Blog

The public expects us to govern properly, Rishi Sunak tells PM

Rishi Sunak resigned as chancellor because he believed Boris Johnson's behavior was unjustifiable and failed to be honest with the public (Author: Gardener)

Rishi SunakRishi Sunak resigned as chancellor because he believed Boris Johnson's behavior was unjustifiable and failed to be honest with the public. The chancellor's two years at the treasury were marred by repeated arguments with the prime minister over taxes and spending. However, Sunak allies said No. 10's misleading statements about his knowledge of allegations of improper conduct involving Chris Pincher were the final straw. "It became clear that he had fundamentally different opinions about what it takes to run the country," said an ally. Sunak's relationship with Johnson began to sour in September, when the Prime Minister urged him to support an increase in Social Security to pay for welfare. The Chancellor opposed the 2.5 per cent tax increase for employers and employees at a time when Britain was trying to recover from the pandemic. Sunak told him that the only way he could do this was by raising taxes. He did it because he is serving the Prime Minister's will," a friend of Sunak's said. Although he has always owed his allegiance to the prime minister at some point, it becomes impossible to defend him." Another friend of Sunak's said: "For anyone who pays attention to the ins and outs of politics, it's pretty obvious that things have been difficult. He joined the House of Commons as MP for Richmond, North Yorkshire, in 2015 and was given his first post as junior secretary in January 2018. When Johnson became prime minister in July 2019, he became chief secretary of the Treasury and was promoted to succeed Sajid Javid as chancellor the following February. Prime minister close to Sunak and Javid's departure In his resignation letter, 42-year-old Sunak told the Prime Minister that he was stepping down "in deep sadness". He said: “Resigning from ministerial office is a serious matter at any time. I realize this may be my last ministerial post, but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and I am therefore resigning. "I have served as your Chancellor with gratitude for entrusting me with responsibility for the nation's economy and finances. Sunak said he has always tried to make "compromises" in order to support the prime minister in his goals. Such is the nature of collective government on which our system is based and it is particularly important that the Prime Minister and Chancellor remain united in difficult times like the ones we are living through today," he wrote. However, Sunak said he could no longer support Johnson. "In preparation for our planned joint speech on the economy next week, it has become clear to me that our approaches are fundamentally too different. In reply to Sunak's letter, Johnson thanked Sunak for his "outstanding service to the country at the most difficult time for our economy in the history of peacetime." He said he would "miss working with you in government" but made no mention of non-economic matters. Earlier this year, it became clear just how badly Sunak and Johnson's relationship had fallen apart. In February, Sunak squarely distanced himself from the Prime Minister's claim that Sir Keir Starmer, as head of the public prosecutor's office from 2008 to 2013, "failed to prosecute Jimmy Savile". Johnson was optimistic, but Sunak agonized over whether to stop. Even after he decided to stay, few MPs believed his heart was at work. Nadhim Zahawi, who succeeds Sunak, must now manage Johnson's desire to "take Britain to a higher level", cut taxes and help Britons through the cost of living crisis. Amid recession warnings and rising inflationary pressures, the new resident of 11 Downing Street will find a Prime Minister with big spending plans. It was Sunak's restrictive approach to the country's finances - more cautious than that of the prime minister - that he referred to in his resignation letter, which may pose a bigger problem than his concerns about standards. Nadhim Zahawi only joined the cabinet as Education Minister in September Zahawi, who only joined the Cabinet as Education Minister in September, now holds one of the most important posts in the government. In an interview just this week he warned that the Tories had to demonstrate "stewardship of the economy" and that the party had to "cut taxes". In his new role, Zahawi must map out a way to help families in trouble, in a way that's palatable to conservative backbenchers unhappy with the measures put in place so far. He'll probably also be asked to find ways to cut taxes. Backbench MPs are deeply uneasy at the fact that the tax burden is at its highest since the 1940s. Johnson told a meeting of MPs last night: "I know you're all eager for tax cuts and tonight's events may make implementation a little easier." match inflation to try and wait out part of the strikes planned for the summer. As education minister, he had offered teachers a 9 percent pay rise. Gross domestic product, a measure of the size of the economy, fell 0.3 percent in April. Inflation hit a 40-year high at 9.1 percent. Johnson and Sunak were due to deliver a joint speech on the economy - the "growth plan" - next week. However, Sunak said in his resignation letter that "I have realized that our approaches are fundamentally too different." Zahawi must decide whether to postpone the speech, make his own proposals, or accept Johnson's. Other names typed for the chancellor's job included Liz Truss, Simon Clarke and Priti Patel.

Read

They know it's game over for Boris Johnson when Rishi Sunak and co find her spine

Annie Brown says the Pincher scandal is just another party gate with no appetizers. (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonThe Pincher scandal is just another no-bite partygate, an all-too-familiar cheesy tale of No10 betrayal and disgrace. We'll likely never know exactly what Boris Johnson knew and when about former deputy chief whip Chris Pincher's alleged sexually predatory behavior. Pincher resigned after attacking two other patrons at the Carlton Club - a private Tory party members' club in London's Piccadilly - last Wednesday night. And now officials are taking the rare step of openly breaking through the cop and attacking the prime minister's lies. Johnson's own cabinet ministers are so bereft of their will to defend themselves that most refuse to speak to the media about Pincher. Junior Secretary Will Quince was snapped out of the dark to make an early press and dutifully denied the Prime Minister knew anything. Quince naively went on TV and said he spoke to No. 10 and asked "firmly and clearly" what happened. He said it was made clear to him that "the Prime Minister was not aware of any allegations or complaints made against former Deputy Chief Whip Chris Pincher". Quince, Minister for Children, has been sent back to his office to tackle the big issues, like whether Noddy is the right school book to read. Next, the Prime Minister's trusty walkie-talkie doll, Dominic Raab, was sent out to sneak through interviews. Raab has made obfuscation an art form, but even he looked like his batteries were draining as the day wore on. He summed it up: "My feeling was that Chris Pincher was indeed an exceptional Minister and was well respected." Translation: Aside from the men he fondled, he was a good egg. But while Raab was on the air at the BBC Breakfast, former top official Lord McDonald tweeted his bombshell letter, claiming the Prime Minister had been "personally briefed" on a complaint about Pincher at the time. But in the face of such blatant lies, he couldn't keep his mouth shut and clarified that Johnson had been personally briefed on "pincher by name, pincher by nature." McDonald must have set his watch because the timing of the tweet was impeccable and nice to see Raab's reaction live on screen. When confronted about the bomb on air, Raab looked like he was contemplating whether to answer the question or fake a stroke. How Raab must have longed for the day when Piers Morgan drowned out Susanna's journalism with random cries of "snowflakes". Yes, Rabb said a complaint against Pincher was upheld, but that doesn't make him "guilty." The former head of public service then explained a pattern of No. 10 that attempted to "mislead and confuse stories." Lord Kerslake said it was "inconceivable" that the PM's entourage was unaware of the allegations of sexual misconduct. Officials might throw a slipper on TV when frustrated with the government, they never tweet hoarse claims about the prime minister. Pincher was promoted to Deputy Chief Whip for his loyalty during the no-confidence vote against Johnson. Another no-confidence vote is under way, but ultimately we'll all have to sit here and be ruled by sex wreckers and liars until the Tories decide. Surely they'll have to find a conscience at some point and rid us of men like Johnson, Raab and Pincher. The country's birth rate is declining and we will face labor shortages in the future. But according to demographer Dr. Paul Morland, we should tax the childless. In a national newspaper, Morland suggested populating our land with our own people. He said we should "get most of our population growth from births in our racially and ethnically diverse country, not from immigration." Morland said we should "encourage families to have more children and have them when they are younger." This may sound familiar to viewers of The Handmaid's Tale, the idea of ​​young women being reduced to breeding factories. If women want to have children when they are young, that's great, but they should never feel pressured into making that decision. Instead of taxing childless couples, we should raise taxes on the rich. Increased immigration is not only the answer to our population shortages, but also to the global refugee crisis. Gentleminions, teenagers in suits, are barred from screenings of the latest Despicable Me spin-off. The craze follows a TikTok craze where teenagers dress up and film themselves screaming Minion gibberish into the movie. It's hardly razor sharp gang material and these kids have been locked up for two years so just let them be Minions for a few hours.

Read

Nadhim Zahawi becomes Chancellor and Steve Barclay Health Secretary, replacing Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid - UK Politics Live

The education secretary replaces Sunak with Steve Barclay, who becomes the new health secretary (Author: Gardener)

Nadhim ZahawiThe education secretary replaces Sunak with Steve Barclay, who becomes the new health secretary. Andrew Mitchell, a former Conservative chief whip, has compared Boris Johnson to Russia's Rasputin. It's a bit like the death of Rasputin. He was poisoned, stabbed, he was shot, his body was thrown into the freezing river and he's still alive.” Mitchell added that he believed it was “over” for the prime minister. Well, I'm afraid it's over and the question now is how long this can go on." "This is an abnormal Prime Minister - brilliantly charismatic, very funny, very amusing, a big, big character, but I'm afraid he is has neither the character nor the temperament to be our Prime Minister." "It's a bit like the death of Rasputin. He's been poisoned, stabbed, he's been shot, his body dumped in a freezing river and he's still alive.” But former Chief Whip Andrew Mitchell MP says “it's over” for Boris Johnson's premiership#Newsnight pic.twitter. com/RDmpppspzt - BBC Newsnight (@BBCNewsnight) July 5, 2022 Labor leader Keir Starmer has said government ministers are "complicit" in the prime minister's embarrassment of his office. You supported him when he mocked the sacrifices of the British people," he told reporters today. On a difficult day for Boris Johnson tonight the Chancellor, the Health Secretary, four Parliamentary private secretaries, the Conservative Deputy Leader, two trade envoys and the Attorney General all resigned. The exodus was triggered by Sajid Javid, who resigned as Minister of Health, followed a few minutes later by Chancellor Rishi Sunak. Javid said: "I regret that I can no longer continue in good conscience," while Sunak said the government should be run "decently, competently and seriously". Most of the remaining members of the cabinet expressed support for Johnson to remain prime minister. Nadhim Zahawi was appointed as the new chancellor. Steve Barclay has been announced as the new health secretary, while Michelle Donelan has been named the new education secretary. MP Bim Afolami announced his resignation as Tory Deputy Leader live on TalkTV. A quick poll by YouGov tonight found 69% of Brits say Boris Johnson should resign. Michelle Donelan takes over as Minister for Education after just two years as Minister, succeeding Nadhim Zahawi, who has been rewarded for her loyalty and acquiescence in the culture wars and university containment that have been a hallmark of Boris Johnson's government. Rising from her current role as Minister for Higher Education and Further Education, Donelan must quickly deal with a mess of unfinished business left by Zahawi in his brief 10-month tenure, most notably the school law that was foisted on the new chancellor last week gutted after opposition from former ministers and supporters in the Lords. But Donelan has impressed those who work with her for her no-nonsense attitude and as someone who — unlike Zahawi or Johnson — doesn't care about bureaucracy or friendships. See also: Michelle Donelan: Rewarded for her loyalty and no-nonsense attitude Boris Johnson appoints Nadhim Zahawi Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Cabinet Room at 10 Downing Street. The new Chancellor of the Exchequer Nadhim Zahawi in his office at 11 Downing Street. Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell, a former Chief Whip, has compared Boris Johnson to Rasputin. "It's a bit like the death of Rasputin. He was poisoned, he was stabbed, he was shot, his body was thrown into the freezing river and he's still alive," Mitchell told BBC Newsnight. He also insisted it was "over" for the Prime Minister. "This is an abnormal Prime Minister - brilliantly charismatic, very funny, very amusing, a great, great character but I'm afraid he has neither the character nor the temper to be our Prime Minister." Tory backbench Andrew Bridgen has Boris Johnson warned that the 1922 backbench committee will "deal" with his leadership. “The 1922 Committee is going to deal with this tumultuous Prime Minister, that's what it was created for.” Johnson faces maneuvering from Conservative MPs hoping to change the 1922 Committee's rules to repeat a vote of confidence in him. Steve Barclay said it was "an honor" to take on the role of health secretary, replacing Sajid Javid, who resigned tonight. Barclay said: "Our NHS and social care staff have shown us time and time again - throughout the pandemic and beyond - what it means to work with compassion and dedication to make a difference. “This Government is investing more than ever in our NHS and care services to tackle the Covid backlog, hire 50,000 more nurses, reform social care and ensure patients across the country have access to the care they need. It is with great sadness that I step down as Attorney General. pic.twitter.com/8kr9ecRECg - Alex Chalk (@AlexChalkChelt) July 5, 2022 Theo Clarke, MP for Stafford, has resigned as trade envoy for Kenya and has written a letter to Boris Johnson telling him he has a "serious lack of judgement". the appointment of Chris Pincher as deputy chief whip. She wrote: "As a staunch member of the Conservative Party, I have always supported this government and I have personally supported you over the past few years, including campaigning for you in both of your London mayoral races. "As one of the party's new female MPs and a member of the Special Committee on Women and Equality, I take allegations of sexual misconduct very seriously. To learn that you have chosen to promote a colleague to the position of MP chaplaincy when you are fully aware of his own wrongdoing shows a serious lack of judgment and caring for your parliamentary party. I was shocked to see colleagues defending the government with assurances that turned out to be false. This is not how a responsible government should act. "I think we have to draw a line under the current debacle and get the government under control on behalf of the public and above all the country." Shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves has accused the new Chancellor of acting in her own interests. The Labor MP tweeted on Tuesday night after the appointment of Nadhim Zahawi as Chancellor that the Cabinet was backing a "failing Prime Minister". Tory ministers and MPs continue to prop up a failing Prime Minister. Our country and our economy need leaders who act in our best interests. It is clear that the prime minister and the chancellor act only in their own way. — Rachel Reeves (@RachelReevesMP) July 5, 2022 Johnson says he wants to give Chris Pincher a chance to "prove he can do better." Here are the key points from Boris Johnson's pooled TV clip (which unfortunately is already old). Johnson apologized for appointing Chris Pincher to his government. He gave Pincher two ministerial posts before making him Deputy Chief Whip in February. When asked if that was a serious mistake, Johnson replied: Yes, I think it was a mistake and I apologize for that. I just want to be absolutely clear that there is no place in this administration for anyone who is predatory or who abuses their position of power. Johnson did not deny calling the MP "pincher by name, pincher by nature." Johnson said if he had another chance he would have fired Pincher after the inappropriate incident while he was at the State Department. He said: About three years ago, a complaint was filed against Chris Pincher in the Foreign Office. The complaint was resolved, he apologized, it was brought to me. And you know, if I had my time again, I would look back on it and realize he wouldn't learn anything and he wouldn't change, and I regret that. Johnson denied claims that he asked his press office to lie on his behalf about what he knew about the Pincher allegations. When this was presented to him, Johnson replied: No, and let me explain what happened. We're talking about a series of events or a series of appointments over several years. So Chris Pincher came into government as Deputy Chief Whip before I became Prime Minister, he was posted to the Foreign Office. And then we reassigned him to be deputy chief whip. As I said, about two and a half years ago I got this complaint. But I wish we - I in particular - had acted on it and he hadn't continued to be governed because then I'm afraid he's continued to behave - as far as we can see, according to the allegations that we have - very, very badly , and I feel sorry for those who have been badly affected. When told that his office said he knew nothing about specific allegations against Pincher when told about the 2019 allegations, Johnson said he forgot he was told about them. I'm afraid I was concentrating on other things at the time. But what I am telling you now is my recollection of events. And I remember there was a complaint that was raised with me specifically [the one that was raised with him in 2019, which he said was "resolved". * Johnson said he wanted to give Pincher a second chance. What I wanted was to give Chris Pincher the opportunity, if not when in doubt, to prove he could do better. And I'm afraid he couldn't. When asked if people could trust him, he replied: I'll tell you exactly what happened. And I come out to explain. Because I'm sick of people saying or trying to say things on my behalf, if I do say so myself.

Read

when Steve Barclay replaces Sajid Javid as Secretary of Health

In his resignation letter, Mr Sunak said "the public has a right to expect the government to be run properly, competently and reputably," adding: "I believe these standards are worth fighting for and that's why I'm resigning." .” (Author: Gardener)

Steve BarclayNadhim Zahawi has been named as Boris Johnson's new chancellor after Rishi Sunak dramatically abandoned the role tonight. The resignation of Mr Sunak and fellow minister Sajid Javid has left the Prime Minister fighting to remain in office amid questions about his handling of the dispute over MP Chris Pincher. Steve Barclay has been appointed Health Secretary, replacing Mr Javid. In his resignation letter, Mr Sunak said "the public has a right to expect the government to be run properly, competently and reputably," adding: "I believe these standards are worth fighting for and that's why I'm resigning." .” In the letter, published on Twitter, the now-former Chancellor said he could no longer remain loyal to the Prime Minister, who remained mired in the scandal over Mr Pincher's appointment as Deputy Chief Whip. Mr Pincher quit the role last week after allegations he groped two men at a private members' club, and Mr Johnson was told of allegations against him back in 2019. Mr Sunak, who is seen as a potential future leader of the Conservative Party, told the Prime Minister he left "with great sadness": "Resigning from a ministerial post is a serious matter at any time." But the public rightly expects the government to be orderly, competent and run seriously. I recognize that this may be my last ministerial job but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and that is why I am resigning." The Prime Minister conceded that he should have sacked Mr Pincher when it was established , that he had behaved inappropriately when he was Foreign Secretary in 2019 but appointed him to other government posts instead. But the Prime Minister's apology for appointing Mr Pincher to that role failed to prevent the departure of Mr Sunak and Mr Javid , who were only minutes apart Mr Javid said the British people "expect integrity from their government" but voters now believed Mr Johnson's government was neither competent nor "acting in the national interest". Mr Zahawi was after appointed Chancellor after the dramatic resignation of Rishi Sunak on Tuesday evening nd his success as Vaccines Secretary in Boris Johnson's latest reshuffle to Education Secretary boosted Javid's resignation, the Prime Minister told the former Health Secretary he was "sorry" to receive his letter and suggested his government would "continue to deliver" plans for the NHS . The twin resignations of Mr Javid and Mr Sunak mean Mr Johnson's position remains dangerous, but Cabinet ministers including Dominic Raab, Liz Truss, Michael Gove, Therese Coffey and Ben Wallace said they would remain in government and would continue to support the Prime Minister. The post of leader of the Conservative Party remains vacant, as does the role of deputy party leader following the departure of Bim Afolami, who resigned on live television on Tuesday night. The Prime Minister is also now recruiting the fourth Downing Street chief of staff of his tenure after appointing Mr Barclay as Health Secretary. A total of four parliamentary private secretaries also resigned. The PM's fate could ultimately rest with backbench MPs if Tory 1922 Committee rules are changed to allow for another vote of confidence within 12 months. The Prime Minister narrowly survived a vote of confidence last month, but suffered a bigger rebellion than Theresa May. Some 211 MPs voted in favor of the Prime Minister, compared to 148 against - a majority of 63. The result meant 59% of Conservative MPs backed Mr Johnson and 41% voted against him.

Read

Boris Johnson is fighting to remain in office after Rishi Sunak was replaced by Nadhim Zahawi following Sajid Javid's resignation

Boris Johnson is struggling to stay in office after Rishi Sunak was replaced by Nadhim Zahawi after Sajid Javid resigned - Prime Minister Steve Barclay's ultra-loyalist to become Health Secretary (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonBoris Johnson was fighting to remain in office after the shock double resignations of Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Health Secretary Sajid Javid. The prime minister quickly filled the vacant cabinet posts with education minister Nadhim Zahawi moving to No. 11 and Steve Barclay, a key ally, who was appointed health minister. Minister of State for Universities Michelle Donelan will fill Nadhim Zahawi's old role, Downing Street said. Nadhim Zahawi clutched a brown envelope and remained expressionless as he approached a car waiting at Downing Street before driving off after being appointed the new Chancellor. Accepting the two resignations, an upbeat Mr Johnson vowed to "continue to deliver" his government's plans, but a quick YouGov poll on Tuesday night found 69 per cent of Britons now think the Prime Minister himself should resign. On Tuesday, Mr Sunak and Mr Javid left the cabinet in less than 20 minutes, citing concerns about the prime minister's leadership and the standards of his government. Bim Afolami also resigned as vice leader of the Conservative Party while speaking to TalkTV. But most Cabinet ministers remained loyal to Mr Johnson, including Deputy Prime Minister and Justice Secretary Dominic Raab, Home Secretary Priti Patel and Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng. Jacob Rees-Mogg has confirmed he will continue to support Boris Johnson as Prime Minister. The Brexit Opportunities Minister told Sky News: "The Prime Minister has won a major mandate in a general election, a vote by the British people and that should not be taken away from him because a number of people are stepping down." In his resignation letter, Mr Sunak said, "the public has a right to expect government to be properly, competently and honestly run". He added: "I believe these standards are worth fighting for and that is why I am resigning." Boris Johnson replied that he was "sorry" to have received Mr Sunak's resignation letter and praised his "outstanding service". In a letter, the prime minister wrote: “Dear Rishi, I am sorry to receive your letter of resignation from the government. He hailed tax cuts and the furlough scheme before concluding: "I have enormously appreciated your advice and deep commitment to public service and will miss working with you in government." In a fire letter, Mr Javid said the British people " expect integrity from his government," but voters now believed Mr Johnson's government was neither competent nor "acting in the national interest". I spoke to the Prime Minister to offer my resignation as Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. pic.twitter.com/d5RBFGPqXp - Sajid Javid (@sajidjavid) July 5, 2022 Mr Johnson faced more resignations as three more MPs left his government following the shock resignations of Mr Sunak and Mr Javid. Jonathan Gullis, described as Johnson's "ultra-loyalist", resigned from his role as parliamentary private secretary to the Foreign Secretary for Northern Ireland, saying the Conservative Party was "more focused on dealing with our reputational damage than doing anything for the people to accomplish this country". Conservative MP Saqib Bhatti resigned his role as parliamentary private secretary to the health minister, saying "recent events have undermined trust and standards in public life". MP Nicola Richards resigned, saying: "I will always be loyal to my constituents and to the Conservative Party. Tonight I have made the difficult decision to step down as PPS.” Virginia Crosbie has given up her role as parliamentary private secretary in the Welsh office, saying she “can no longer defend” the Prime Minister's actions. Posting her resignation on Facebook, the Ynys Mon MP wrote: "I have to say that the sheer number of allegations of inappropriateness and illegality - many of which have centered on Downing Street and your position as Prime Minister - makes your position simply untenable. MP Theo Clarke resigned as trade envoy for Kenya and said she was "shocked" to see her colleagues defending the government with "reassurances that turned out to be false". The resignations come as Mr Johnson was forced into a humiliating apology for his handling of the Chris Pincher row after it was revealed he forgot to have been briefed on previous allegations of "inappropriate" behaviour. Mr Pincher quit as deputy chief whipper last week after alleging he groped two men at a private members' club, but Mr Johnson was informed of allegations against him as early as 2019. The Prime Minister conceded that he should have sacked Mr Pincher when he was informed of the allegations against him when he was Foreign Office Secretary in 2019, but instead Mr Johnson appointed him to other government posts. When asked if that was a mistake, Mr Johnson said: "I think it was a mistake and I apologize for that. The public rightly expects government to be properly, competently and honestly run. My letter to the Prime Minister below. pic.twitter. com/vZ1APB1ik1 - Rishi Sunak (@RishiSunak) July 5, 2022 Mr Sunak said he had "reluctantly come to the decision that we cannot go on like this." In his letter to the Prime Minister, he wrote: "The public is right to expect that the government is doing this properly, competently and seriously. I recognize that this may be my last ministerial job, but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and I am therefore resigning." I recognize that this may be my last ministerial job, but I believe that those standards are worth fighting for and that's why I'm resigning." In his letter to the Prime Minister, Mr Javid told the Prime Minister that "the tone you set as a leader and the values ​​you represent , your colleagues, your party and ultimately the country". He said the Tory party "may not always be popular, but we have been competent at acting in the national interest. He added: "The country needs a strong and principled Conservative party and the party is bigger than any individual Mr Johnson wrote back saying Mr Javid had served the UK government and people with 'distinction' Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer sa gt that Mr Johnson's government is now "collapsing". He said: "After all the filth, the scandals and the failures, it is clear that this government is now collapsing. The Tory Cabinet Ministers have known who this Prime Minister is all along. The British public is undeceived: "The Tory party is corrupt and one man will not fix it. Only real change of government can give Britain the fresh start it needs." In another major blow to the PM, former Brexit minister and close ally of Mr Johnson Lord Frost tweeted his support for Mr Sunak and Mr Javid, saying: "In short, Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid did the right thing." It makes I am not happy to say this and had hoped that events would have taken a different course, but I fear developments over the past week show that even the Prime Minister has no chance of introducing the necessary change in approach to running a government or the establishment of a new political direction... "Accordingly, and with sadness, I believe in the interests of the country...our newfound self-government and Conservative Party would be best served with a new leadership and a new prime minister." The leader of the Liberal Democrats, Sir Ed Davey, upping the pressure on Mr Johnson to quit, said in a Statement: "Boris Johnson must go, his reign of chaos has failed our country."

Read

Boris Johnson is close to the resignation of Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid

Boris Johnson's prime ministership is at stake after Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid attacked the prime minister and resigned from cabinet. The chancellor and health (Author: Gardener)

Rishi SunakBoris Johnson's prime ministership is at stake after Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid attacked the prime minister and resigned from cabinet. The chancellor and health minister resigned within ten minutes in what appeared to be a coordinated move that dealt a potentially fatal blow to the prime minister. Both attacked Johnson's integrity, with Sunak saying he resigned because high standards in politics "are worth fighting for" and that "we cannot go on like this". Javid said the British people have the right "to expect integrity from their government" and that the Conservative Party is "greater than any single person". • Who will replace Boris Johnson and be the next Prime Minister? Johnson's opponents said they would push for a second confidence vote for the prime minister before the summer recess if he doesn't agree to step down first. However, Johnson told his allies that he was determined to keep fighting. After a power struggle, Education Minister Nadhim Zahawi was promoted to Chancellor. There were claims he threatened to resign if he didn't get the job, although this has been denied by allies. Liz Truss, the Secretary of State, was closely associated with the role. Zahawi is said to be open to rolling back corporate tax hikes, which are expected to rise from 19 percent to 25 percent next year. He said when he met Johnson that they acted as "guides" for international companies when they were considering investing. A Johnson ally claimed Sunak resisted tax cuts: "We end up with a better suited chancellor to boost the economy rather than balance the books." Zahawi was replaced in education by Michelle Donelan, the universities minister. Prime Minister's Chief of Staff Steve Barclay has been promoted to Health Secretary. Nadhim Zahawi emerges as Chancellor from Number 10 after an extraordinary power struggle. The resignations came after Johnson admitted he had been warned about the behavior of Chris Pincher, his former assistant chief whip, two and a half years ago but had not acted. Downing Street initially claimed Johnson was not aware of any "specific allegations" against Pincher, a defense severely undermined on Tuesday morning when it emerged he had been made aware of a formal complaint in 2019. The PM tried to stem the damage by publicly apologizing for keeping Pincher in government, but minutes later Javid and Sunak went public with their resignation letters. In his letter to Johnson, he said that "public confidence in No 10's ability to uphold the standards of openness expected of a UK government has collapsed irretrievably". Rebel Conservatives are expecting Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 backbench committee, to tell Johnson he no longer has a majority and that his time at No 10 is up. The rebels also hope they can win a majority for the committee's executive branch in next week's elections. This would allow them to change the party's rules of conduct so that a second confidence vote on Johnson could be held before May next year. The PM survived a confidence vote last month, with current rules saying he cannot be challenged for 12 months. A number of junior ministers resigned after Sunak and Javid left, including Jonathan Gullis, Saqib Bhatti and Nicola Richards, all of whom were parliamentary private secretaries. Bim Afolami, a deputy leader of the party, resigned along with Andrew Murrison, the trade envoy for Morocco. Samantha Cohen, a former private secretary to the Queen, was due to be promoted to the role of chief of staff following Barclay's promotion. Statements of support from the remaining cabinet ministers improved Johnson's immediate chances of survival. Dominic Raab, the Deputy Prime Minister, Truss and Priti Patel, the Home Secretary, all said they would remain in office. • The Times view: Johnson should resign now Close allies of the Prime Minister also mobilized, with Jacob Rees-Mogg suggesting Sunak's resignation could be good for Johnson. "I think a government works best when it has a chancellor and a prime minister working hand in hand," he said, adding that Johnson could still win a future vote of confidence. He said he hopes to continue as a leader. Seven in 10 Brits say Johnson should resign, according to a quick poll of more than 3,000 people. YouGov said that was an 11-point increase from the number of people who supported the Prime Minister's resignation on June 9. Nadhim Zahawi will join the Treasury with the unenviable task of guiding the country through a severe cost-of-living crisis. Amid recession warnings and rising inflationary pressures, the new resident of 11 Downing Street will find a Prime Minister with big spending plans. It was Rishi Sunak's restrictive approach to the country's finances - more cautious than the prime minister's - that he referred to in his resignation letter, perhaps a bigger problem than his concerns about standards. Zahawi, who only joined the cabinet as Minister of Education in September, now holds one of the most important posts in the government. In an interview just this week he warned that the Tories had to demonstrate "stewardship of the economy" and that the party had to "cut taxes". During his previous tenure as Vaccines Secretary, he gained a reputation as an able media and parliamentary performer. In his new role, Zahawi must map out a way to help families in trouble, in a way that's palatable to conservative backbenchers unhappy with the measures put in place so far. He'll probably also be asked to find ways to cut taxes. Backbench MPs are deeply uneasy at the fact that the tax burden is at its highest since the 1940s. Johnson told a meeting of MPs last night: "I know you're all eager for tax cuts and tonight's events may make implementation a little easier." Other names typed for the chancellor's job were Liz Truss , Simon Clarke and Priti Patel. Finally, and (hopefully) in time, the PM's cabinet mates found a spine where their wishbones were. Where I'm from right now, people who don't even know each other have been hugging or high-fiving in front of the pub. But don't assume Boris Johnson will leave before he's shoved. He will know that his group is likely to speed up the process to present a second vote of confidence in their leader; he will know that in such a vote he would probably lose. Johnson will know the lyrics from the Evita hit: "You'll get by, you always have before" - and in fact he always has. Downing Street could tell us that the Prime Minister was "focused" on the recent crisis and that talk of leadership challenges was unpatriotic. Steve Barclay is Johnson's third health secretary in the past year. Johnson's chief of staff has become one of the prime minister's most trusted lieutenants and has been entrusted with a series of increasingly tricky tasks. After serving as junior health secretary in 2018, he was known for his relentless focus on efficiency, which is likely to be a key priority as he anticipates huge public health backlogs. As Minister of Health, he is to focus on waiting lists for routine care. There are 6.5 million people on the waiting list in England and Sajid Javid, Barclay's predecessor, admitted the number was likely to continue to rise over the next two years. Hospitals are struggling to resume pre-pandemic activity levels and there are doubts they will meet the goal of eliminating two-year waits for treatment by the end of the month. Unions are likely to vote on strikes in the coming months demanding a "restoration of wages" representing a hike of up to 30 percent. Johnson keeps fighting but he will fight to rule When an ally asked Boris Johnson tonight if he would quit, his reply was emphatic: 'F*** that'. The prime minister told aides that it was "business as usual" and that he was determined to keep fighting. Although there is a widespread view within the Tory party that Johnson can't recover, that doesn't mean he won't try. Unless the Prime Minister can be persuaded to change his mind, or the Committee of 1922 to change its rules, the country faces a time when governance will take a distant second to an increasingly desperate struggle for survival . Even ministers loyal to Johnson are in private despair as the prime minister's already damaged authority over his party appears to be crumbling. With a procession of resignations from government and new MPs coming forward with calls for the PM's resignation, the question is whether Johnson can no longer wield the parliamentary authority he needs to govern. The Chris Pincher affair has already shown how his Downing Street company struggles to keep the government agenda from being drowned out by a series of missteps and unintentional mistakes. As determined as he may be to persevere, Johnson may now find that he simply is unable to get his MPs to do his bidding. History suggests that the resignation of two senior ministers with personal attacks on the prime minister is fatal. Johnson should know this better than most: his resignation as Foreign Secretary over Brexit marked the beginning of the end of Theresa May's time at Downing Street. But it was nine agonizing months since resigning alongside other Brexit ministers in 2018 before May finally resigned. If this is the beginning of the end, the final act can take days or months. Johnson's situation is in some ways more serious than May's because criticism of outgoing ministers focuses on his personal integrity rather than his policies. But he has made it absolutely clear that he must be evicted from Downing Street. Sir Keir Starmer has called for a general election as Labor seek to capitalize on the disorder at Downing Street. The Labor leader said the government was collapsing and an election had to be called within weeks. He said Johnson was unfit to become prime minister and was critical of Sunak and Javid. "Today's resignation means nothing against their complicity for all those months that they should see him for what he was, they knew who he was," he said. When asked if he would support general elections in just a few weeks, Starmer said, "Yes. We need a fresh start for Britain. We need a change of government.” This government is collapsing and members of the Tory cabinet have backed Boris Johnson.” Labor has enjoyed a consistent lead in the polls for the past six months, winning the recent Red Wall by-election in Wakefield. However, Starmer's own personal approval ratings suggest voters are yet to become friends with him, two years after he replaced Jeremy Corbyn. Overall, 54 percent of voters believe he is doing poorly as Labor leader, compared to just 29 percent who think he is doing well, according to YouGov. Starmer has staked his leadership on the outcome of an inquiry by Durham Police into whether he broke lockdown rules. The Labor leader has vowed to resign if he is fined for attending the beer and curry night during his election campaign last year. Rebel Conservatives expect Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 backbench committee, to tell Johnson his time as Prime Minister is up. Johnson's opponents insist there is now a majority of Conservative MPs who want a new leader. A number of senior Conservatives have urged Johnson to quit before he is ousted, including Lord Frost, the man who brokered the Government's Brexit deal, who said there was "no chance" that the Prime Minister would make the necessary Changes can be made to continue No. 10. Just a month ago, the prime minister won a vote of confidence from his group and received the support of 59 percent of his MPs. But his goodwill in the party has continued to corrode ever since, particularly in recent days amid the unruly fallout from the Chris Pincher affair. Several Conservative MPs who voted for the Prime Minister in that vote of confidence publicly said last night that they have now changed their minds. The rebels said it was the job of Brady, the chairman of the 1922 Conservative backbenchers' committee, to tell Johnson he had to resign. Conservative MPs publicly stated they had sent fresh letters of no confidence to the Prime Minister and urged Brady to change the rules to allow another PM vote. Anthony Browne, MP for South Cambridgeshire, tweeted the letter he sent to Brady last night, saying the rules needed to be changed as the current situation was "completely unsustainable". He wrote: "I am writing to you for the second time in a month to confirm that I have lost confidence in the Prime Minister and believe that unless he resigns he must be impeached." A senior rebel told The Times: “The prime minister simply no longer has a majority in the party. Under the committee's rules, Johnson cannot submit another vote of confidence until next June, but that can be changed by a simple majority of the 18-member executive of the panel. Rebels are running for executive branch election this month, hoping to force a rule change and another vote of confidence within weeks. Sunak, once seen as Johnson's heir apparent, has lost his status with Tory MPs in recent months after raising the tax burden to its highest level since the 1950s. He also scrambled to answer questions about his wife's tax affairs after it was revealed she was claiming Non-Dom status. However, he may have improved his chances by exiting the cabinet before most of his peers. In his resignation letter, the Chancellor sought to reiterate his commitment to tax cuts in a message carefully tailored to appeal to Tory members and MPs. Ben Wallace 7/1 The defense secretary is a longtime ally of the prime minister and was quick to declare his support for Johnson. His stock has risen dramatically thanks to his handling of the war in Ukraine and is the most popular cabinet minister with Conservative members; He came out on top in a poll this week asking activists who the party's next leader should be. Popular with One Nation MPs, Jeremy Hunt has a close network of supporters who are likely to help him gain another leadership position. However, his limited appeal for Tory membership was shown when he lost to Johnson in a two-horse race in 2019 with 34 per cent of the vote. He was beaten in a leadership race by eight other candidates in a ConHome poll on potential runoffs. The Foreign Secretary has consistently topped the rankings of the most popular cabinet ministers among Tory citizens. She declared her allegiance to Johnson tonight, but many expect her to run when he goes. Truss has tried to brush up on her conservative credentials by championing free trade and tax cuts. The extent of her parliamentary support is unclear, but she has hosted "Fizz with Liz" meetings with backbenchers to improve her standing. Nadhim Zahawi was silent tonight. Nadhim Zahawi 1.11. The education secretary is well liked and has yet to declare his support for Johnson. Allies expect him to seek prime minister and he refused to rule out a candidacy three times in the last month in an interview. He was Johnson's vaccines secretary - overseeing one of the key policy achievements of that administration - and was promoted to the Department of Education. A former German chancellor and interior minister, he has long harbored leadership ambitions, but finished the 2019 race in a disappointing fourth place. He was health secretary for just a year but is one of the most trusted figures on the Conservative benches. He was the first cabinet minister to resign, which may have given him a head start. Penny Mordaunt is one of the most prominent candidates outside of Johnson's cabinet. She is yet to step down from her position at the Department for International Trade but signaled her ambitions by publishing a book setting out her vision for a post-pandemic Britain. The chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee has never held a ministerial post and his lack of experience can be used against him. But he is popular with the party's One Nation wing and if Hunt is struggling to find support, some MPs may be tempted to switch allegiance to Tugendhat. Rishi Sunak has resigned from Treasury on the eve of a big day: Tomorrow the threshold for paying Social Security will rise to £12,570. He was also set to join Johnson next week in devising a new cost-of-living plan. Johnson warned five times about Pincher Johnson apologized today for keeping Chris Pincher in government, as The Times was told the Prime Minister had been warned five times about his conduct. In a television interview, Johnson said he should have fired Pincher when he learned of the allegations against him when he was Secretary of State in 2019. Instead, he appointed him to two more government posts. Johnson said he wanted to "apologize to everyone who has been severely affected". He added: "I want to be absolutely clear that there is no place in this administration for anyone who is predatory or who abuses their position of power." But The Times understands Johnson has been warned on five separate occasions of allegations against Pincher, which are outlined here. The first came when he became prime minister in 2019 and Pincher was touted as a potential Tory chief whip. Johnson is said to have quipped, "Pinch by name and pinch by nature." The second warning came in late 2019 after foreign officials complained about Pincher's behavior. This was raised with Simon McDonald, the Permanent Secretary, and sparked an investigation by Helen MacNamara, the Cabinet Office's Ethics Czar. She informed Johnson that the inquest was taking place and later that it was completed without clearing Pincher. Government sources told The Times that the issue was raised again with Johnson when he reshuffled his government in 2020. "In the run-up to the reshuffle, concerns were raised about Chris' conduct at the Foreign Office," a source said. “It was about overtime and a drinking culture with the minister. Pincher's conduct was addressed again in a reshuffle earlier this year when he was appointed deputy chief whip. His appointment had been delayed while the Cabinet Office's ethics team was asked to investigate. Welcome to tonight's live coverage of politics as Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resign from Boris Johnson's cabinet. Sajid Javid and Rishi Sunak attended a cabinet meeting with the Prime Minister this morning

Read

Boris Johnson hangs by a thread as Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid walk out

Boris Johnson hangs by a thread as Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid walk out (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonRishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resigned within minutes on Tuesday. Boris Johnson struggled to save his position as prime minister on Tuesday night after two of his oldest cabinet ministers resigned within 10 minutes of each other. First Sajid Javid, the health minister, and then Rishi Sunak, the chancellor, posted letters on their Twitter accounts explaining why they could not stay in their posts. Mr Johnson struggled to fill in the gaps in the front bench even as more resignations from government positions were announced. Nadhim Zahawi, Minister of Education, was appointed as the new Chancellor. Mr Johnson and Mr Zahawi are understood to have agreed on the need for tax cuts to safeguard growth when they met in person on Tuesday night. Michelle Donelan, the universities minister, will replace Mr Zahawi as education minister, while Steve Barclay, Downing Street's chief of staff, has been appointed to replace Mr Javid as health minister. But four parliamentary private secretaries and a Tory deputy leader followed Mr Javid and Mr Sunak out the door, with speculation more resignations to come. Mr Johnson is set to face questions from the Prime Minister and an appearance before the Liaison Committee of senior backbenchers on Wednesday as he tries to regain control of his party. Shortly after the resignations were announced, the Prime Minister addressed a group of around 80 Tory MPs at a pre-arranged meeting on Tuesday and made it clear he would go ahead. In a dig at Mr Sunak, he pointed out that tax cuts would be easier to enforce after the developments. A quick poll by YouGov found 54 per cent of Conservative voters said Mr Johnson should step down, up 20 percentage points from June 9. Spending and tax cuts were unrealistic, saying: "Our people know when something is too good." , to be true then it is not true.” It came minutes after Mr Javid said in his letter the British people expect “integrity” and criticized the lack of “humility” and “grip” at Downing Street when withdrawing his confidence from Mr Johnson. Mr Javid announced his resignation on Twitter at 6.02pm, while Mr Sunak tweeted his letter at 6.11pm. Advisors to both insisted Tuesday night they were not coordinating their resignations, drawing their conclusions independently and not discussing timetables with each other. Just a few hours earlier, both had been seated at the cabinet table when Mr. Johnson addressed them with the cameras rolling. The Telegraph can reveal that both Mr Sunak, who sat next to the Prime Minister at the cabinet meeting, and Mr Javid had already discussed the resignation with close associates. On Monday morning, Mr. Sunak made it clear to his inner circle that he intends to step down. The departures come after a day in which Downing Street's stance on what Mr Johnson had known about disgraced MP Chris Pincher and allegations of sexual impropriety dissolved. Number 10 had said the Prime Minister had never been briefed on previous allegations against Mr Pincher, but Lord McDonald, a former top Foreign Office official, went public on Tuesday morning to insist Mr Johnson had been briefed on an allegation . There was no indication on Tuesday night from Mr Johnson or his closest allies that he intended to step down as a quick cabinet reshuffle was carried out in the hours after Mr Sunak and Mr Javid resigned. Mr Sunak and Mr Johnson have been at odds over economic policy for months, with both keen on cutting taxes but having different views on how to achieve that. The former Chancellor's press team declined to respond to Mr Johnson's taunts about tax cuts. Both Mr Sunak and Mr Javid remained silent in the hours following their resignation letters. The resignations fueled hopes from Tory rebels that they could oust Mr Johnson immediately, with one publicly pledging a fresh push to change the rules of leadership to allow for another vote of confidence. The Prime Minister is currently protected for the better part of a year after winning a vote of confidence last month, but the 1922 Tory Backbenchers Committee has the power to change those rules. Mr. Sunak wrote in his resignation letter: “Resigning from the ministerial post is a serious matter at any time. Resigning as Chancellor while the world is suffering from the economic consequences of the pandemic, the war in Ukraine and other serious challenges is a decision that I did not take lightly. “However, the public rightly expects proper, competent and reputable governance. I realize this may be my last ministerial post, but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and that's why I'm resigning.” He also made it clear that the couple had disagreements over how tax cuts were implemented and economic growth can be secured, with forecasts indicating that a recession is imminent. "We both want a low-tax, high-growth economy and world-class public services, but this can only be delivered responsibly if we are willing to work hard, make sacrifices, and make tough choices," he wrote. “I firmly believe that the public is ready to hear this truth. Our employees know that if something is too good to be true, it isn't. "In preparation for our planned joint speech on the economy next week, it has become clear to me that our approaches are fundamentally too different. I am sad to be leaving the Government but I have reluctantly come to the conclusion that we cannot continue like this." In his reply to Mr Sunak, the Prime Minister listed their achievements during the Covid pandemic, adding: "By all you have not shied away from the tough decisions needed to repair our public finances while protecting public services and spurring economic growth.” He said he would “miss” working with him in government. In his letter of resignation, Mr Javid wrote: "I am an instinctive team player, but the British people are also right to expect integrity from their government. Last month's vote of confidence showed that a large number of our colleagues agreed. It was a moment of humility, grip and realignment. "I regret to say that I am aware that this situation will not change under your leadership - and you have therefore lost my confidence as well." Just before the letters fell, Mr Johnson had conducted a short television interview in which he apologized for making Mr Pincher deputy chief whips to stem the damage from Downing Street's handling of the row. Mr Pincher resigned from his post last week after he was accused of drunkenly groping two men. After Mr Javid and Mr Sunak, four parliamentary private secretaries also resigned. Jonathan Gullis, previously seen as one of the most loyal MPs in 2019, said he was stepping down from government "with a heavy heart". "I've been a member of the Conservative Party my entire adult life, a party that I believe represents opportunity for all," he said. "I feel like for too long we have been more focused on dealing with our reputational damage than working for the people of this country and creating opportunity for all, which is why I went into politics." Saqib Bhatti, Parliamentarian Private secretary to Mr Javid, said: "I believe that standards in public life are of the utmost importance and the events of the last few months have undermined public confidence in all of us. Nicola Richards, a parliamentary private secretary at the Department for Transport, criticized "poor judgement, which I do not wish to be associated with", while Virginia Crosbie, a parliamentary private secretary at the Welsh office, said Mr Johnson's position was "unsustainable". . Alex Chalk, the solicitor general, resigned as the government's third minister on Tuesday. In a letter of resignation, he said: "The prime minister needs an attorney general who can defend the course and culture that is under his oversight. But several supporters of the prime minister's cabinet rallied around him after the resignations. Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Brexit Secretary of State for Opportunities, said he believed Mr Johnson would stay in office longer than Sir Robert Walpole, who served 21 years. Asked on Sky News if Mr Johnson was a man of integrity and integrity, Mr Rees-Mogg said: "Yes. He won the vote of confidence and if there's another vote of confidence we'll see what happens.

Read

Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resign, jeopardizing Boris Johnson's leadership

Key moments Asked if he will quit, Johnson says "F*** that" Nadhim Zahawi, who was promoted to chancellor, Steve Barclay, PM's chief of staff, replaces Javid Starmer (Author: Gardener)

Rishi SunakBoris Johnson's PM is on the brink of collapse after Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid attacked the PM and resigned from Cabinet. The chancellor and health minister resigned within ten minutes in what appeared to be a coordinated move that dealt a potentially fatal blow to the prime minister. Both attacked Johnson's integrity, with Sunak saying he resigned because high standards in politics "are worth fighting for" and that "we cannot go on like this". Javid said the British people have the right "to expect integrity from their government" and that the Conservative Party is "greater than any single person". • Who will replace Boris Johnson and be the next Prime Minister? Johnson's opponents said they would push for a second confidence vote for the prime minister before the summer recess if he doesn't agree to step down first. However, Johnson told his allies last night that he was determined to keep fighting. When asked by an aide if he was going after the departures of Sunak and Javid, he replied: "Fuck it." After an extraordinary power struggle over Sunak's successor as chancellor, Nadhim Zahawi, the education minister, has landed the role. There were claims he threatened to resign if he was not promoted, although this has been denied by allies. Liz Truss, the Secretary of State, was closely associated with the job. Zahawi was replaced by Michelle Donelan, the university minister. Prime Minister's Chief of Staff Steve Barclay has been promoted to Health Secretary. Read Sunak and Javid's full statements and follow live updates below. Finally, and (Tories must hope) in time, the PM's cabinet mates have found a backbone where their wishbones have been. Where I'm from right now, people who don't even know each other have been hugging or high-fiving in front of the pub. But don't assume Boris Johnson will leave before he's shoved. He will know that his group is likely to speed up the process to present a second vote of confidence in their leader; he will know that in such a vote he would probably lose. The queen can die. Johnson will know the lyrics from the Evita hit: "You'll get by, you always have before" - and in fact he always has. Downing Street could tell us that the Prime Minister was "focused" on the recent crisis and that talk of leadership challenges was unpatriotic. It seemed awful to see the great animal lying there, powerless to move and yet powerless to die.” Steve Barclay is Johnson's third health secretary last year. Johnson's chief of staff has become one of the prime minister's most trusted lieutenants and has been entrusted with a series of increasingly tricky tasks. After serving as junior health secretary in 2018, he was known for his relentless focus on efficiency, which is likely to be a key priority as he anticipates huge public health backlogs. As Minister of Health, he is to focus on waiting lists for routine care. There are 6.5 million people on the waiting list in England and Sajid Javid, Barclay's predecessor, admitted the number was likely to continue to rise over the next two years. Hospitals are struggling to resume pre-pandemic activity levels and there are doubts they will meet the goal of eliminating two-year waits for treatment by the end of the month. Unions are likely to vote on strikes in the coming months demanding a "restoration of wages" representing a hike of up to 30 percent. Given the vacancies, the healthcare sector can hardly afford to lose staff. Johnson keeps fighting but he will fight to rule When an ally asked Boris Johnson tonight if he would quit, his reply was emphatic: 'F*** that'. The prime minister told aides that it was "business as usual" and that he was determined to keep fighting. Although there is a widespread view within the Tory party that Johnson can't recover, that doesn't mean he won't try. Unless the Prime Minister can be persuaded to change his mind, or the Committee of 1922 to change its rules, the country faces a time when governance will take a distant second to an increasingly desperate struggle for survival . Even ministers loyal to Johnson are in private despair as the prime minister's already damaged authority over his party appears to be crumbling. With a procession of resignations from government and new MPs coming forward with calls for the PM's resignation, the question is whether Johnson can no longer wield the parliamentary authority he needs to govern. The Chris Pincher affair has already shown how his Downing Street company struggles to keep the government agenda from being drowned out by a series of missteps and unintentional mistakes. As determined as he may be to persevere, Johnson may now find that he simply is unable to get his MPs to do his bidding. History suggests that the resignation of two senior ministers with personal attacks on the prime minister is fatal. Johnson should know this better than most: his resignation as Foreign Secretary over Brexit marked the beginning of the end of Theresa May's time at Downing Street. But it was nine agonizing months since resigning alongside other Brexit ministers in 2018 before May finally resigned. If this is the beginning of the end, the final act can take days or months. Johnson's situation is in some ways more serious than May's because criticism of outgoing ministers focuses on his personal integrity rather than his policies. But he has made it absolutely clear that he must be evicted from Downing Street. Sir Keir Starmer has called for a general election as Labor seek to capitalize on the disorder at Downing Street. The Labor leader said the government was collapsing and an election had to be called within weeks. He said Johnson was unfit to become prime minister and was critical of Sunak and Javid. "Today's resignation means nothing against their complicity for all those months that they should see him for what he was, they knew who he was," he said. When asked if he would support general elections in just a few weeks, Starmer said, "Yes. We need a fresh start for Britain. We need a change of government.” This government is collapsing and members of the Tory cabinet have backed Boris Johnson.” Labor has enjoyed a consistent lead in the polls for the past six months, winning the recent Red Wall by-election in Wakefield. However, Starmer's own personal approval ratings suggest voters are yet to become friends with him, two years after he replaced Jeremy Corbyn. Overall, 54 percent of voters believe he is doing poorly as Labor leader, compared to just 29 percent who think he is doing well, according to YouGov. Starmer has staked his leadership on the outcome of an inquiry by Durham Police into whether he broke lockdown rules. The Labor leader has vowed to resign if he is fined for attending the beer and curry night during his election campaign last year. Rebel Conservatives expect Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 backbench committee, to tell Johnson his time as Prime Minister is up. Johnson's opponents insist there is now a majority of Conservative MPs who want a new leader. A number of senior Conservatives have urged Johnson to quit before he is ousted, including Lord Frost, the man who brokered the Government's Brexit deal, who said there was "no chance" that the Prime Minister would make the necessary Changes can be made to continue No. 10. Just a month ago, the prime minister won a vote of confidence from his group and received the support of 59 percent of his MPs. But his goodwill in the party has continued to corrode ever since, particularly in recent days amid the unruly fallout from the Chris Pincher affair. Several Conservative MPs who voted for the Prime Minister in that vote of confidence publicly said last night that they have now changed their minds. The rebels said it was the job of Brady, the chairman of the 1922 Conservative backbenchers' committee, to tell Johnson he had to resign. Conservative MPs publicly stated they had sent fresh letters of no confidence to the Prime Minister and urged Brady to change the rules to allow another PM vote. Anthony Browne, MP for South Cambridgeshire, tweeted the letter he sent to Brady last night, saying the rules needed to be changed as the current situation was "completely unsustainable". He wrote: "I am writing to you for the second time in a month to confirm that I have lost confidence in the Prime Minister and believe that unless he resigns he must be impeached." A senior rebel told The Times: “The prime minister simply no longer has a majority in the party. Under the committee's rules, Johnson cannot submit another vote of confidence until next June, but that can be changed by a simple majority of the 18-member executive of the panel. Rebels are running for executive branch election this month, hoping to force a rule change and another vote of confidence within weeks. Sunak, once seen as Johnson's heir apparent, has lost his status with Tory MPs in recent months after raising the tax burden to its highest level since the 1950s. He also scrambled to answer questions about his wife's tax affairs after it was revealed she was claiming Non-Dom status. However, he may have improved his chances by exiting the cabinet before most of his peers. In his resignation letter, the Chancellor sought to reiterate his commitment to tax cuts in a message carefully tailored to appeal to Tory members and MPs. Ben Wallace 7/1 The defense secretary is a longtime ally of the prime minister and was quick to declare his support for Johnson. His stock has risen dramatically thanks to his handling of the war in Ukraine and is the most popular cabinet minister with Conservative members; He came out on top in a poll this week asking activists who the party's next leader should be. Jeremy Hunt has made several hints that he will direct. Jeremy Hunt is popular with One Nation MPs and has a close network of supporters who are likely to help him line up another leadership bid. However, his limited appeal for Tory membership was shown when he lost to Johnson in 2019, taking 34 per cent of the vote in a two-horse race. He was beaten in a leadership race by eight other candidates in a ConHome poll on potential runoffs. The Foreign Secretary has consistently topped the rankings of the most popular cabinet ministers among Tory citizens. She declared her allegiance to Johnson tonight, but many expect her to run when he goes. Truss has tried to brush up on her conservative credentials by championing free trade and tax cuts. The education secretary is well liked and has yet to declare his support for Johnson. Allies expect him to seek prime minister and he refused to rule out a candidacy three times in the last month in an interview. He was Johnson's vaccines secretary - overseeing one of the key policy achievements of that administration - and was promoted to the Department of Education. A former German chancellor and interior minister, he has long harbored leadership ambitions, but finished the 2019 race in a disappointing fourth place. He was health secretary for just a year but is one of the most trusted figures on the Conservative benches. He was the first cabinet minister to resign, which may have given him a head start. Penny Mordaunt is one of the most prominent candidates outside of Johnson's cabinet. She is yet to step down from her position at the Department for International Trade but signaled her ambitions by publishing a book setting out her vision for a post-pandemic Britain. The chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee has never held a ministerial post and his lack of experience can be used against him. But he is popular with the party's One Nation wing and if Hunt is struggling to find support, some MPs may be tempted to switch allegiance to Tugendhat. Rishi Sunak has resigned from Treasury on the eve of a big day: Tomorrow the threshold for paying Social Security will rise to £12,570. He was also set to join Johnson next week in devising a new cost-of-living plan. Johnson warned five times about Pincher Johnson apologized today for keeping Chris Pincher in government, as The Times was told the Prime Minister had been warned five times about his conduct. In a television interview, Johnson said he should have fired Pincher when he learned of the allegations against him when he was Secretary of State in 2019. Instead, he appointed him to two more government posts. Johnson said he wanted to "apologize to everyone who has been severely affected". He added: "I want to be absolutely clear that there is no place in this administration for anyone who is predatory or who abuses their position of power." But The Times understands Johnson has been warned on five separate occasions of allegations against Pincher, which are outlined here. The first came when he became prime minister in 2019 and Pincher was touted as a potential Tory chief whip. Johnson is said to have quipped, "Pinch by name and pinch by nature." The second warning came in late 2019 after foreign officials complained about Pincher's behavior. This was raised with Simon McDonald, the Permanent Secretary, and sparked an investigation by Helen MacNamara, the Cabinet Office's Ethics Czar. She informed Johnson that the inquest was taking place and later that it was completed without clearing Pincher. Government sources told The Times that the issue was raised again with Johnson when he reshuffled his government in 2020. "In the run-up to the reshuffle, concerns were raised about Chris' conduct at the Foreign Office," a source said. “It was about overtime and a drinking culture with the minister. Pincher's conduct was addressed again in a reshuffle earlier this year when he was appointed deputy chief whip. His appointment had been delayed while the Cabinet Office's ethics team was asked to investigate. Welcome to tonight's live coverage of politics as Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resign from Boris Johnson's cabinet. Sajid Javid and Rishi Sunak attended a cabinet meeting with the Prime Minister this morning

Read

Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resign; Nadhim Zahawi becomes Chancellor – UK politics live

The education secretary replaces Sunak with Steve Barclay, who becomes the new health secretary (Author: Gardener)

Rishi SunakThe education secretary replaces Sunak with Steve Barclay, who becomes the new health secretary. Nadhim Zahawi has been announced as the new Chancellor, replacing Rishi Sunak who resigned tonight. Rt Hon Nadhim Zahawi MP @NadhimZahawi appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer @HMTreasury pic.twitter.com/0PSifvQ7LB - UK Prime Minister (@10DowningStreet) 5th July 2022 A quick poll by YouGov tonight found 69% of Brits say Boris Johnson should resign. The proportion saying Johnson should step down tonight includes a majority (54%) of 2019 Conservative voters. Overall, among Brits just 18% say Johnson should stay in his role, which is a third (33%) of conservative voters in 2019. Michelle Donelan, the universities secretary, has been appointed as the new education secretary, Downing Street has said. She succeeds Nadhim Zahawi, who is to become the new chancellor after Rishi Sunak's resignation. David Warburton, the MP for Somerton and Frome, had withdrawn the Conservatives' stick after allegations of sexual harassment and cocaine use surfaced. Imran Ahmad Khan, then Tory MP for Wakefield, was found guilty in 2008 of sexually assaulting a 15-year-old boy. Khan, who maintains his innocence, was expelled from the Conservative Party and resigned, prompting a by-election that Labor Party won in June. Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak were fined for attending the Prime Minister's birthday party at Downing Street in June 2020 as part of an inquiry into alleged parties at the heart of government during the pandemic. Johnson offered a "full apology" as opposition parties described him as the first prime minister to have been found to be breaking the law. Johnson faced a parliamentary inquiry after MPs agreed to expel him over allegations he lied to Parliament about parties at Downing Street during lockdown. An unnamed Conservative MP was arrested on suspicion of rape and sexual assault over a seven-year period. Tory chief whip Chris Heaton-Harris urged the MP to stay away from Parliament but did not suspend the whip. Sue Gray published her full account of lockdown busting parties at No 10 and Whitehall, detailing incidents where officers drank so much they felt sick, sang karaoke, got into arguments and abused security and cleaning staff at a time , when millions of people were across the country, friends and family could not see. The government's anti-corruption czar resigned his post and urged the prime minister to do the same, accusing him of violating the ministerial code. John Penrose, Conservative MP for Weston-super-Mare, said Johnson failed to contact Sue Gray over a report of "very serious criticism" of the leadership at 10 Downing Street. He insisted he had won a "decisive" victory when Tory MPs voted for him 211 to 148, but the scale of the revolt left him wounded. Lord Geidt resigned as ethics adviser a day after telling MPs it was "appropriate" to suggest that the Prime Minister had breached the Ministerial Code by flouting lockdown laws, leading Johnson into a new crisis. Cabinet Secretary Oliver Dowden said he and Tory supporters were "disturbed and disappointed by recent events" and told the Prime Minister that "someone has to take responsibility". Chris Pincher resigned as assistant chief whip after he allegedly assaulted two fellow guests at the Carlton Club the night before. Downing Street said Johnson was not aware of any "specific allegations" about Pincher when he appointed him to the whip office, but it emerged in the days that followed allegations against him dated back in 2019, Boris Johnson said Sajid Javid "sorry" to receive his letter of resignation as health minister. In a short letter, the Prime Minister wrote: “Dear Saj, Thank you for your letter tonight offering your resignation. "You have served this Government and the people of the United Kingdom with distinction." Noting Javid's work on tackling Covid residues and other public health plans, Johnson vowed that "the Government will continue to deliver on them". Virginia Crosbie has announced her resignation as Parliamentary Private Secretary for the Welsh Office. Ynys Mon MP Virginia Crosbie has resigned as PPS in the Wales office. pic.twitter.com/9gEcoSWhdt - Adrian Masters (@adrianmasters84) July 5, 2022 Boris Johnson has appointed his chief of staff Steve Barclay as health secretary following the resignation of Sajid Javid. PM's letter to @RishiSunak on his resignation pic.twitter.com/wHA9ivVCTB - Darren McCaffrey (@darrenmccaffrey) 5 July 2022 Tory MP for Hastings and Rye Sally-Ann Hart, who previously backed Boris Johnson in June's confidence vote , said she is no longer able to support the prime minister. In light of the other revelations that have come to light and the need to protect the integrity of Parliament, on behalf of my Hastings and Rye constituents, I can no longer support Boris Johnson as Conservative Party leader and Prime Minister.— Sally-Ann Hart MP (@SallyAnn1066) July 5, 2022 Education Secretary Nadhim Zahawi was seen entering No 10 Downing Street tonight. Zahawi has yet to show public support for the prime minister. Plaid Cymru Westminster leader Liz Saville Roberts said in a statement: "Boris Johnson's days are numbered. He's being dragged kicking and screaming out of Number 10 as cabinet ministers one by one find a spine. “Wales has never given the Tories a majority in our country. It's time to improve independence." She made no comment as she entered Downing Street. Steve Barclay 'to be appointed new health secretary' Steve Barclay, Boris Johnson's chief of staff, is said to have been appointed health secretary following Sajid Javid's resignation tonight but is awaiting official confirmation. Conservative MP Jo Gideon has reiterated her stance that the PM should resign. It was with a heavy heart that I submitted a letter of no confidence to the 1922 Committee two months ago. I think it should be clear to everyone by now that the prime minister has to go. pic.twitter.com/y8lgRNaCfm - Jo Gideon MP (@jogideon) July 5, 2022 Nicola Richards MP has also resigned as Parliamentary Private Secretary for the Department of Transport. I will always be loyal to my constituents and the Conservative Party. Tonight I made the difficult decision to step down as PPS. pic.twitter.com/XrM8IrzreJ - Nicola Richards MP (@Nicola4WBE) 5 July 2022 Northern Ireland Minister Conor Burns gave his "continued and full support" to Boris Johnson from the floor of the House of Commons. Burns spoke on the mailing box while responding to an adjournment debate on issues relating to the Northern Ireland Assembly and Executive: "When the Prime Minister asked me to act as Minister of State in the Northern Ireland Office last September, I became only Second Minister in the 50- year history of the Northern Ireland Office to serve those who are from Northern Ireland. "And as someone who is a Catholic and a Union supporter from Belfast, I feel passionate about Northern Ireland and its wonderful people. "And tonight I express my continued gratitude to the Prime Minister for this opportunity of service. "And as has often been said in the past, the best way to keep a secret is to say something on the floor of the House of Commons, so tonight I take this opportunity to express my continued and full support for my quite honorable friend, the Prime Minister, as he is helping us to put ourselves in a position to restore the institutions of power-sharing that the people of Northern Ireland so desperately need.” My colleague Jessica Elgot's take on the significance of Jonathan Gullis' resignation: Honestly is Jonathan Guillis' resignation arguably more damning than Sunak - Jessica Elgot (@jessicaelgot) July 5, 2022 Continuing to call for the resignation of the Prime Minister, Conservative MP for North Thanet, Sir Roger Gale told Sky News: 'I've been saying for a few days that I believe that we should not change the rules mid-game and that the 1922 Committee rules should remain as they are. But I fear that this letter from Lord McDonald completely changes that picture. "If the Prime Minister still refuses to leave without the confidence of his party's backbenches, without the confidence of significant members of his cabinet, if that is not enough to convince him that the time has come for him to step down, then he must the 1922 Committee, the backbench, do it for him.” Jonathan Gullis, believed to have been a Johnson loyalist, has relinquished his role as parliamentary private secretary to the Secretary of Northern Ireland. NEW: Jonathan Gullis has resigned from his role as PPS. pic.twitter.com/OcP4LV92R6 - Richard Price - LDR (@journoontheedge) July 5, 2022 Labor and Pensions Secretary Thérèse Coffey is not stepping down from Boris Johnson's cabinet, a source told PA. MP Saqib Bhatti has also announced his resignation as parliamentary private secretary, the second so far after Jonathan Gullis: The Conservative party has always been the party of integrity and honor, but recent events have eroded trust and standards in public life. pic.twitter.com/oHZzPO285o - Saqib Bhatti MP (@bhatti_saqib) July 5, 2022 Bin Afolami MP announced his resignation on TalkTV. He said: "I don't think the Prime Minister no longer has just my support, it has the party and the country. "And for that reason I think he should resign." On his own position he said: "You must resign, I cannot serve under the Prime Minister." BREAKING: Tory Deputy Leader @BimAfolami just got his position live on @TheNewsDesk resigned. pic.twitter.com/ZJaXtvlW3A - The News Desk (@TheNewsDesk) July 5, 2022 Conservative MP Anthony Browne has reiterated his stance that he has "lost" confidence in Johnson. Liberal Democrat leader Ed Davey said: "Boris Johnson must go, his chaos government has failed our country. “Families and pensioners face a livelihood crisis without a chancellor and a health crisis without a health minister. "As these crises have ravaged our country, the Cabinet has spent months trying to save Boris Johnson's skin." Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries has reiterated her "100%!" support for Johnson. I'm not sure if anyone actually doubted that, but I 💯 stand behind @BorisJohnson, the Prime Minister who consistently gets all the big decisions right.— Nadine Dorries (@NadineDorries) July 5, 2022 Alister Jack, the Scottish Secretary, said he opposes Boris Johnson staying at Downing Street. Jack MP said: "I fully support the Prime Minister. I am sorry that good colleagues are resigning, but we have work to do and we are making progress.” Jacob Rees-Mogg has confirmed that he will continue to support Boris Johnson as Prime Minister. The Brexit Opportunities Secretary told Sky News: "The Prime Minister has won a major mandate in a general election, a vote by the British people and that should not be taken away from him because a number of people are stepping down." Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon said, "the whole lazy bunch" in Boris Johnson's government should go. It feels like the end may be near for Johnson — not a moment too soon. It is worth noting that the resigning ministers were only willing to leave if they were lied to - they publicly defended him. And 🏴کیکیہ۠۳ڠڠڠ Needs Independence's Lasting Alternative — Nicola Sturgeon (@NicolaSturgeon) July 5, 2022 More cabinet ministers to resign and Prime Minister "shown the door," according to Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen. Speaking to the PA news agency, the North West Leicestershire MP said: "I think they (Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid) have finally understood where much of the party got to weeks if not months ago, that we just can't can continue . It was a shambles." Asked what he thinks prompted Javid and Sunak to resign, Mr Bridgen said: "The Pincher situation and the PM have been proven to lie again." Whether he thinks Johnson will step down, said the Tory MP, "he'll be shown the door" and claimed other cabinet ministers were resigning. Current status in Cabinet Dominic Raab and Priti Patel are not expected to follow suit and resign Deputy Prime Minister Dominic Raab and Home Secretary Priti Patel are not expected to resign. A source close to Raab told PA he was "loyal" to Johnson, while a Patel ally said "she is staying". Andrew Murrison MP has announced on Twitter that he has resigned as trade envoy. Lord Frost, who resigned from the UK government as Brexit Secretary last year, tweeted his reaction. pic.twitter.com/iPtV6I0fM8 - David Frost (@DavidGHFrost) July 5, 2022 Sir Keir Starmer said "it is clear that this government is now collapsing" and said resigning cabinet ministers were "complimentary" as the Prime Minister was "in His office has fallen from grace". The Labor leader said: "After all the filth, the scandals and the failures, it is clear that this government is now collapsing. Tory Cabinet ministers have known all along who this Prime Minister is They were his cheerleaders throughout this sad saga: - they supported him when he broke the law - they supported him when he repeatedly lied - they supported him when he mocked the sacrifices of the British people "In doing so they were complicit every step of the way as he dishonored his office and failed his country. The Tory party is corrupt and changing a man will not fix that. "Only a real government ng change can give Britain the fresh start it needs.” Johnson says he wanted to give Chris Pincher a chance “to prove he can do better”. Johnson apologized for appointing Chris Pincher to his government. He gave Pincher two ministerial posts before making him Deputy Chief Whip in February. When asked if that was a serious mistake, Johnson replied: Yes, I think it was a mistake and I apologize for that. I just want to be absolutely clear that there is no place in this administration for anyone who is predatory or who abuses their position of power. Johnson did not deny calling the MP "pincher by name, pincher by nature." Johnson said if he had another chance he would have fired Pincher after the inappropriate incident while he was at the State Department. He said: About three years ago, a complaint was filed against Chris Pincher in the Foreign Office. The complaint was resolved, he apologized, it was brought to me. Johnson denied claims that he asked his press office to lie on his behalf about what he knew about the Pincher allegations. When this was presented to him, Johnson replied: No, and let me explain what happened. We're talking about a series of events or a series of appointments over several years. So Chris Pincher came into government as Deputy Chief Whip before I became Prime Minister, he was posted to the Foreign Office. He was then Minister for Housing. And then we reassigned him to be deputy chief whip. As I said, about two and a half years ago I got this complaint. But I wish we - I in particular - had acted on it and he hadn't continued to be governed because then I'm afraid he's continued to behave - as far as we can see, according to the allegations that we have - very, very badly , and I feel sorry for those who have been badly affected. When told that his office said he knew nothing about specific allegations against Pincher when told about the 2019 allegations, Johnson said he forgot he was told about them. I'm afraid I'm concentrating on other things at the moment. But what I am telling you now is my recollection of events. * Johnson said he wanted to give Pincher a second chance. What I wanted was to give Chris Pincher the opportunity, if not when in doubt, to prove he could do better. And I'm afraid he couldn't. * He insisted that people could trust him. When asked if people could trust him, he replied: I'll tell you exactly what happened. Because I'm sick of people saying or trying to say things on my behalf, if I do say so myself.

Read

Boris Johnson is fighting to remain in office after Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resigned

Boris Johnson is struggling to stay in office after Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid resigned - His position as prime minister has also been rocked by a string of junior resignations (Author: Gardener)

Boris JohnsonBoris Johnson was fighting to remain in office after the shock double resignations of Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Health Secretary Sajid Javid. The prime minister was expected to quickly fill vacant cabinet posts as other ministers rallied around him. Steve Barclay will replace Sajid Javid as Health Secretary, Whitehall sources have said. But his position as prime minister was also rocked by a string of other junior resignations. On Tuesday, Mr Sunak and Mr Javid left the cabinet in less than 20 minutes, citing concerns about the prime minister's leadership and the standards of his government. Bim Afolami also resigned as vice leader of the Conservative Party while speaking to TalkTV. As Westminster prepared for the resignation of senior ministers, several Cabinet ministers are said to have remained loyal to Mr Johnson, including Deputy Prime Minister and Justice Secretary Dominic Raab, Home Secretary Priti Patel and Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng. The Standard also assumes Defense Secretary Ben Wallace will not resign. Jacob Rees-Mogg has confirmed he will continue to support Boris Johnson as Prime Minister. The Brexit Opportunities Minister told Sky News: "The Prime Minister has won a major mandate in a general election, a vote by the British people and that should not be taken away from him because a number of people are stepping down." In his resignation letter, Mr Sunak said, "the public has a right to expect government to be properly, competently and honestly run". He added: "I believe these standards are worth fighting for and that is why I am resigning." In a fire letter, Mr Javid said the British people "expect integrity from their government" but voters now believed that Mr Johnson's government was neither competent nor "acting in the national interest". I spoke to the Prime Minister to offer my resignation as Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. pic.twitter.com/d5RBFGPqXp - Sajid Javid (@sajidjavid) July 5, 2022 Mr Johnson faced more resignations as three more MPs left his government following the shock resignations of Mr Sunak and Mr Javid. Jonathan Gullis resigned as Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Foreign Secretary for Northern Ireland, saying the Conservative Party was "more focused on dealing with our reputational damage than doing anything for the people of this country". Conservative MP Saqib Bhatti resigned his role as parliamentary private secretary to the health minister, saying "recent events have undermined trust and standards in public life". MP Nicola Richards resigned, saying: "I will always be loyal to my constituents and to the Conservative Party. Tonight I made the difficult decision to step down as PPS.” The resignations came as Mr Johnson was forced to make a humiliating apology for his handling of the Chris Pincher row after it was revealed he had forgotten about previous allegations of to have been informed of "inappropriate" behavior. Mr Pincher quit as deputy chief whipper last week after alleging he groped two men at a private members' club, but Mr Johnson was informed of allegations against him as early as 2019. The Prime Minister conceded that he should have sacked Mr Pincher when he was informed of the allegations against him when he was Foreign Office Secretary in 2019, but instead Mr Johnson appointed him to other government posts. When asked if that was a mistake, Mr Johnson said: "I think it was a mistake and I apologize for that. The public rightly expects government to be properly, competently and honestly run. My letter to the Prime Minister below. pic.twitter. com/vZ1APB1ik1 - Rishi Sunak (@RishiSunak) July 5, 2022 Mr Sunak said he had "reluctantly come to the decision that we cannot go on like this." In his letter to the Prime Minister, he wrote: "The public is right to expect that the government is doing this properly, competently and seriously. I recognize that this may be my last ministerial job, but I believe these standards are worth fighting for and I am therefore resigning." I recognize that this may be my last ministerial job, but I believe that those standards are worth fighting for and that's why I'm resigning." In his letter to the Prime Minister, Mr Javid told the Prime Minister that "the tone you set as a leader and the values ​​you represent , your colleagues, your party and ultimately the country". He said the Tory party "may not always be popular, but we have been competent at acting in the national interest. He added: "The country needs a strong and principled Conservative party, and the party is bigger than anyone Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer said Mr Johnson's government was now "collapsing". He said: "After all the filth, the scandals and the failures, it is t clear that this government is collapsing now. The Tory Cabinet Ministers have known who this Prime Minister is all along. The British public will not be fooled. "The Tory party is corrupt and one man's change will not fix that. Only real change of government can give Britain the fresh start it needs." In another heavy blow to the PM, the former Brexit minister and close ally of Mr Johnson tweeted Lord Frost expressed his support for Mr Sunak and Mr Javid, saying: "In short, Rishi Sunak and Sajid Javid did the right thing." I am not happy to say this and I was hoping that events would take a different course could have, but I am afraid the developments of the last week show that even the Prime Minister stands no chance of introducing the necessary change in approach to running a government or the establishment of a new political direction... "Accordingly and with sadness I believe in the interests of the country...our newfound self-government and the Conservative Party would be best with a ne Served new leadership and a new Prime Minister." The leader of the Liberal Democrats, Sir Ed Davey, stepped up pressure on Mr Johnson to quit, saying in a statement: "Boris Johnson must go, his government of chaos has failed our country. "

Read