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Andy Murray was beaten by the relentless Wimbledon's John Isner

Despite a valiant fight, the Americans' impenetrable serve proved a force too great to withstand as Murray succumbed to a 6-4, 7-6, 6-7, 6-4 loss on Center Court (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayThe 35-year-old's spirit was as indomitable as ever, rallying from two sets against John Isner as the light faded and the roof closed over Center Court, but the American capitalized on the hostile atmosphere and survived a momentous comeback to end a 6-4 7-6 6-7 6-4 win that lasted almost three and a half hours. But Isner is an old foe, one that Murray had found subduing and defeating in all of their eight previous encounters, a record dating back to 2010. Isner's impenetrable serve will always be best remembered for his marathon 11-hour match here against Nicolas Mahut, but it was hard to remember a time when it was as relentlessly precise as it is now. He gave up just two break points throughout the game and conjured up a remarkable 36 aces that pierced the atmosphere whenever the pressure mounted, but it would be unfair to reduce his efforts to just one dimension. The 37-year-old's volley was exquisite, 81 winners was a testament to his aggression, and whether it was that inspired masterclass or the fine margins Murray has lost through age, another wonder remained. They didn't move convincingly in his first-round win over Jack Duckworth, so there couldn't be much of a surprise when Murray gave up the first set here again. In an ominous foreshadowing of what was to come, Isner's serve tipped to 137 mph in the opening game, drawing gasps of horror from the crowd. An adjustment period was needed even for Murray, whose anticipation can mask flagging reflexes, and the 20th seed took advantage, charging into the net behind fierce returns against Murray's meek serve. While it may feel a little contrived at times, it still electrifies Murray to great effect. He excellently preempted Isner's serve in the following game, deflecting power and camouflaging drop shots that left his 6'7" opponent looking lanky and uncoordinated. But facing two break points, Isner delivered two more aces and his first serve refused to provide another opportunity. By the time the American finished the first set 6-4, he had only missed eight in total. For a long time, it seemed like there was nothing Murray could do to break Isner's rhythm. The 37-year-old got 11 of the next 13 points on his serve, including six aces and two that weren't returned. Murray vented his anger on his box, but this was a mystery players have struggled to solve for over a decade when Isner is in full swing. Murray was under pressure on his own serve but handled it with aplomb, all the more controlled as long rallies ensued, backhand winners shot down the line and slapped the air in approval. But the odds were still slim and he covered his face in horror after missing the next backhand at 15-30 on Isner's serve. With nothing to give, the pair went into the tiebreak but Isner still didn't budge as two booming service winners went 7-4 to take a two-set lead. But at 2-3 in the third, a change in momentum threatened to become a false dawn after Murray held serve with a blistering forehand and called for an encore from center court. The crowd erupted immediately, but whatever fire was started was quickly silenced by another impenetrable service game from Isner. Another tiebreak beckoned and after Isner inexplicably fired a long forehand at the opening point, even the American's metronomic serve couldn't stem the tide. By the time his framed forehand touched the streetcar line, Murray was already leaping through the air, banging his fist at the sky. Isner had to weather that storm early in the fourth, but the American's serve was relentlessly true again, even as Murray managed to make more breaks in each game. It was Isner who earned the crucial break by capitalizing on a terrible lack of focus as Murray netted an easy wannabe-winner backhand. Frustration carried into the next point and another unforced error gave Isner a clear path to victory. The decision to close the roof after Isner consolidated that break to take a 4-2 lead was in question and disrupted the momentum Isner had fought so hard to regain, but his serve saved him again at 0:30 when Murray again gestured three aces despair. This time, try as he might, there wasn't much courage left to put up another definitive stand. Three aces yielded three match points, an ending as coldly emphatic as its beginning.

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Andy Murray will ask how much he can take after the Wimbledon defeat

It was almost as if Andy Murray suddenly realized his time was up. In the holy spot of London that set the stage for his greatest triumphs and… (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayOn the hallowed lawn of London, which has provided the stage for his greatest triumphs and more than a few of his most epic sporting tragedies, the realization that the glory days could be gone forever came midway through the fourth movement of his final epic late-night match at Wimbledon. After finding a way back into a contest that eluded him when he lost the first two sets to old opponent John Isner, Murray's hopes of another epic five-set triumph were dashed in the match that matched his towering American Opponents who opened the door had to step through to seal victory. Murray seemed to have the momentum in the match until he was broken midway through the fourth set and the reaction he served when his forehand netted for the fateful break of serve said it all. Murray pulled his cap low over his face and slowly, agonizingly, walked back to that chair like an athlete wondering how it could have happened. Murray has always respected veteran American Isner and on a grass court the threat he poses with his powerful serve has never been underestimated, but the Scot will also know that in his prime he would never have lost that match. Having started his grass court campaign early on at the LTA's Surbiton Trophy, his run to the final of the Stuttgart Open fueled hope that the former world No. 1 could perform a metal hip miracle in the tournament that has always meant so much to him . Murray may be lost for any reason to feel his dreams of a second and third coming in the sport. With the Wimbledon week two draw seemingly opening up for the unseeded former two-time champion, he knew all the pain he'd been going through in his injury struggles could be rewarded at the tournament that has given him so much . Then, of all people, Isner finally found a way to beat Murray, and he did so in a way far too comfortable to have any doubts as to who the worthy winner was. Time may ease the pain of this match and Murray's earliest Wimbledon exit, and he may well come back and try to brave the odds again at the All England Club next year. Murray's legacy as one of the giants in the ultimate era of our great sport can never be erased, but even this superhuman athlete must now reflect on how much more of it he can take. The article Andy Murray will ask how much he can take after losing Wimbledon, first appeared on Tennis365.com.

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Will he be seeded for the US Open and what schedule will he play to get it?

If not the US Open, then I'll go to the Australian Open next year, where I'm seeded again. Why is seeding important Simply put, it reduces the likelihood that what happened to him at Wimbledon will happen again. (Author: Gardener)

the US OpenAndy Murray suffered his earliest exit at Wimbledon this year when he lost in the second round to an inspired John Isner. "I really want to try to improve my ranking to a level where I'll be put in Slams," he said. "I've talked a lot about this with my team and it's something I want to try and position myself on - putting myself in a position that hopefully comes to the US Open. If not to the US Open, then to the Australian Open next year, where I'll be seeded again. So, can Andy Murray get seeded for the US Open and what's next? Put simply, it reduces the likelihood that what happened to him at Wimbledon will happen again. If Murray had been seeded at Wimbledon, he would not have encountered a player like John Isner in the second round. Last year at the US Open he had a top ten player, Stefanos Tsitsipas, in the first round. Being exposed results in easier draws, and kid draws make it easier to climb the leaderboard. Andy Murray is currently just around 200 points off the world top 32, setting the threshold for seeding at the majors. After Wimbledon, Murray will be sitting at 915 points and only sitting outside the top 50 in the world. Then how can he manage to skip 20 places in the ATP? Rankings and in just a few months 200 points more than those who are currently above him? The good news for Andy Murray here is that he's not really defending many of the points from last year. He only played two tournaments in 2021 between Wimbledon and the US Open and didn't do particularly well in either. Murray lost to Hubert Hurkacz in the round of 32 at the Cincinnati Masters and to Frances Tiafoe in the same round at Winston-Salem. Winston-Salem is the week before the US Open so he'll likely skip that if he can, but he's only defending five points ahead anyway. The bad news is that Murray doesn't have much time to advance into the world rankings. It consists of five tournaments - four in the United States and one in Canada. However, Murray could make it six by starting early and adding the Atlanta Open to his calendar in late July. Looking at what Murray wants to achieve, he probably wants to play four tournaments before the US Open. Winston-Salam wouldn't count towards his rankings in the US Open draw anyway, so expect him to skip them. We can probably expect something like this: In terms of what he needs from these tournaments, it's actually pretty simple. Climbing the leaderboard has always been like this. He will need consistency. For example, if Murray could reach the quarterfinals in Atlanta and Washington and the round of 16 in the two Masters events, he would earn 270 points. That would probably put him around 35 in the world rankings and that would probably be enough to get him a seed after deductions. If Murray could advance to the quarterfinals in just one of the two Masters and show some consistency in the others, it would be all but guaranteed. The same goes for winning in Atlanta or Washington. However, what we have seen this summer, apart from the second round at Wimbledon, is that his tennis is at a better level than it has been in years. His game is still there and it should be good enough to put him in the top 35 or so ahead of the US Open. The Andy Murray News article: Will he be seeded for the US Open and what schedule will he play to get it?

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Andy Murray's hopes are dashed by John Isner, but Cameron Norrie pulls through

Two-time Wimbledon champion Andy Murray joined Emma Raducanu through the exit door after a four-set loss to John Isner. (Author: Gardener)

John IsnerTwo-time Wimbledon champion Andy Murray joined Emma Raducanu through the exit door after a four-set loss to John Isner. Powerful American Isner secured a first career win over the Scot on the ninth try by firing 36 aces in a 6-4 7-6 (7-4) 6-7 (3-7) 6-4 win. The Scot was only able to gain 15 points against Isner's unrelenting first serve. But there was so much more to the 20th seed's victory, with a multitude of clean drop shots and deft touches at the net that left center court stunned. Murray still believes he can still show his best tennis in the Slams and hinted in his press conference that he has no intention of retiring from the game. "I think most players on the tour would tell you that a game like this was won or lost on the basis of a few points here and there. I didn't play well enough tonight because of those points," said the 35-year-old. old. "Like I said, I certainly didn't serve well enough early in the game, which I think is understandable. You see, it's a difficult opponent to play against. As you said, I've obviously had good against in the past played him." He later added: "Physically, I feel good, then we will try to continue playing. "But with the problems I have had with my body in recent years, it is extremely difficult to make long-term predictions about how I will feel Will go in a few weeks, let alone a year." If I'm physically fine, yes, I'll keep playing. Murray's serve also had to fire, but too often in the early stages he threw Isner a look at his second try , and it was a searing return that was too hot for the home favorite as he was broken in game three. It was only the second time in the last 12 years that Isner had broken Murray's serve in 25 tennis sets. The second The set whizzed past, neither player putting a glove on the other, but Isner drew the first blood in the tie-break and when Murray had a single chance to undo the damage, he threw a simple pass into the net. At the S etpoint did Murray well to get a bat on the 136-mile rocket, but the return floated wide and Isner held a 2-0 lead. In the inevitable tie-break in the third set, errors crept in from Isner for the first time, a long forehand and a volley netting that gave Murray the initiative, and the fired former champion jumped wildly as he halved the deficit. He was devastated shortly after, however, when another easy backhand pass smashed into the tie to hand Isner's break point, which he scored with a return that Murray just netted. "I'm definitely not a better tennis player than Andy Murray, maybe I was just a little better than him today," Isner said after the Scot had left the jubilant court, waving. "It was an incredible honor to play him on this court in front of this crowd. "To play as well as I did against one of our greatest players of all time was a huge achievement for me. Cameron Norrie survived a major scare to ensure the British No.1 progressed to the third round after a 6-4, 3-6, 5-7, 6-0, 6-2 win over Juame Munar. The friendly atmosphere between the former doubles partners might have ended if the Spanish right-hander had maintained his level during a thrilling back-and-forth battle on Court One. Norrie ensured he averted further misery for the home players on day three of the championship by returning to triumph shortly after Emma Raducanu's elimination in round two against Carolina Garcia in five sets. Ryan Peniston's impressive summer on British soil is over after losing in straight sets to American Steve Johnson. Peniston reached the quarter-finals in Nottingham, Queen's and Eastbourne but lost in the second round in his first Grand Slam appearance 6-3 6-2 6-4. The 26-year-old from Southend was unable to to reach the level he's shone at for the past few weeks, and the big serve American did it with ease. The crowd-favorite partnership of Jamie Murray and Venus Williams makes headlines in the Wimbledon mixed doubles draw as Kyle Edmund celebrates his long-awaited return to tennis. After Andy Murray and Serena Williams' spectacular run to the third round in 2019, it's their siblings' turn this time. Venus, who is now 42, had said she would not be playing at Wimbledon this year but decided to follow her sister across the Atlantic and will seek a first mixed doubles title at a Grand in 24 years to win a slam. Jamie Murray has won five slam mixed doubles titles, including two at Wimbledon - in 2007 with Jelena Jankovic and in 2017 with Martina Hingis. They will face New Zealand's Michael Venus and Poland's Alicja Rosolska in round one, while former British No. 1 Edmund is home partner Olivia Nicholls against American duo Coco Gauff and Jack Sock. Briton Neal Skupski and American Desirae Krawczyk, the defending champions, are second seeded to Japan's Ena Shibahara and Dutchman Jean-Julien Rojer.

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Andy Murray and Emma Raducanu are both eliminated from Wimbledon after losing in the second round

Two-time champion Murray lost in four sets when he was knocked out by heavy-serving American John Isner, while US Open champion Raducanu was defeated in straight sets by France's Caroline Garcia. (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayBritish tennis's two biggest stars, Andy Murray and Emma Raducanu, are both eliminated from Wimbledon in the second round. Two-time champion Murray lost in four sets when he was knocked out on center court by heavy-hitting American John Isner. It was the first time Murray failed to reach the third round at SW19 as the 6ft 10in US player secured his first career win over him on the ninth try. British fans had suffered a double disappointment in quick succession after Raducanu had previously been eliminated on the same place in women's singles. The 19-year-old US Open champion, whose Wimbledon preparations were severely disrupted by a side strain, was defeated by France's Caroline Garcia, who won in straight sets 6-3, 6-3. But there was better news for British men's no the Spaniard Jaume Munar had taken. 6ft 3 in Murray, currently ranked at No. 52 in the world, had threatened another of his epic late-night comebacks from two sets down when he won a tiebreak in the third set. But this time he wasn't able to tap into that seemingly endless well of reserves as world No. 24 clung to victory. The 35-year-old Scot was only able to gain 15 points against Isner's relentless first serve. But there was so much more to the 20th seed's triumph, with a multitude of clean drop shots and deft touches at the net that left center court stunned. Late in the fourth set, the roof was closed due to poor light, and 37-year-old Isner led 4-2. The Brit's preparations for this year's Wimbledon have not been optimal after suffering a stomach strain two weeks ago. And the former world number one had been racing against time to recover from the injury. One of the reasons it's important to improve your ranking and try to get seeded is to avoid facing top players and dangerous guys like these early in tournaments. After her loss, 10th seeded Raducanu said, "I played tennis for seven hours in one month." Of course it's hard to lose a match, but I think Caroline played a great match. Playing on Center Court again has been a really positive experience for me.” Meanwhile, Britain's Ryan Peniston lost to American Steve Johnson, who went down 6-3, 6-2 in round two, after a great summer on the pitch , 6-4 triumphed. But Harriet Dart won her late game in the first round to become the 10th Briton to advance to the second round - her best start to the championship for home players since 1984. On Thursday, Dart meets eighth-seeded American Jessica Pegula, while the Britain's Katie Boulter meets sixth-seeded Czech Karolina Pliskova on Center Court in her second round match Heather Watson continues her second-round match against China's Qiang Wang with the Brit leading 7-5, 5-4.

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Murray leaves Wimbledon at the earliest

Britain's two-time champion Andy Murray is eliminated in the second round at Wimbledon after a four-set loss to John Isner. (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonTwo-time British champion Andy Murray suffered his earliest Wimbledon elimination when he lost to American John Isner in four sets in the second round. Isner, a 2018 semi-finalist, shot 36 aces on his way to an impressive victory on Center Court. Next up is 20-year-old Italy's tenth-seeded Jannik Sinner. Murray had never failed to reach the third round at SW19 in 13 previous attempts. But he was unable to record a serve break against the steadfast Isner, who executed his trademark game perfectly with big serves to record a memorable win, and just hours after British teenager Emma Raducanu lost to Caroline Garcia on the same space was eliminated. Murray fed on an electrifying atmosphere to stay in the match, punching the cool air when an Isner return dropped wide to close out the third set - the crowd rose to offer further encouragement. The Briton, who is No. 52 in the world, saved a break point to debut but a second chance proved too much as 37-year-old Isner went 3-2 up in the fourth as the light faded at SW19 started. At 4-2, play was stopped to allow the roof to close and after the restart the American served to reverse a 0-30 deficit and one game away from victory. He was forced to serve out the competition and was bound to do so - a love handle that sealed a fitting end to an efficient performance against the home favourites. Murray, whose Wimbledon preparations were interrupted by a stomach injury, had returned to win his opening match against Australian James Duckworth in four sets on Monday. Another comeback was needed against an opponent he had beaten in all eight of their previous encounters, but Isner proved an insurmountable hurdle in her first competition on grass. A superb backhand winner was celebrated by the ecstatic crowd and helped Murray earn the first of two break point opportunities in the following game, but a series of smashing serves ensured Isner escaped unharmed. Three comfortable service games, two of them without a point deduction, enabled the world number 24 to secure the first set relatively easily. In a tight second set, Murray took a moment to calm himself with his head in his hands after missing a backhand down the line that would have given him a break point if he was 4-3 up. But with neither player faltering on serve, a tiebreak ensued to determine the extent of Murray's surrender. If he wanted to continue at SW19 he would have to come back after straight sets for the 11th time in his career. Murray had to serve twice to stay in the tournament as he trailed 5-4, 6-5. And while that went its way, it ultimately wasn't to be for Murray and his staunch supporters when his 14th Wimbledon challenge came to an untimely end. Isner was magnanimous towards his defeated opponent in his on-court interview, saying: "I'm definitely not a better tennis player than Andy Murray, I might have been just a little bit better than him today." It was an incredible honor to play may him in this square in front of this crowd. "To play as well as I did against one of our greatest players of all time was a huge achievement for me. Murray has to give everything now. What will he do - pick and play every few months? He wants to get back to a point where he's seeded in a tournament, where he's in a position where he feels like he's one of the big boys again. It must be incredibly difficult what he's been through for the last four or five years. He's also Murray, an all-time star, Isner has shown he was up to the occasion.

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Kim Murray can't hide her feelings as Andy crashes out of Wimbledon

Mother-of-four Kim went through a series of emotions as she watched husband Andy take on American John Isner in the second round at Wimbledon, losing in four sets. (Author: Gardener)

AndyIt was a difficult day for British tennis fans as they watched two-time Wimbledon champion Andy Murray fall in round two - his earliest exit from the tournament ever - but nobody found it more stressful to watch than his long-suffering wife Kim. The 34-year-old, his childhood sweetheart and wife of seven, has regularly followed the ups and downs of Sir Andy's career, often attracting attention with her passionate gestures while cheering him on from the players' box. And last night was no different as Mrs Murray donned a statement pink shirt with a pair of jeans and stylish sunglasses to sit on court at the tennis competition in London. Husband Andy was seen losing his composure as he struggled to deal with American John Isner's huge serve and he was eliminated from the tournament, losing 4-6, 6-7, 7-6 , 4:6. Kim, whose facial expressions have been beloved by fans over the years, looked visibly distressed as Andy went down two sentences before snapping one back, sparking a fuss from his wife, with whom he was seven. But it was short-lived as he was broken in the fourth and defeated by Isner, resulting in the tournament's earliest passing of his career. Kim, who has often been singled out for her different facial expressions during Murray's games, was clearly discouraged by her husband's struggles on the pitch. Despite the point tally, Murray cost Murray just a few rounds out of the match, with two of the four sets going into the tiebreak, causing agonizing viewing for fans and Kim alike. The former world number one remains convinced he can still compete in the Grand Slams despite the earliest Wimbledon exit of his career, but admitted he can't give any guarantees. The two-time Wimbledon champion said: "Has today's game changed my mind? "I think most players on the tour would tell you that a game like that was won or lost on the basis of a few points here and there. I didn't play well enough on those points tonight. See, it's a tough opponent to play against. "Today's game, I don't see why it should really change that view." Murray, who made his Wimbledon debut in 2005, is aiming to return to the scene of his greatest triumphs next year. But he added: "It depends on how physically I am. If I feel good physically, we'll try to continue playing. "But with the issues I've had with my body over the past few years, it's extremely difficult to make long-term predictions about how I'll be doing in a few weeks, let alone a year. "If I'm in a good place physically, yes, I'll keep playing. Ahead of the tournament, Murray opened up about how supportive he's been to Kim through his injury struggles and when he's hit rock bottom ahead of his career-saving hip surgery. In an interview with The Times, the two-time champion spoke of the unwavering support of his family - particularly his wife Kim - when he was "left in a bad place" due to injuries. Andy added of his wife: "I've done everything I can to make it better and it hasn't improved. Kim has been a huge support to me in my tough moments.' Speaking at Wimbledon yesterday, Kim showed her support for Dame Deborah James by wearing one of the colon cancer campaigner's 'Rebellious Hope' t-shirts to the event. She wore a white version of the top recently launched by retailer In The Style in collaboration with Dame Deborah, who sadly lost her five-year battle with colon cancer yesterday. Mum-of-four Kim kept it casual, pairing her white t-shirt from Dame Deborah's collection with jeans. Andy and Kim, who have been together since 2005, have been married for seven years since their wedding in Dunblane in April 2015.

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Andy Murray was beaten by the relentless Wimbledon's John Isner

Andy Murray is beaten by Wimbledon's John Isner - Despite a brave holding performance, the American's impenetrable serve proved too big to withstand as Murray suffered a 6-4, 7-6, 6-7, 6-4 loss lost to Center Court (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayThe 35-year-old's spirit was as indomitable as ever, rallying from two sets against John Isner as the light faded and the roof closed over Center Court, but the American capitalized on the hostile atmosphere and survived a momentous comeback to end a 6-4 7-6 6-7 6-4 win that lasted almost three and a half hours. But Isner is an old foe, one that Murray had found subduing and defeating in all of their eight previous encounters, a record dating back to 2010. Isner's impenetrable serve will always be best remembered for his marathon 11-hour match here against Nicolas Mahut, but it was hard to remember a time when it was as relentlessly precise as it is now. He gave up just two break points throughout the game and conjured up a remarkable 36 aces that pierced the atmosphere whenever the pressure mounted, but it would be unfair to reduce his efforts to just one dimension. The 37-year-old's volley was exquisite, 81 winners was a testament to his aggression, and whether it was that inspired masterclass or the fine margins Murray has lost through age, another wonder remained. They didn't move convincingly in his first-round win over Jack Duckworth, so there couldn't be much of a surprise when Murray gave up the first set here again. In an ominous foreshadowing of what was to come, Isner's serve tipped to 137 mph in the opening game, drawing gasps of horror from the crowd. An adjustment period was needed even for Murray, whose anticipation can mask flagging reflexes, and the 20th seed took advantage, charging into the net behind fierce returns against Murray's meek serve. He broke at the first opportunity, setting Murray into a familiar, self-flagellation rhythm from behind the baseline, slapping his thigh and staring at his box as if ready to disown it. While it may feel a little contrived at times, it still electrifies Murray to great effect. He served Isner brilliantly in the following game, deflecting power and camouflaging drop shots that left his 6'7" opponent looking lanky and uncoordinated. But facing two break points, Isner delivered two more aces and his first serve refused to provide another opportunity. By the time the American finished the first set 6-4, he had only missed eight in total. For a long time, it seemed like there was nothing Murray could do to break Isner's rhythm. The 37-year-old got 11 of the next 13 points on his serve, including six aces and two that weren't returned. Murray vented his anger on his box, but this was a mystery players have struggled to solve for over a decade when Isner is in full swing. Murray was under pressure on his own serve but handled it with aplomb, all the more controlled as long rallies ensued, backhand winners shot down the line and slapped the air in approval. But the odds were still slim and he covered his face in horror after missing the next backhand at 15-30 on Isner's serve. With nothing to give, the pair went into the tiebreak but Isner still didn't budge as two booming service winners went 7-4 to take a two-set lead. Andy Murray reacts to a point loss (PA Wire) But at 2-3 in the third, a change in momentum threatened to become a false dawn after Murray held the serve with a blistering forehand and called for an encore from center court. The crowd erupted immediately, but whatever fire was started was quickly silenced by another impenetrable service game from Isner. Another tiebreak beckoned and after Isner inexplicably fired a long forehand at the opening point, even the American's metronomic serve couldn't stem the tide. By the time his framed forehand touched the streetcar line, Murray was already leaping through the air, banging his fist at the sky. Isner had to weather that storm early in the fourth, but the American's serve was relentlessly true again, even as Murray managed to make more breaks in each game. It was Isner who earned the crucial break by capitalizing on a terrible lack of focus as Murray netted an easy wannabe-winner backhand. Frustration carried into the next point and another unforced error gave Isner a clear path to victory. The decision to close the roof after Isner consolidated that break to take a 4-2 lead was in question and disrupted the momentum Isner had fought so hard to regain, but his serve saved him again at 0:30 when Murray again gestured three aces despair. This time, try as he might, there wasn't much courage left to put up another definitive stand. Three aces yielded three match points, an ending as coldly emphatic as its beginning.

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Andy Murray's hopes are dashed by John Isner, but Cameron Norrie pulls through

Two-time Wimbledon champion Andy Murray joined Emma Raducanu through the exit door after a four-set loss to John Isner. (Author: Gardener)

John IsnerTwo-time Wimbledon champion Andy Murray joined Emma Raducanu through the exit door after a four-set loss to John Isner. Powerful American Isner secured a first career win over the Scot on the ninth try by firing 36 aces in a 6-4 7-6 (7-4) 6-7 (3-7) 6-4 win. The Scot was only able to gain 15 points against Isner's unrelenting first serve. But there was so much more to the 20th seed's victory, with a multitude of clean drop shots and deft touches at the net that left center court stunned. Murray still believes he can still show his best tennis in the Slams and hinted in his press conference that he has no intention of retiring from the game. "I think most players on the tour would tell you that a game like this was won or lost on the basis of a few points here and there. I didn't play well enough tonight because of those points," said the 35-year-old. old. "Like I said, I certainly didn't serve well enough early in the game, which I think is understandable. You see, it's a difficult opponent to play against. As you said, I've obviously had good against in the past played him." He later added: "Physically, I feel good, then we will try to continue playing. "But with the problems I have had with my body in recent years, it is extremely difficult to make long-term predictions about how I will feel Will go in a few weeks, let alone a year." If I'm physically fine, yes, I'll keep playing. Murray's serve also had to fire, but too often in the early stages he threw Isner a look at his second try , and it was a searing return that was too hot for the home favorite as he was broken in game three. It was only the second time in the last 12 years that Isner had broken Murray's serve in 25 tennis sets. The second The set whizzed past, neither player putting a glove on the other, but Isner drew the first blood in the tie-break and when Murray had a single chance to undo the damage, he threw a simple pass into the net. At the S etpoint did Murray well to get a bat on the 136-mile rocket, but the return floated wide and Isner held a 2-0 lead. In the inevitable tie-break in the third set, errors crept in from Isner for the first time, a long forehand and a volley netting that gave Murray the initiative, and the fired former champion jumped wildly as he halved the deficit. He was devastated shortly after, however, when another easy backhand pass smashed into the tie to hand Isner's break point, which he scored with a return that Murray just netted. "I'm definitely not a better tennis player than Andy Murray, maybe I was just a little better than him today," Isner said after the Scot had left the jubilant court, waving. "It was an incredible honor to play him on this court in front of this crowd. "To play as well as I did against one of our greatest players of all time was a huge achievement for me. Cameron Norrie survived a major scare to ensure the British No.1 progressed to the third round after a 6-4, 3-6, 5-7, 6-0, 6-2 win over Juame Munar. The friendly atmosphere between the former doubles partners might have ended if the Spanish right-hander had maintained his level during a thrilling back-and-forth battle on Court One. Norrie ensured he averted further misery for the home players on day three of the championship by returning to triumph shortly after Emma Raducanu's elimination in round two against Carolina Garcia in five sets. Ryan Peniston's impressive summer on British soil is over after losing in straight sets to American Steve Johnson. Peniston reached the quarter-finals in Nottingham, Queen's and Eastbourne but lost in the second round in his first Grand Slam appearance 6-3 6-2 6-4. The 26-year-old from Southend was unable to to reach the level he's shone at for the past few weeks, and the big serve American did it with ease. The crowd-favorite partnership of Jamie Murray and Venus Williams makes headlines in the Wimbledon mixed doubles draw as Kyle Edmund celebrates his long-awaited return to tennis. After Andy Murray and Serena Williams' spectacular run to the third round in 2019, it's their siblings' turn this time. Venus, who is now 42, had said she would not be playing at Wimbledon this year but decided to follow her sister across the Atlantic and will seek a first mixed doubles title at a Grand in 24 years to win a slam. Jamie Murray has won five slam mixed doubles titles, including two at Wimbledon - in 2007 with Jelena Jankovic and in 2017 with Martina Hingis. They will face New Zealand's Michael Venus and Poland's Alicja Rosolska in round one, while former British No. 1 Edmund is home partner Olivia Nicholls against American duo Coco Gauff and Jack Sock. Briton Neal Skupski and American Desirae Krawczyk, the defending champions, are second seeded to Japan's Ena Shibahara and Dutchman Jean-Julien Rojer.

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Andy Murray offers non-binding comment on Wimbledon return after John Isner proved too hot to handle

Andy Murray offers non-binding comment on Wimbledon return after John Isner proved too hot to handle (Author: Gardener)

Andy Murray* Watch: The ball boy that should have cost Andy Murray the set point * Murray fails to break his opponent's serve at slams for the third time since 2005 at the England club of his career. Murray ended an eight-game winning streak against hard-hitting American John Isner, who fell after a frustrating night on center court. I love playing Wimbledon, a surface where I feel like I can still compete with the best. Britain's Andy Murray reacts as he speaks to the media in the main interview room - JOE TOTH/AELTC/AFP via Getty Images Every game against Isner comes with a guarantee: there will be few opportunities to break his enormous serve and when they come, then she will be decisive. It's a test Murray knows well and usually passes with flying colors. Against 6ft10in Isner, it was always about fleeting moments. There were only five break points between them throughout the game. Prior to that match, Murray had only failed to break his opponent's serve twice in a Slam event: once against Roger Federer and once against Rafael Nadal. Murray's good run on grass this year, ahead of a stomach injury two weeks ago, was one of the reasons he had such high hopes. He was also arguably the favorite against 20th seeded Isner, against whom he had a 100 percent record going into the match. Murray had never lost more than one set against him, and all but one of the sets he'd ever lost were by tiebreaks. He was always extremely disciplined when dealing with big players. Dropping his second game of service, the first set - and even the match - already felt a little off his hands. He duly lost the first set and then was pulled into a tie break in the second where Isner outplayed him. He had never lost before the third round at Wimbledon as he was far from fully fit even last year. There's a lot of talk about Murray's longevity, but Isner is also making progress. However, the type of game he plays hasn't left the same scars on his body as the Brit's. Sticking to his only available game plan here, Isner continued his routine of smashing through serves, hitting a total of 36 aces and winning 84 percent of the points on his first serve. His average serve speed for the game - 128 mph - beat Murray's fastest. John Isner of the United States of America plays against Andy Murray of Great Britain during their second round match in Men's Singles on Day 3 of the Championships - Shaun Botterill/Getty Images was outstanding throughout. He also took the return very early to keep the pressure on Murray's serve. Barely an hour into the game, a desperate spectator shouted, "John Isner, I'm so bored of you." Holding on to a tiebreak in the third set, he made 100 percent of his returns to finally give himself a chance. Isner spat out a couple of errors and Murray took control with a couple of drop shots to set three set points. Then Murray hit one of his best serves of the game and Isner barely got a racquet. As the ball flew high in the air, Murray began bouncing up and down with childlike abandon. His wild celebrations perhaps distracted the umpire, who overlooked the fact that a ball boy had controversially caught the ball before it was even out of bounds. We went on to a fourth set, the momentum fully within Murray's reach, before the wheels fell off on the 2-2 serve. With Isner at the net, Murray attempted a backhand pass and went wide, earning his opponent a second break point of the game. Murray hit a great backhand pass that Isner had on the turf to save but then hit two shots into the net. After his serve broke again, Murray returned to his seat with his head in his hands. Isner played a clean rest of the set and served it up the first time. The American's muted celebrations belied how much it actually meant to him to break Murray's winning streak. "It's no secret that I'm definitely not a better tennis player than Andy Murray," Isner said afterwards. When asked how he held Murray back, he summed it up with a lopsided smile: "I served." I'm definitely no better tennis player than Andy Murray, I was just a tiny bit better than him today. Murray wants a return from the second serve. No sign of wobbling from Isner, serve after serve. And he wraps up victory at the net with a loving, subtle drop volley. For the second time, Murray misses a crosscourt backhand volley, provoking a gasp as he throws it into the net. But he fights back to 30-15 with spot on first serves, getting the crowd going again, and even more so when he plays a delightful velvety touch drop that stops when he lands over the net and past Isner. There is rarely a good time for a double fault and now neither of them are, but whatever, he forces Isner deep on serve and he hooks his return. Isner nets with his second serve and chips a backhand into the net. A sensational backhand crosscourt pass opens the door to the Love-30 after chasing a volley into the left corner. Isner smokes an ace, his 33rd follo married on the 34th to crush Murray's fingers in the doorway. Murray is annoyed with himself for not expecting another monster down the middle, this time at 136mph, that was impossible to bring back. And then he completes Love-30's comeback with a forehand crosscourt winner. Murray serves to stay in the match. Murray curses himself for making a forehand winner, but then hammers down a serve that Isner can barely match. Another snappy serve in the middle seals the hold at 15. Another ace from Isner gives him a 30-Love lead, but the crowd goes mad when he netted a backhand to sniff Murray at 30-15. Murray's defensive brilliance, rally-to-fault, puts him 40-30. But Isner closes the hold with a volley. It's time for the roof to come up and for them to take a breather. A mistake by Murray when he overchips a drop shot and allows Isner to reach it to force a winner down the line creates another when he hooks a backhand wide, albeit without a majestic return. And then a third trying to overtake Isner with his enormous span at the net. Isner defends two volleys and Murray then tries to hit him on the line but spears it out. Murray saves the break point on his second serve, this time with a perfectly executed backhand pass. When Murray gets a backhand win at the net, he squanders it. And then he hooks his forehand into the net. Isner has the break. Murray shrugs and starts helping on his box after netting a backhand return, but after blowing off steam he fights back to 40-30 by pushing it deep into his deuce court and follows the overhead winner. But then Isner rolls out a second serve at 115 mph that's so skewed that Murray can't hold his return. It may be fleeting, but Murray holds serve far more comfortably than in any previous segment of the game. They'll soon have to take an eight-minute break to close the roof, but I doubt anyone would want to risk breaking Murray's momentum. Isner has his baseball cap on backwards now, Murray's visor is still facing forward. Isner defends a slightly precarious position at 15-30 with an ace in the middle and another very wide that was initially called but knocked over on review. And then he binds the grip with controlled aggression. Murray can win points against serve, but hasn't been able to win enough to win a normal game so far due to Isner's tactics to support his natural ability. Winning that set meant quite a lot to Murray. Britain's Andy Murray celebrates winning the third set in his second round match against USA's John Isner on Day 3 on Center Court - Steven Paston/PA Isner's wild return rather than rebound. Technically it was in until it hit the ground and Isner could have been awarded a let, but the linesman said so too. An overzealous ball boy interferes - BBC Sport Murray has the mini break. Fantastic return but Isner misses a chance to put the forehand down, 1-0. Isner frames the second serve return, 3-0. The monster serve is held by stretch Armstrong Murray, but Isner follows up with a sizzling volley, 3-1. Murray holds 5-2 on his second serve. Isner serves and volleys to score, 5-3. Murray has the double break when Isner hits a backhand volley, 6-3. Murray has three set points but only needs one as Isner shoots his return out of the ordinary at 7-3. Murray's outrageous drop-shot winner from behind the baseline takes him to 40-love and when Isner scores a forehand pass attempt we go into the tiebreak. Only twice in all the Grand Slams he's played in the past 17 years has Murray failed to break serve just twice. Isner was relentless in his power and willingness to attack the return with drops and volleys. Murray puts us in the tie break. Going for leather, Murray invites Isner into the net before passing him to take a 30 love lead. Isner can't get the wide first serve back and Murray finishes the love handle with a whipping forehand. Getting blown off the field Isner barely put on a glove and yet he still believes. Isner is 40-love up when he commits a double fault for the second time. He misses his first serve at 40-15 but rolls just a second faster than Murray's first. Now Murray needs to serve to stay in the Championship. Though Murray holds, the crowd seems a bit discouraged, especially when some gunslingers hit the center mark from below (Murray fires a forehand and a backhand around his ankles) but fails to hit Isner at the net. Back-to-back aces see a hold to love, although there was a fantastic point in that when Isner manipulated Murray from corner to corner and he kept getting it back until he could only get it back by putting up an overhead. Isner falls to the ground as the winner. Murray comes out of jail with a forehand crosscourt flick he had no right to recover from Love-15 to 30-15. Isner then frames a forehand to give Murray two game points. If he can drag Isner into a rally, he still has the shots and side-to-side speed and stamina to dictate the conditions. The competitive honesty and integrity of Murray as he strains every sinew to crack Isner's serves is highly commendable. It doesn't bring him any rewards in Isner's grip at 15, but it's an inspiration. Now Murray's first serve has reached an unprecedented level of reliability and he feels confident enough to give him the full force sink treatment. He's holding on to love. However, he can penetrate Isner's slingshot. Murray digs deep to pull it back to 40-30 from Isner after some biff, bang pow. But whenever he needed the ace tonight, nine times out of ten he made it and will do so again. Two errors by Murray at 40-Love let Isner back in, but Murray regains his poise and hits a serve down the middle, which Isner hooks for a long time. They're trying to get that awful American chant to work: "Let's go, Andy, let's go." It doesn't start. Serving isn't everything for Isner, but it's most of what makes him so impressive. The ability to execute his shots from serves, drops, volleys and forehand drives has been phenomenal so far. He holds to 30 with another ace wrapping it, but the two drop shot winners that precede him are part of the strategy that hurts Murray more than a mere Howitzer serve. Isner has the mini-break right after Murray's second serve. Murray holds by pushing Isner wide and he carts his return into the net, 2-3. Murray hits the pass attempt with a backhand drop, 2-5. And doubles as Isner frames his return. A bullet serve that Murray is only able to return to the net with his backhand 4-6. And he wraps up the set with another crushing serve that Murray can't contain. Isner seals the hold at 15 with an ace. Tie-break time. Isner starts with another drop shot winner. Murray's face is thunderbolt, but from love-15 down he rallies back to 40-15 with a good second serve (only 46 percent of his first serves came in) and two forehand winners. As Isner slices his baseline backhand into the net, Murray holds to 15. Out comes the Murray fist pump as Isner continues a backhand long, but he can't pass Isner at the net when he gets drafted, and the American hits back at a winner Murray's momentum puts him in Isner's half. Isner misses a backhand on the right but then ties it off at 30 with a serve-drop shot strategy. Again, Murray gets the return back, but Isner hits another half-volley winner and the server holds with a monster in the middle. Murray gets his bat on but can't pass him. Brilliant from Murray to hold at 15 and give himself a chance on the set with a break. Isner's aggression on serve and return pays off, but Murray's serve is holding up well. At 15-all, Murray hits a notable crosscourt return winner from Isner's viciously kicking body serve. But then he misses a backhand winning chance and the glimmer starts to pull back. Another second serve bounces over Murray's chest. He keeps it in, but Isner pins the forehand winner and seals the hold with a missile at Murray's feet, which he can't knock back over the net. Isner nets Murray at 15-all and he scrambles to get the ball but slams his attempted forehand pass into the net. A gorgeous double backhand winner completes his comeback from 15-30 and wins the third straight point as he sends him from the middle to kiss the outside line of Isner's courtship. So far this match: build up on BBC One, launch on iPlayer, 50 minutes on Two and now for the 3rd time we have to change channel/device going back to BBC One. More on this annual farce here: Good holding by Murray to 15. It might be the best strategy - stay tuned for now and see if you can tiebreak him. That's neat: Murray and Isner are the 46th pair of male players to face each other in all four Grand Slams (2010 AO, 2011 USO, 2016 RG). Murray leads the H2H 8-0 and had won 22 of the 26 sets to go into this match. But just dropped the first one, 4-6. — The Tennis Podcast (@TennisPodcast) June 29, 2022 Isner holds love in 88 seconds. This is what a really great player has to do to return an Isner serve: Britain's Andy Murray returns the ball to US player John Isner on day three of the 2022 Wimbledon Championships - SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP via Getty Images Murray parries down from Love-30 to seal the grip with consecutive aces, one middle, one wide. He is now changing his grip for the second time and fumbling with his shoelaces. Murray gets returns whenever he can (despite having two aces in play), but Isner plays well on serve because serve dictates where Murray returns and given the American's strength, it's usually high and floating. But he misses an elemental forehand on 40-Love but follows up with his seventh ace of the game. John Isner of the USA returns the ball to Britain's Andy Murray during their singles tennis match on Day 3 - AP Photo/Alastair Grant Andy Murray also lost the first set on Monday, we should remember, and then recovered. He dashes to 40-Love in the first game of the second set, but is deterred when a Herbert from the crowd yells "Out" and doesn't engage in the groundstroke with the same determination as before. Murray gives himself a shot at 15-all with a beautiful lob after an athletic backhand return, but Isner nails the smash and then sends his fifth ace down. He has two set points and converts the first of them when Murray nets a backhand. At 40-Love-Down, Isner plays a nice backhand winner down the line after a rally he dominated by enjoying Murray's second serve, but Murray then seals the hold on his second serve and sends a kicker down the middle, that Isner swings into the net. Isner starts with a serve volley winner, followed by a serve forehand drop winner and a crushing serve crosscourt forehand winner. Three bar dots. The final point takes two shots: big serve and Murray's attempted crosscourt, jaywalking between the tramlines. Hold to love, as Bryan Ferry almost sang. A dangerous moment for Murray at 15-30 is averted when Isner messes up an overhead that he flaps for too long, but he quickly gets to the net to make the debut. He dominated at net but now it's Murray's turn to put him in play and then pull off a winner down the line. And Murray sews up the hold when his top spin causes an error on Isner's backhand and he nets his groundstroke. Isner now gets new balls to hit. Murray scowls at his box after failing to hold Isner's serve at 15 minutes. It's the story of the game, as is usually the case when Isner's calibration is perfect and he hits her deep. The serves are either non-returnable or use volleys for the big yin. A touch of old magic from Murray holding on to love, Isner unable to keep a few serves in order and Murray also rolling out a serve-volley combo that encircled the crowd. Grit, guile, and great defensive play open the door slightly as Murray climbs to 15-30, but Isner defends with a monstrous wide serve that Murray returns but fails to defend the volley. A wonderful backhand pass annihilated Murray's break point, again after he defended serve. At 30-40, Isner shows his all-court cleverness, following an overhead with a deft drop shot to recover to deuce. Murray gets the advantage with another crosscourt pass with his backhand but is defended by Isner with his second ace right down the middle. A second straight ace, this one wide, gives Isner an advantage and he goes wide again on his next serve and Murray's backhand return soars. Murray fires an ace down the midline on Love-15 but then makes a mistake on his backhand and slices it into the net. At 15-30 and on Murray's second serve, Isner smokes the return at Murray's feet and then goes to the net to hack a crosscourt drop that Murray is unable to retrieve as he attempts a two-handed run pass down the line. Two breaking points. Isner's return is fierce and deep, and Murray is out of the game. Isner, wearing the Fila brand made famous by Bjorn Borg, sends his first ace to everyone at 15, but Murray defends well at 30-15 and recoups a few punches until Isner nails a forehand winner. However, at 40-15, Murray makes a false dropshot and Isner closes the hold. Murray gets the first serve again. Murray serves first and the game's opening point is a comfortably long rally. Murray whips the forehand with the old panache until he's only getting his lengths wrong, but immediately makes up for it with a service volley winner on the backhand to make it 15-all. Isner can't legally get a few returns and Murray has two game points, winning the first on his second serve when Isner nets a backhand. The BBC has moved coverage of this game to iPlayer out of respect for Cam Norrie on BBC Two and Sophie Raworth on One. Murray on iPlayer! Welcome to live coverage of Andy Murray's second round match against the human trebuchet and Center Court number 20, John Isner. The two veterans (35 games 37) have never met on grass but have eight games before Murray's last singles title at Wimbledon contested, with the Scot winning all eight and losing just four sets. However, nine of the 24 sets they completed in those eight meetings went into the tiebreaks, so we could be in for another long night and the frequent switching between BBC One and Two, which both those who wish to watch and viewers who can, infuriates Do not endure any exercise that interferes with the normal schedule. Isner, who has hit 13,688 aces on the ATP Tour, including 54 in his first set win and is just 40 away from Ivo Karlovic's career record, says he's always found it difficult to penetrate Murray's defence. He's a lot harder to beat because his anticipation is just amazing," Isner said. But it does my serve very well.” Andy Murray with coach Ivan Lendl during a training session on day two of the 2022 Wimbledon Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club – John Walton/PA Wire Murray, who however came back after winning the first set to beat James Duckworth 4-6 6-3 6-2 6-4 in the first round on Monday is afraid of losing his rhythm against Isner. "You're not necessarily always in control of them [the games]. You can play four or five serve-return games where you don't get an opportunity," Murray said. The match ups were good for me but left him exhausted for his third round match against Denis Shapovalov. The question that remains, considering Murray's glorious rampage against the dying of the light, is how much of himself he lets out in each match. Isner is always a tough test, but the real one can come if he manages to win: can he recover in time?

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