach . After a final non-refundable serve at match point, Djokovic turned to a group of spectators who shouted and flew away with a verbal volley, drawing a chorus of boos before celebrating reaching another final here. Australia's Kyrgios, who was given a day off by injured Spaniard Rafael Nadal in Sunday's final, now stands between 35-year-old Djokovic and a 21st Grand Slam title.

Read

Cameron Norrie leaves Wimbledon after a semi-final defeat to a standing ovation

The game will be shown to fans on Court 2 after the mound has reached full capacity as Norrie fever sweeps SW19 (Author: Gardener)

Cameron NorrieCameron Norrie's hopes of becoming the first Brit to reach the Wimbledon final in six years were dashed on Friday when he was defeated by 20-time Grand Slam champion Novak Djokovic. But a roaring crowd gave the British No. 1 a standing ovation as he left Center Court, while Djokovic was booed as he blew kisses at his fans. In his post-game press conference, Norrie said he was "proud" of his performance and paid tribute to his fans. "I think it's probably the first time in this country, here and around Wimbledon, that people have gotten to know me a little bit better and how I play, how I work on the pitch. I think it gave a lot of people something to cheer about. He said he was relaxing by "hanging out" with his best friend from New Zealand, who spent two days flying to Britain after promising to support him if he reached the semi-finals. Meanwhile, Djokovic was being questioned about the end of the game when he was seemingly booed after blowing kisses at the crowd. Earlier, thousands cheered and jumped to their feet as Norrie, 26, took over the first set while his parents, David and Helen, and his girlfriend, Louise Jacobi, looked on. But in a tense two-and-a-half hour battle in 29C, six-time Wimbledon champion Djokovic fought back to win 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4. The 15,000 crowd supported the last Briton in the tournament and chanted ' Norrie, Norrie, Norrie, oi, oi, oi,” and afterwards the fans said they were proud of his achievement. "Norrie put up a really good fight against one of the greatest players of all time. He made this country proud," said James O'Brien, watching from the stands. Eventually he faced Djokovic who was unstoppable but Norrie should be proud of his effort.” Djokovic praised Norrie, who had never progressed past the third round of a Grand Slam before, in his on-court interview. "I didn't start well and he was the better player for the first set," he said. “Cameron didn't have much to lose, he's playing the tournament of his life. He's a great player and I have a lot of respect for him.” Crowds queued for tickets on Friday morning, excited to see a Brit in the semi-finals. Norrie fever hit SW19 leading up to the game and security had to close the mound after it had reached full capacity. Wimbledon bosses then decided to show the game on Court No. 2 to please the turned away viewers. Australia's Nick Kyrgios, who had already reached the final, previously addressed Norrie when asked about the possibility of playing him there. Cameron Norrie's growth is insane. "Now he's a semi-finalist at Wimbledon and we have the chance to play each other in a Grand Slam is just crazy." Two-time Wimbledon winner Andy Murray also praised Norrie: "He's a great professional, gets the best out of his game and he and his team have worked extremely hard to get him to this position." Norrie is the first Briton , who has reached the finals since 2016 when Murray defeated Canadian Milos Raonic. Born in South Africa to a Scottish father and Welsh mother, Norrie grew up in New Zealand before attending college in the United States. His mother has previously shared how Norrie started playing tennis as a young child with a repurposed squash racquet after introducing him to the sport.

Read

Cameron Norrie determined to be back after losing first Grand Slam semifinal

The British no. 1 won the opening set but lost 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4 to defending champion Novak Djokovic. (Author: Gardener)

Cameron NorrieCameron Norrie was proud of his 'sick' run at Wimbledon but wanted more after a semifinal loss to Novak Djokovic. The British number one, who had never progressed past the third round of a Grand Slam before, had taken full advantage of a favorable draw to become only the fourth home player in the Open era to reach the last four in men's singles at SW19. But trying to beat Djokovic, who hasn't lost a match at Wimbledon since 2017, was a whole different challenge and although Norrie made an excellent start the top seed hit back forcefully to win 2-6, 6-3, 6-6. 2, 6-4 and set up a delicious final against Nick Kyrgios on Sunday. Norrie said: "I think it was obviously a good experience to play against him. Above all, the level he brings with him here at Wimbledon. I think I have to keep working hard and I still have a lot of things I can improve in my game. Getting to the semifinals, getting to Friday of week two is pretty sick. But I want to do more of that and go one step further and try to win a slam. “Many firsts for me this week, many good experiences. Compared to Novak it was just the execution level of him better than mine today in my opinion. His concentration, the way he handled his service games was better than me." Djokovic has won at least one Grand Slam title every year since 2010 - and mostly two or three - with the exception of 2017, when he was plagued by elbow problems. However, he arrived at Wimbledon knowing it would likely be his last chance of the season after being deported from Australia and losing in the quarter-finals at the French Open, and with a Covid-19 vaccination record, which is still a requirement for entry into the United States is States. So, despite the Serb's experience, it was a huge match and it was certainly him who seemed the more nervous in the early stages. Norrie celebrated a break of serve with a leaping fist in the opening game and the crowd could hardly believe it as he won five games in a row to decide the opening set. Djokovic's usually flawless groundstrokes flew long or into the net, but the top seed settled early in the second set and a break of serve from Norrie in game eight proved a turning point. The British no. 1 fought hard in the fourth set to get back in the match but Djokovic's serve kept him at a distance. Norrie felt that the result of the first set was more down to Djokovic's nerves than anything spectacular from himself, saying: "I think I played OK. I just made a lot of returns. I think it was a six out of 10 set. It was a good start, but it wasn't enough.” Norrie, seeded ninth, was most proud of being able to survive matches in which he was the favorite. "To come here, quite a lot, a lot of expectations from everyone across the country - and from me in particular," he said. "Getting through the draw the way I did, dealing with the opportunities to play Center Court, play Court One and play against guys I actually like best to beat. Especially serving up that game against (David) Goffin to make my first semifinal was pretty crazy. “I think it all happened very quickly. I will have plenty of time to think about everything. But it's difficult to think about it too much at the moment." Six-time Wimbledon champion Djokovic has extended his streak of consecutive turf wins to 27, becoming the first man to reach 32 Grand Slam finals while winning just one of his last 19 Lost Slam semifinals. Ahead of his eighth Wimbledon final, the Serb said: "Obviously I'm very happy and I'm happy to put myself in a position to win the trophy. "I didn't start as well as in most of my matches here in Wimbledon, I didn't feel so good at the beginning. A lot of mistakes. He handled them better and was a better player for a set and a half. “A poor play from his side at 4-3 in the second set, the match turned. I know I always expect myself to be able to play better than I did. But I have to be happy about this win." Djokovic backed Norrie to have more chances of reaching a Grand Slam final, saying: "Definitely. With that kind of approach, I have a feeling you'll always get chances."

Read

Cameron Norrie vows to return after losing first Grand Slam semifinal

The British no. 1 won the opening set but lost 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4 to defending champion Novak Djokovic. (Author: Gardener)

Cameron NorrieThe British number one, who had never progressed past the third round of a Grand Slam before, had taken full advantage of a favorable draw to become only the fourth home player in the Open era to reach the last four in men's singles at SW19. But trying to beat Djokovic, who hasn't lost a match at Wimbledon since 2017, was a whole different challenge and although Norrie made an excellent start the top seed hit back forcefully to win 2-6, 6-3, 6-6. 2, 6-4 and set up a delicious final against Nick Kyrgios on Sunday. Norrie said: "I think it was obviously a good experience to play against him. Above all, the level he brings with him here at Wimbledon. I think I have to keep working hard and I still have a lot of things I can improve in my game. Getting to the semifinals, getting to Friday of week two is pretty sick. But I want to do more of that and go one step further and try to win a slam. “Many firsts for me this week, many good experiences. Compared to Novak it was just the execution level of him better than mine today in my opinion. His concentration, the way he handled his service games was better than me." Djokovic has won at least one Grand Slam title every year since 2010 - and mostly two or three - with the exception of 2017, when he was plagued by elbow problems. However, he arrived at Wimbledon knowing it would likely be his last chance of the season after being deported from Australia and losing in the quarter-finals at the French Open, and with a Covid-19 vaccination record, which is still a requirement for entry into the United States is States. So, despite the Serb's experience, it was a huge match and it was certainly him who seemed the more nervous in the early stages. Norrie celebrated a break of serve with a leaping fist in the opening game and the crowd could hardly believe it as he won five games in a row to decide the opening set. Djokovic's usually flawless groundstrokes flew long or into the net, but the top seed settled early in the second set and a break of serve from Norrie in game eight proved a turning point. The British no. 1 fought hard in the fourth set to get back in the match but Djokovic's serve kept him at a distance. Norrie felt that the result of the first set was more down to Djokovic's nerves than anything spectacular from himself, saying: "I think I played OK. I just made a lot of returns. I think it was a six out of 10 set. It was a good start, but it wasn't enough.” Norrie, seeded ninth, was most proud of being able to survive matches in which he was the favorite. "To come here, quite a lot, a lot of expectations from everyone across the country - and from me in particular," he said. "Getting through the draw the way I did, dealing with the opportunities to play Center Court, play Court One and play against guys I actually like best to beat. Especially serving up that game against (David) Goffin to make my first semifinal was pretty crazy. “I think it all happened very quickly. I will have plenty of time to think about everything. But it's difficult to think about it too much right now.” Cameron Norrie was proud of his “sick” run at Wimbledon but wanted more after a semi-final loss to Novak Djokovic. Cameron Norrie was proud of his 'sick' run at Wimbledon but wanted more after a semifinal loss to Novak Djokovic. Six-time Wimbledon champion Djokovic has extended his streak of consecutive turf wins to 27, becoming the first man to reach 32 Grand Slam finals while losing just one of his last 19 Slam semifinals. Ahead of his eighth Wimbledon final, the Serb said: "Obviously I'm very happy and I'm happy to put myself in a position to win the trophy. "I didn't start as well as in most of my matches here in Wimbledon, I didn't feel so good at the beginning. A lot of mistakes. He handled them better and was a better player for a set and a half. “A poor play from his side at 4-3 in the second set, the match turned. I know I always expect myself to be able to play better than I did. Djokovic backed Norrie to have more chances of reaching a Grand Slam final, saying: "Definitely. With that kind of approach, I feel like you'll always get chances.” The article Cameron Norrie vows return after losing first Grand Slam semifinal appeared first on Tennis365.com.

Read

5 topics of conversation as Jesus shines and Arsenal make their comeback in Nuremberg

NUREMBERG 3-5 ARSENAL: Gabriel Jesus came off the bench at half-time to help the Gunners turn the game around and claim a pre-season win in Germany (Author: Gardener)

NurembergNUREMBERG 3-5 ARSENAL: Gabriel Jesus came off the bench at half-time to help the Gunners turn the game on its head and earn a preseason win in Germany from behind to defeat Nuremberg in their first preseason Defeat game in front of fans 5-3. In his first appearance for the Gunners following his £45million transfer from Manchester City, the Brazilian scored two minutes into his half-time lead. His powerful strike brought the visitors back after a poor first half which saw them fall behind through goals from Johannes Geis and Kwadwo Duah. Substitute Mohamed Elneny equalized before Eddie Nketiah and Jesus jointly forced Nuremberg's own goals. Lukas Schleimer briefly pulled one back for the hosts before Jesus got his second after good work from Charlie Patino and Gabriel Martinelli. Despite Hector Bellerin pushing to leave Arsenal, Mikel Arteta has included his fellow Spanish player in the starting XI for the trip to Germany. The 27-year-old was one of many players in the red and white guilty of sloppiness during the pre-season friendly and his smooth performance is unlikely to convince Arteta and Edu he deserves a spot in the squad for deserved in the fast approaching season. even if he was presented with the captain's armband against Nuremberg. Matt Turner should have done better after Johannes Geis struck the Bundesliga hosts midway through the first half after Kieran Tierney lost the ball on the field. The left-back was admittedly unhelped after preseason debutant Matt Turner lifted the ball into upper field. After Nuremberg snatched the ball back in midfield, Lino Tempelmann charged into the Arsenal third and fended off Emile Smith Rowe's challenge, into the space Tierney left. The German midfielder then pulled the ball back to Johannes Geis, who fired a shot off the bar. Turner didn't shower himself in glory here either, as the shot appeared to be fairly central, but he didn't come close. Where will Arsenal finish next season? It took the hosts just five minutes to double their lead through Kwadwo Duah, who lashed the ball over Matt Turner after even more carelessness from the visitors. This time, Albert Sambi Lokonga was the man to give up possession to give Nürnberg the kind of scoring opportunity Arsenal have never been able to unleash. Adding to the Gunners' woes was a familiar sight as Tierney departed just after the half-hour and Mikel Arteta sent Cedric Soares in his place. However, there was no sign that Tierney was injured so a 30th-minute substitution could have been in the cards all along, given that he was able to warm down at half-time. Gabriel Jesus scored twice on his pre-season debut for Arsenal While Mohamed Elneny was on the top scorer and Gabriel Martinelli impressed, the second half was all about Gabriel Jesus for Arsenal. Probably with Mikel Arteta's words in his ears, the visitors came out with a different team in the second half and it was just seconds for Jesus to combine with Eddie Nketiah - who had been isolated for the first 45 minutes - before he slammed in the near post. The storm duo continued to stay together well throughout the time on the pitch, forcing the two own goals from Christopher Schindler and Tim Handwerker that gave the visitors a 4-2 lead. Jesus then ensured Arsenal retained a two-goal cushion with another fine shot from the post just after Lukas Schleimer had halved the deficit. Mikel Arteta has a lot to think about after pre-season win While it was an entertaining win which gave Arsenal plenty of hope for the coming season, the performance against Nuremberg also raised many questions. Nicolas Pepe had a quiet game, Kieran Tierney's fitness remains an issue and the likes of Hector Bellerin and Pablo Mari have been phased out, although they appear destined to leave the Gunners. With a clash against Everton on July 17, Mikel Arteta will be hoping to have a refined squad at his disposal as he continues to shrink and expand his side's ranks. In the meantime, he and his players have over a week to further prepare for the new season before their next game.

Read

Novak Djokovic destroys Cameron Norrie's final Wimbledon dream

The British No. 1 dared to believe after winning the opener but six-time champion Djokovic roared back to win 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4 (Author: Gardener)

DjokovicCameron Norrie has had two long days to think about exactly what he could do to get under Novak Djokovic's skin in the biggest match of his life, the Wimbledon semifinals on Center Court. For many challengers over the years, that would have been just enough time to reconsider, grasp the importance of the occasion, and immediately burst into flames. Starting off with high intensity and energy, he pushed his way onto the six-time champion and begged him to keep up as he took an early lead. After a disorderly start and a set deficit, Djokovic gradually kept Norrie in check before easily outplaying him 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4. With his win, Djokovic restarted his story after his first two Grand Slams were marred by his deportation from Australia and the misfortune of pulling Rafael Nadal in the French Open quarterfinals. He has now reached an eighth career Wimbledon final, which puts him second on the men's all-time list, behind only Roger Federer at 12th. As he now contests his 32nd Grand Slam final, a new all-time record for men, Djokovic is just one win away from becoming the second player, also after Federer, to set what seemed like an unattainable man two decades ago -0 record seemed: Pete Sampra's seven Wimbledon titles. Ahead of Djokovic, the top seed and his fourth straight Wimbledon title, is unseeded Australian Nick Kyrgios, who reached his maiden Grand Slam final on Thursday after Nadal, the second seedling, failed before Friday's scheduled match due to a abdominal injury had to resign. Having spent much of the last 18 months climbing the ladder and establishing himself at the top of the game while still under the radar, Norrie often making his big strides at non-public events, this was his moment On the biggest stage of Wimbledon, against one of the sport's superstars, he had given himself the opportunity to show his skills. On a sweltering day in London, Djokovic initially looked far more nervous, spraying errors while struggling with Norrie's flat, low-bouncy backhand. Norrie constantly tested his patience, engaging him in long rallies and triggering errors when he broke serve three times in the set. Serving the first set, Norrie hit two aces, including his hardest serve of the tournament at 127 mph. For all of Norrie's positive energy, Djokovic was terrible in the opening set. After that, he acknowledged the pressure he felt even after being in this position so many times. His improvements in the second set started on his serve as he served well on his first few service plays and then found a greater rhythm on his groundstrokes. He started to pressure Norrie in his own service games and at 4-3 against Djokovic, Norrie sprayed a long forehand on the break point after a poor service game. As the momentum shifted, Djokovic kept marching, reeling off five straight games to lead through an early break in the third set and he looked it over with ease. As Djokovic's relentless pressure continued into the fourth set, Norrie didn't give up. But as he took more risks than usual and played well outside of his own comfort zone, Norrie's mistakes multiplied and the huge rift between the 20-time Grand Slam champion and the debut semi-finalist continued to grow until the end. As Djokovic sealed his victory, he sent a kiss to a disruptive fan in the audience, prompting scattered boos from the crowd. The jubilation returned as he showered his fallen opponent with praise: "Cameron didn't have much to lose, he played the tournament of his life," said Djokovic. The end of Norrie's breakout tournament looks set to be another defining moment in his career. He had arrived at Wimbledon looking for his first place in the fourth round at a Grand Slam tournament, a result that had eluded him for a while. When presented with the opportunity to go much further, he handled all the pressure very well as Britain's top player at Wimbledon, demonstrating both his mental toughness and the sweeping improvements in his game that have enabled him to to flourish. Norrie has established himself on the sport's biggest stages and shown what he's capable of. The next challenge in his career is to make sure this isn't quite the tournament of his life and to create a game that allows him to keep coming back to those stages.

Read

Norrie loses as Djokovic reaches Wimbledon final

Britain's Cameron Norrie is unable to capitalize on a confident start while Novak Djokovic fights back to reach the Wimbledon men's singles final. (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonBritain's Cameron Norrie failed to capitalize on a confident start as Novak Djokovic hit back to reach the Wimbledon men's final. But after winning the first set, he lost to the top seed 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4. Serb Djokovic, who is targeting a fourth consecutive title and seventh overall, meets Australian Nick Kyrgios in Sunday's final. The 35-year-old will also be vying for a 21st men's Grand Slam title, which would put him adrift of Rafael Nadal's record. Spaniard Nadal, 36, was due to face Kyrgios in Friday's second semi-final but pulled out of Thursday's game with a stomach injury. Norrie, seeded ninth, became the first British player to reach a semi-final in Wimbledon singles since Johanna Konta in 2017, and received partisan support on Center Court. The atmosphere turned celebratory as Norrie broke three times to win the opening set before becoming increasingly stifled as Djokovic eventually found his level. Norrie received a thunderous round of applause as he left center court, including from Djokovic, who stepped down and applauded his departure. "Cameron didn't have much to lose, he played the tournament of his life," said Djokovic. "Cameron dominated the game and I was lucky to break his serve in the second set. He gifted me a game and from there the momentum changed I think." Finally, despite the apparent disappointment of not being able to maintain his quick start against Djokovic, Norrie will look back on these two weeks with great pride fought to strength to reach the last four. The confidence he's had over the past couple of seasons through rapid rises in the rankings and winning ATP Tour titles of increasing prestige was evident in the Briton in a wonderful opener. After scoring two break points in the first game of the game After scoring, Norrie clinched the first dragging Djokovic across the court and hit a winner past the Serb as he charged forward. Norrie soon led again after a nervous service game that meant he was unable to consolidate the break, and that was aided by Djokovic's own edginess. Two more uncharacteristic errors from Djokovic, who hit two forehands long from the baseline, allowed Norrie to break again and take a 3-2 lead. This time Norrie held to solidify the break, further errors from Djokovic's racquet culminating in a forehand into the net. Another break to make it 5-2 saw Norrie serve for the set and after two double faults, including one at set point, he hammered in an ace to seal the opener. Returning to the sun-drenched court with a cap early in the second set, Djokovic served better and dropped just a point in his first four service games. More pressure built on Norrie's serve, leading to more errors from the Brit, particularly on his forehand. Djokovic eventually earned his fourth break point of the set for a 5-3 lead when Norrie hit a long forehand but the damage was done by missing a volley he was expected to put away for 15-30. Norrie started the third set with a point win that sent Djokovic smacking the strings, but the game quickly switched in the Serb's favour. Djokovic scored a third break point for the first time to progress in the match and after winning seven of the next nine games it looked unlikely Norrie would be able to fight back to win. He served up the win to propel himself into an eighth Wimbledon men's final, a tally surpassed only by Roger Federer's 12 appearances there. It's also his 32nd Grand Slam final overall, putting him ahead of Federer as a men's record. "Of course I've had a lot of Grand Slam semifinals, but it's never easy to go on the pitch," said Djokovic. “You have a lot of pressure and expectations, from yourself and others. Cameron dominated the game and I felt like I was lucky to break his serve in the second set. “He kind of gifted me a game and since then the momentum has shifted a bit. That's the meaning of the semifinals of a Grand Slam."

Read

Novak Djokovic beats Cameron Norrie - Live Reaction!

The Brit won the first set in the men's semifinals before Novak Djokovic roared back to win in four sets (Author: Gardener)

DjokovicThe Brit won the first set in the men's semifinals before Novak Djokovic roared back to win in four sets. Shot of the Day: Alfie Hewett whips this backhand winner. Too many to list, but I like this one: Djokovic has won at least one Grand Slam title every year since 2010, with the exception of 2017 (when he had elbow problems). Djokovic beats Norrie three sets to one to reach Wimbledon final Djokovic wins 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4! Djokovic holds serve to secure his place in the final! A loose forehand from Norrie gives Djokovic the opening point. But he makes up for it with a kicking forehand that his opponent can't tame. Djokovic hits an ace down the middle as if to show his contempt, but then fades wide with a forehand. But Djokovic's heavy serve gets him to match point and he seals it with another crunchy first serve that a desperate Norrie can't return. A brave effort from the Brit but Djokovic just had too many weapons and when he got going there was only one winner. Novak Djokovic celebrates his win over Cameron Norrie/Photo: Tom Jenkins/The Guardian Djokovic (right) is congratulated by Cameron Norrie. We have a Brit in a Wimbledon final thanks to a dramatic win by Alfie Hewett in the men's wheelchair semifinals. ALSO SEE: Alfie Hewett shines on the big stage to beat Gustavo Fernández and reach the final When the BBC's Rishi Persad asked Novak Djokovic if he could meet Nick Kyrgios in Sunday's final, the crowd let out some mime noises. Related: Nick Kyrgios enjoys reaching a place he never expected | Simon Cambers Related: Nick Kyrgios says Australian tennis greats are 'sickly obsessed' with tearing him down. First, it's Tumaini Carayol in tomorrow's big game on Center Court. He's had a fortnight to remember and it's worth noting that Andy Murray didn't just do it with a Bob Beamon-style jump here. Murray made his first Wimbledon semifinals in 2009, reached his first final in 2012 and then won it in 2013. I'm sure Norrie would sign up for a similar career. Djokovic on beating Kyrgios in the final. Never won a set against him.” It's true; The Aussie holds a 2-0 winning record despite both games taking place in 2017 and on outdoor hard courts. He was the better player for the first set. I wish him all the best, he's a great player, I have a lot of respect for him.” *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 3-5 Djokovic (* denotes server) A few mistakes by Djokovic give Norrie Some breathing room at 30-0 before a tricky drop shot takes the Serb back to 30-15. Djokovic then gifted Norrie the next two points as if his only focus now was serving instead of trying to win this match with a break. Norrie returns to his seat to attempt to summon something, anything. Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 3-5 Djokovic (* denotes server) Djokovic wins the opening point but then aims for the line with a two-handed backhand. Nothing an ace can't solve on the next point (that's 11 aces now) before letting Norrie run side-to-side and win with a forehand winner 40-15. How about another ace to end the game? Looks like Djokovic is catching up. He's a game away. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 3-4 Djokovic (* stands for Server) Norrie opens with an ace before going long with a forehand to go 15-15. But he flat-foots his opponent with a winner down the middle, then sprints for a Djokovic drop shot to make it 40-15. A huge roar as an unforced Djokovic error gives Norrie the game. Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 2-4 Djokovic* (* denotes server) Hello, Dave Tindall here to get you to the finish. An easy save for Djokovic ends with an ace. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 2-3 Djokovic (* denotes server) A sizzling return at Norrie's feet puts the Brit under pressure at 15-30. He needs Djokovic to dress up with a backhand drop shot that he lands short to get back to 30-30. He could really use a big first serve. Djokovic comes into play, forcing Norrie to miss after chasing a drop shot. Norrie saves it with a brave forehand in the corner. Djokovic sends Norrie around the field like a cocker spaniel in the next point to reach another break point. Norrie saves it (to cheers from the crowd) and a few moments later saves it a second. He then saves a third and fourth before finally holding. Djokovic wins the second set 6-3 and equals the match 1-1. Norrie 6:2, 3:6 Djokovic* (* denotes server) It's not the best start from Djokovic who makes a double fault. He then flies a pathetic backhand drop shot into the net when he had good court position. 0-30 with Djokovic playing just as poorly as in the first set. However, normal service resumes with Djokovic booming down two first serves to reach the set point. He takes it thanks to an unforced error from Norrie. Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 1-3 Djokovic* (* denotes server) Norrie shows good touch on a backhand drop shot to set up a forehand winner and go 15-15 into the game come. Two aces and 40 seconds later he's gone. Another serve in the middle is non-returnable and Djokovic is two games and a break in the fourth set. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 1-2 Djokovic (* denotes server) This is better from Norrie. He booms some furious serves that Djokovic can't handle and watches as the Serb nets a forehand to hold to love. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 0-1 Djokovic (* denotes server) Norrie misses to the left to put Djokovic back in play at 30-30. Norrie finds a sizzling backhand that Djokovic can only grind high and long. Game point, but Norrie can't take it. Djokovic crashes a return on his forehand, which Norrie pushes into the net. A bad backhand gives Djokovic the break point. And a long forehand gives his rival the game. Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6, 0-2 Djokovic*(* denotes server) The crowd on Center Court is trying to rally Norrie but he doesn't seem very responsive to the noise around him , which is a good thing when you're trying to stay at a consistent level, but bad when you need a spark to ignite an improved game. Djokovic is holding on to love after a wonderful net game. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-5 Djokovic (* denotes server) Norrie holds at 30. His first serve percentage is only slightly behind Djokovic at 61%, but it feels like he needs to be a lot lower. He's brave to hit a second serve and get the game point he takes. Ball kids watch as Novak Djokovic returns from the baseline. Djokovic takes a bathroom break where you can imagine him staring in the mirror and saying to himself, "Get that done, quick!" I'm sure he'll want to conserve energy for Sunday's final as Kyrgios has two more days of rest will have had. Djokovic wins third set 6-2 and leads the match 2-1 Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 2-6 Djokovic* (* denotes server) Djokovic serves to win third set. He seems in a hurry as he puts too much juice on an early backhand when he's mid-court. Then Norrie senses an opportunity and rushes in with a second serve only to net a backhand. Norrie drives down a Djokovic dropshot, but as he throws it over the net, the Serb waits with a grin and shoves it past him. An unforced error from Norrie at 40-30 gives Djokovic the game and third set. *Norrie 6-2, 3-5 Djokovic (* denotes server) Norrie gets it right at 15-15 before missing a backhand volley at the net that he would pocket 99 times out of 100. Djokovic sees a drop shot from Norrie coming a mile away in the next point and puts it away to bring two break points. This time Norrie crumbles, hitting long with the forehand and Djokovic, who now looks more like himself, will serve for the second set. Norrie 6-2, 2-3 Djokovic* (* denotes server) Norrie moves Djokovic around after receiving a fine return of serve and wins the first point with an overhead smash. However, Djokovic shows better courtcraft in the next few points and looks a little happier as he finds the corners of the court with his open forehand. A few big serves don't give Norrie a chance and it's a hold to 15 for Djokovic, giving Norrie very little to work with now that he's taken his game to a higher level. Novak Djokovic serves to Cameron Norrie. Photo: Tom Jenkins/The Guardian Photo: Tom Jenkins/The Guardian Photo: Tom Jenkins/The Guardian Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 1-5 Djokovic* (* denotes server) “Very pessimistic about Norrie. Norrie certainly needs to raise his level because Djokovic has cruise control here. Norrie was clearly better than a sad Djokovic in the first set, but even the average to good version of Djokovic we see here is streets ahead of Norrie. He lasts to 15 and now Norrie has to serve to stay in the third set. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 1-4 Djokovic (* denotes server) Again, Norrie breaks a sweat on his serve - and this time he's busted. Djokovic attacks the Briton's forehand and comes into the net more often than before. Norrie needs a booming first serve to get back to 30-30 but Djokovic now has his man's measure and bends his will two points and wins the game when Norrie fires a backhand wide after a vicious return of serve. Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 1-3 Djokovic* (* denotes server) "Let's go Norrie, let's go," chanted the crowd on Center Court. Can Norrie use that energy to apply pressure for the first time in a while on Djokovic's serve? A Djokovic ace silences them. However, Norrie stays in the next point and Djokovic nets a backhand. Djokovic doesn't look back. A sizzling volley and two aces later gives him a two-game lead in the third set. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 1-2 Djokovic (* denotes server) Norrie just needs to win a point here and then work from there. He doesn't win the first, but then a camouflaged forehand sends Djokovic into false fire and the Center Court crowd roars their approval. Fueled by that energy, Norrie lands a delicious backhand volley and uses a couple of powerful first serves to hold the 15th stand. Norrie 6: 2, 3: 6, 0: 2 Djokovic* (* stands for server) That looks ominous for Norrie now. Everything he hits seems to go to the net or web. He barely hints at worrying Djokovic, who is comfortably clinging to love, as Norrie smashes a simple mid-court overhead wide. *Norrie 6-2, 3-6, 0-1 Djokovic (* denotes server) Norrie just has to hold here to slow Djokovic's momentum. The British No.1 wins a wonderful first point by steering a forehand over the line after an attempted drop shot by Djokovic. Norrie can't chase after a fine volley from the Serb. However, he puts himself under pressure again with a stray forehand. A furious punch puts him back up to 30-30, but then he shoots long and faces another break point. He saves it with a nice net game. But Djokovic takes a second break point as Norrie slices a wild forehand high and long. Chris Page writes, “Wheelchair tennis no longer needs to be hidden away on an outdoor court. That was a great comeback from Hewett who said of the Court One vibe: I've never experienced anything like this before so thank you. Hewett fights back from a break in the deciding set, defeating Argentina's Gustavo Fernández 2-6 7-6 6-4. It's his first Wimbledon final. And he's totally buzzing. He is aiming for his sixth Grand Slam title and is only 24. Alfie Hewett celebrates after winning match point in his semi-final against Gustavo Fernandez. Norrie 6-2, 3-4 Djokovic* (* stands for server) It's a hold-to-love for Djokovic, who expends all his energy trying to crack Norrie's serve again. *Norrie 6-2, 3-3 Djokovic (* denotes server) A bad shot at the net by Norrie gives Djokovic another break. However, a nice backhand on the line makes Djokovic throw the ball into the net. A wild forehand from Norrie, which misses by half a meter, gives Djokovic another break point. A fine wide serve from Norrie helps him get started. Norrie has to fend off another break point after a bad forehand, but does so aggressively. He wins the game after winning a backhand cut backhand. He's good at that. *Norrie 6-2, 2-2 Djokovic (* stands for server) Two big first serves, including an ace, put Norrie at 30-0. A blitz of his forehand puts Djokovic up to 15-30 and then Norrie hits a forehand wide in midfield when he should have won the point. Now the pressure is on Norrie as he blows a weak forehand into the net. A brave and brilliant point from Norrie following in a vicious forehand and volleys home to bring Deuce saves him. Djokovic tries to fire back a second serve when Norrie has the advantage but finds the net. Norrie holds. Norrie wins first set vs. Djokovic 6-2 *Norrie 6-2 Djokovic (* denotes server) Djokovic looks like he just wants that first set over so he can start again. It's a hold at 15 for Norrie, with Djokovic helping out with a couple of unforced errors. Norrie doesn't even serve very well. On the first serves it is 42%. He downshifts a 127mph thumper to go 40-15 up, mind you, and then an ace gets him the first set. Wow. Cameron Norrie celebrates winning the first set. Norrie 6-2, 1-2 Djokovic* (*denotes server) Norrie tries to miss Djokovic with some deep, flat backhands, but the Serb is much more accurate this time and seems more confident handling it. He doesn't miss and it's Norrie making unforced errors. And when the score was 40-0, he served volleys to hold the love for a second straight game of service. *Norrie 6-2, 1-1 Djokovic (* denotes server) A poor miss by Norrie at the net after a good wide serve gives Djokovic a taster at 30-30. Norrie forces Djokovic into a corner and is again faced with the same type of backhand volley. He steams it across the court to win the point. In the very next point, Norrie benefits from a power cord. It's a stop. Norrie 6-2, 0-1 Djokovic* (* denotes server) This is the Djokovic we know. A stop to fall in love with some brilliantly varied serves. Hewett bounced back against Fernandez in the men's wheelchair semifinals. 4:4 in the deciding set and on serve. Norrie 5-2 Djokovic* (* denotes server) Djokovic's timing seems wrong. When the score was 15:0, he shot another forehand into the net. He did that a lot in that first sentence. On the next point, he hits an ugly forehand wide away like he's an excited teenager and not a 20-time Slam winner. Norrie spawns two more break points, running down a weak drop shot and conveniently tucking it away. He won't break it again, will he? He easily outlasts Djokovic in a rally and gets the big man to find the net again. This is an incredible start from the Brit, but above all a terrible one from Djokovic. *Norrie 4-2 Djokovic (* denotes server) Can Norrie consolidate? Djokovic sends Norrie for a runaround before finally throwing away a padded volley at the net. Norrie lunges at a failed forehand to blast away a midfield forehand. A booming first serve hits the line and Djokovic can't control it. Norrie is looking good now and has no trouble finishing the game on 15. *Norrie 2-2 Djokovic (* denotes server) What a point to start this game. A tweener lob from Djokovic sets up a volley at the net after a brilliantly entertaining rally. 0-15 and Djokovic raises his arms for the rich appreciation of the Center Court crowd. A cross-court backhand is brilliantly placed by Norrie to force Djokovic to net a mistimed forehand. Then the Brit gives too much gas on a forehand and goes long. He fights back to 30-30, hits a quick first serve that's too hot for Djokovic to go to the game point at 40-30, then fires another to hold. Novak Djokovic fires a tweener. Norrie 3-2 Djokovic* (* denotes server) Can Norrie put some pressure on Djokovic's serve again? At 15-15, he's definitely trying, shooting long with a double backhand as he tries to pass Djokovic. While Djokovic struggles on his first serve, Norrie takes things to the floor with his flat backhand. It works beautifully when Djokovic bends down and finds the net. And then Djokovic hits a stubborn backhand far. breaking point. breaking point. breaking point. And what a point. Struggling to stay in the point, Norrie goes deep again with his backhand and watches as Djokovic shoots long. He broke Djokovic again! Hewett was broken in the deciding set of the men's wheelchair semifinals, trailing Fernandez 3-1. Norrie 1-2 Djokovic* (* denotes server) This is more like Djokovic, who is slowly loosening up. A pair of aces - one wide and one in the middle - means he can hold to 15 with little fuss. *Norrie 1-1 Djokovic (* denotes server) So how far will the British underdog go with his own serve? Djokovic puts pressure on at 15:15 and forces Norrie to miss the left shot with a stiff forehand. A loose backhand gives Djokovic two break points. Looking nervous, Norrie misses his first serve and then slams a forehand into the net. Djokovic breaks back! Norrie 1-0 Djokovic* (* denotes server) Norrie breaks immediately! Djokovic starts tentatively. His first serve nets, then he struggles with his ball throw and finally shoots over a lame second serve. Norrie takes control and outlives Djokovic in the rally. Norrie lunges for another second serve, forcing Djokovic to blow on a long forehand. 0-30 and a huge cheer from Center Court. Djokovic fights back to 15-30 but then gives Norrie two break points. The Brit can't take the first, but a delicate backhand volley at the net means he doesn't miss the second. On the center court, Krejcikova and Siniakova fought their way into the women's doubles final with a score of 6:2, 6:2. Next up are Djokovic and Norrie, who will be out shortly. And Alfie Hewett produces a stormy tie-break, winning it 7-3 to set up a deciding set against Gustavo Fernandez in their wheelchair semi-final. goodbye Katerina Siniakova and Barbora Krejcikova (right) celebrate after winning their women's doubles semifinal against Jelena Ostapenko and Lyudmyla Kichenok. Right, we're ready to go to center court. Djokovic serves first. In the men's wheelchair semifinals on Court 1, the score is 1:1 and serve in the decisive set between Alfie Hewett from Britain and Gustavo Fernandez from Argentina. Djokovic finally joins Norrie. Center Court erupts as the two semifinalists emerge. It's muggy in London today so expect a feast of sweat on Center Court this afternoon. Cameron Norrie and Novak Djokovic are two of the fittest players on the tour so they will more than handle the heat and intensity of their semi-finals. Djokovic made Norrie wait outside the dressing room. Early mind games? It's his first Grand Slam semifinal. And what a semi-final! Wimbledon, with a raucous home crowd, against one of the greatest players tennis has ever seen. Hewett breaks Fernandez again and leads 6-5, but after leveling the match with a set he's broken to 15. The Argentine sends us into a tiebreak with a brilliant forehand return from Hewett's second serve. Some belated excitement from Alfie Hewett: he breaks back Fernandez at 2-5 and then has three break points in the Argentine's subsequent service game. Fernandez saves two of them - the second with a devastating cross-court forehand winner - but Hewett outplays him in a long rally to claim the break. We're back on serve now at 4-5 in set two! In the women's doubles semifinals, second-seeded Barbora Krejcikova and Katerina Siniakova won the first set on center court 6-2 against fourth-seeded Lyudmyla Kichenok and Jelena Ostapenko. Alfie Hewett, meanwhile, stares down the run in his wheelchair semi-final against Gustavo Fernandez. He just got broken again and is 1-5 and a set down in the second set. While we wait for the big game, here's some pre-game information. Simon Cambers on why giving 'lucky losers' a semifinal spot is a bad idea: Related: Why putting a lucky loser in a Wimbledon semifinal would be bad for tennis | Simon Camber's Tumaini Carayol on Cameron Norrie's journey from South Africa to SW19: Related: From South Africa to SW19: Norrie's journey to the Wimbledon semi-final And Tumaini once again on what Norrie needs to do to stand a chance of outsmarting Djokovic: Related: The Cameron Norrie must do his best to challenge Djokovic Britain's Alfie Hewett has pretty much in his wheelchair singles semi-final against Argentina's Gustavo Fernandez, who won the first set 6-2 and is 3-0 ahead in the second set much trouble #1. And what a glorious day for the men's semifinals. But unfortunately we only have one to enjoy today as Rafa Nadal's injury deprived us of a tantalizing showdown with Nick Kyrgios advancing to his first Grand Slam final amidst all the clouds surrounding him off the pitch. All of which brings us back to the intriguing duel between Britain's Cameron Norrie, who also had his all-time best Grand Slam run, and Novak Djokovic, whose best Grand Slam runs brought him an insignificant 20 titles. Both players went through grueling five-setter games in their quarterfinals and Djokovic's record of winning in such games obviously makes him the clear favorite, but Jannik Sinner showed cracks on Tuesday and Norrie showed his own reserves of competitive courage. He will also have the support of the crowd as Center Court has increasingly moved to Norrie over the course of the fortnight, although for all his controversy in recent years Djokovic has largely received a warm welcome at SW19 this year.

Read

How Norrie's girlfriend supported him from the SW19 stands

Cameron Norrie may have experienced heartbreak at Wimbledon today - but his glamorous girlfriend, New Yorker Louise Jacobi, will be the first at his side to comfort him tonight. (Author: Gardener)

NorrieCameron Norrie may have experienced heartbreak at Wimbledon today - but his glamorous girlfriend will be the first to comfort him tonight. New York's Louise Jacobi, who cheered for him from the stands throughout the competition in SW19, supported the British No. 1 throughout the tournament. Despite Cameron getting off to a stellar start in today's semifinals, Novak Djokovic bounced back forcefully, winning 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4 and setting up a final against Nick Kyrgios on Sunday. Louise is a glamorous textile designer who worked for Calvin Klein before joining Please Don't Touch in New York as a textile consultant. She has been at Johannesburg-born Cameron's side for at least two years and has been described as a "quiet, positive impact" by his British parents. Cameron gave up his partying, hedonistic lifestyle to pursue a more professional career after suffering injuries in a moped accident about six years ago, The Times reported. The lithe 20-year-old now regularly shares pictures with the tennis star on her social media platform, posting snaps from their romantic getaways - including New Zealand, Monaco and Italy. She is a graduate of the prestigious Central St Martins in London, which made it possible for the couple to meet in the capital. Louise was in the stands last October when Cameron became the first Brit to win the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California. The couple, who shared a kiss on the pitch, had plenty to celebrate: alongside his new ranking and historic tournament win, Cameron took home a cash prize of £880,000. It's unknown how the couple met, but they've been appearing on each other's Instagram accounts since 2019. According to the Please Don't Touch website, Louise is its founder and creative director. His family say that having Louise by his side throughout the championships was also a positive influence on him. She admitted she was so new to tennis when she met Cameron that she barely knew the rules. His parents warmed to the New Yorker and joined them in his player box. However, Cameron recently told the Times that tensions sometimes arise in his Putney household because he and Louise disagree over cooking. "We fight when we cook," Cameron said. Born in Johannesburg to British parents, he started playing tennis at the age of four with a stripped-down squash racquet on an "imaginary court" next to his house. His mother Helen, 59, a biochemist from Cardiff, says: "He wanted to play all the time." When he was a child, the family left South Africa and moved to Auckland, where his mother and Glasgow-born father David - also a biochemist - still alive. They noticed that their left-handed son had talent and he entered a coaching program and reached the top 10 in junior rankings worldwide. After three years, he received a scholarship to Texas Christian College in Fort Worth, Texas, where he studied sociology alongside his tennis. He was dropped from the team to compete in a second tier ATP Challenger tournament and was also threatened with expulsion. He described the moment as a "watershed moment" this week, saying: "The coaches got me going and I was more professional after that. He became the US No. 1 collegiate player before turning pro in 2017. He made his debut for the British Davis Cup team the next year and reached his first ATP final in January 2019. Despite being established in the top 100 singles rankings, Cameron still flew under the radar. While he became the face of British tennis overnight, the new No.1, who has been described as "a great example" by his idol and former British No.1 Sir Andy Murray, has had a decidedly international upbringing and has spent time in South Africa, New Zealand and the USA. Despite his transcontinental accent, which Cameron himself admits can be hard to pin down, the player insists he feels quintessentially British. "I consider myself British," he previously said. “My parents are both British. On the tennis circuit, he has befriended British tennis figurehead Sir Andy, who took time to train with Cameron when he made his senior debut at Wimbledon in 2017. "He's such a great role model and at such a high level that it kind of rubs off on you," Cameron said at the time. When Cameron became Britain's No 1 last year, Sir Andy was the one to wield the praise, saying after his win: 'I'd be lying if I said I called it that, to be honest. "However, I've spent a decent amount of time with him and practiced with him quite a bit and he works extremely hard. "I think he's a great example for not just British players but for all tennis players you can watch and go. If you put in the effort every day and really devote yourself to the sport, having an attitude like him takes you a long, long way.'

Read