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I didn't know that my mother had been sexually abused

Andy Murray: I didn't know my mother was sexually abused (Author: Gardener)

Andy MurrayAndy Murray: I didn't know my mother was sexually assaulted Andy Murray said he was unaware of his mother's sexual assault and revealed he was "angry and upset" when he heard about the incident. Speaking for the first time about his mother's experience, Murray said his brother was already aware of the attack, but he was not. "My mother texted me at the time to let me know there was an article coming out about it," two-time Wimbledon champion Emma Barnett, 35, told Bloomberg. I was pretty angry but I didn't really know what to say either...obviously I texted my mum, I called her the next day to talk to her and make sure she was okay," he said he. The tennis player said it was "a familiar story for a lot of women," adding: "This type of behavior should not be tolerated anywhere." In the interview ahead of this year's Wimbledon Championships, the former world No. 1 also addressed the decision to ban Russian and Belarusian players from games amid war in Ukraine. He said his sympathy goes "first of all... to the people of Ukraine and what they are going through", although he said he "can understand" that the decision might seem unfair to some players who cannot compete. "Whether or not some tennis players are unable to play at an event and whether ranking points are offered is pretty much irrelevant on the whole," he said. "Obviously I know and am friends with some of the Russian players and I feel for them that they can't compete... I can understand that might seem unfair to them, but I can also see the Wimbledon side and their point of view and the perspective that they have and it's very complex, but in the end there's a war going on.” Murray said earlier this week that he intends to play Wimbledon next week but that he faces a race against time to improve his fitness to prove as his abdominal injury continues to hamper his preparations. Andy Murray hopes to recover from injury in time for Wimbledon - REUTERS Murray responded that it's 'part of the motivation to still be competing' but said he knew it was 'an incredibly difficult thing' will be. Murray also spoke about Blackpool footballer Jake Daniels' decision to come out publicly as gay in May - becoming the first current male professional footballer in the UK - saying it was "really positive" and it shed a light on tennis. In response to a question from Barnett, Murray said, "I think [it] was really positive that he felt comfortable enough to come out and from what I've seen the media coverage has been mostly extremely positive. He added that there has not been a male tennis player who has come out as gay "while still playing," but that a few "have come out post-career." "So maybe we need to ask the question why is that and why are they still not comfortable coming out while they're still active," he said.

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Tim Henman thinks Emma Raducanu can survive the glare of the Wimbledon spotlight

The 19-year-old sparked further fears about her fitness when she pulled out of a training session on Friday. (Author: Gardener)

Tim HenmanTim Henman has shared the wisdom of his experience with Emma Raducanu as she prepares for the glare of the Wimbledon spotlight and has supported the US Open champion to succeed - fitness permitting. The 19-year-old's camp had been cautiously positive about their hopes of being fit for the Championship on Thursday and hadn't allayed fears of a setback, although Raducanu is expected to train on Saturday, where she will also hold a press conference. It's the latest in a string of nagging injuries Raducanu has suffered since her extraordinary triumph in New York as she tries to adapt to the demands of a sport in which she's already a world star. Henman sat on the sidelines during Raducanu's run to the title at Flushing Meadows, attending their post-final celebrations and advising the teenager on how to deal with being the home star at Wimbledon. The former UK number one, who also shares a management company with Raducanu, told the PA news agency: 'A lot of the same people who took care of me look after her so I will always be there to help her and her to answer any questions she has. "But she has a wise head on young shoulders. I just hope she's healthy. We have to be patient, and that's not a very popular word at this time of year. "When you're the center of attention, it's really important that you focus on the things that you can control and that's your preparation and performance. "When you're young and haven't had the experience it's not always easy, but when I think about her mental strength, like she played in those 10 games in New York, mentally she's incredibly strong. But she's 19, she has so many opportunities ahead of her.” While Henman and, after him, Andy Murray, have often been alone in the spotlight, Raducanu at least has company in the form of Murray and fellow cast members Cameron Norrie and Dan Evans, and appearances by Jack, among others Draper, Katie Boulter and Ryan Peniston, on grass, were hugely encouraging. Henman said: "If you've looked at British tennis and the rankings for the last 20, 30, 40 years, I don't think our return on investment has been good enough. “But now I feel like it's really moving in the right direction. We have better players leading the field and that really creates a feel good factor. I think the impact Emma has had on sport in this country is huge and that's because Murray won Wimbledon. "I've been told that we have the best tennis tournament in the world, but nobody is there to compete. I think it was important that I started changing the mentality and thinking around British tennis. Henman now sits on the Wimbledon committee and was privy to the decision-making regarding the bans on Russian and Belarusian players which has dominated the championship build-up. Wimbledon officials have claimed they had no choice after being told by the government players from the two countries could not compete under a neutral flag, as they have done at other tournaments and will do at the US Open . The ATP and WTA retaliated by stripping Wimbledon of ranking points and Henman said: “It was very challenging. “As a UK institution that has worked so closely with the Government every year, but especially last year with the Covid restrictions, that would not happen. “Then go the way and ask the Russians and Belarusians to sign a declaration against the war and against the Putin regime and that will undoubtedly endanger them and their extended families, and then your third option, which is terrible, is not to invite them. It was really, really hard.” As the war in Ukraine seems to see no end, there is a possibility that the ban will be extended in the coming years. Henman said: “This decision only applies to 2022. In addition to his role at the Championships, Henman also found time on Friday to lead HSBC's World of Opportunity programme, which aims to educate young people about career opportunities in sport. He said: "I have always been grateful for the opportunities that have been given to me. If you look at this as an event, it's very easy to think it's a tennis tournament, so the tennis players are the ones who have the only chance, but that's not the case. :: Tim Henman spoke about HSBC's World of Opportunity program.

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Raducanu sparks fears she will NOT be fit for Wimbledon after missing training

EMMA RADUCANU sparked concerns about her fitness after abandoning a high-profile, pre-scheduled training session on the eve of Wimbledon. And former tennis ace Pam Shriver has written off her chances... (Author: Gardener)

WimbledonEMMA RADUCANU sparked concerns about her fitness after abandoning a high-profile, pre-scheduled training session on the eve of Wimbledon. The 19-year-old had to face two-time Slam champion Garbine Muguruza of Spain for 45 minutes this afternoon. A replacement had to be found quickly and a beaming Yuriko Miyazaki - who defected from Japan to Britain that year - seized the opportunity to take on a prestigious showcourt against a high-profile opponent. After a day off on Thursday, she trained at Aorangi Park as expected but this surprise absence only reinforced the belief that she is not yet 100% fit. Kent star Raducanu has been an injury doubt since she put a strain on her side in the first round of the Nottingham Open. Shriver, who has won five Wimbledon women's doubles titles, believes the injury and unsettled coaching situation mean a deep run at Wimbledon is unlikely. The 59-year-old American told Pickswise: "I don't know why getting a coach to help out for this next period was so complicated, but it clearly was. “She's had a lot of injuries, not enough time on the court and there's a lot of pressure at her home slam, the place she didn't return to the court to finish her match 12 months ago. "Putting it all together, I'd be surprised if she made a deep run." Meanwhile, her super agent Max Eisenbud insists the US Open champion is not sidetracked by commercial interests. Raducanu has NINE sponsors on her list - British Airways, Dior, Evian, HSBC, Nike, Porsche, Tiffany jewellery, Vodafone clubs and Wilson - worth tens of millions of pounds. IMG boss Eisenbud told the BBC's Sports Desk podcast: "We could have done 50 days of shooting. “I have never seen so much excitement and companies wanting to do business with Emma after the US Open. "It's been a tough year. She had a lot of bad luck and what really hurt her was having (caught) Covid and not having a great off-season and then she caught up. "But I think if she had zero filming dates, everything would be the same. "But if she locked herself in the room all year and didn't do anything, I think it would be the same. “Emma decided she wanted to start her shoots at 12 or 1pm and go until 8 or 9pm and have the option in the morning to either work out or work out or do some fitness. There are sponsors who have these days, but many of them don't use them. “I would imagine it will take her about 13 days by the end of the year. "But when day 19 comes, it's millions of dollars at stake and you have to say 'no' because you're staying true to the 18 days — that's tough."

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Tim Henman thinks Emma Raducanu can survive the glare of the Wimbledon spotlight

The 19-year-old sparked further fears about her fitness when she pulled out of a training session on Friday. (Author: Gardener)

Tim HenmanTim Henman has shared the wisdom of his experience with Emma Raducanu as she prepares for the glare of the Wimbledon spotlight and has supported the US Open champion to succeed - fitness permitting. The camp of the 19-year-olds had rated their hopes of being fit for the championship on Thursday cautiously positive, but there was no explanation for the change of plans in sight. It's the latest in a string of nagging injuries Raducanu has suffered since her extraordinary triumph in New York as she tries to adapt to the demands of a sport in which she's already a world star. Henman sat on the sidelines during Raducanu's run to the title at Flushing Meadows, attending their post-final celebrations and advising the teenager on how to deal with being the home star at Wimbledon. The former UK number one, who also shares a management company with Raducanu, told the PA news agency: 'A lot of the same people who took care of me look after her so I will always be there to help her and her to answer any questions she has. "But she has a wise head on young shoulders. I just hope she's healthy. We have to be patient, and that's not a very popular word at this time of year. "When you're the center of attention, it's really important that you focus on the things that you can control and that's your preparation and performance. "When you're young and haven't had the experience it's not always easy, but when I think about her mental strength, like she played in those 10 games in New York, mentally she's incredibly strong. But she's 19, she has so many opportunities ahead of her.” While Henman and, after him, Andy Murray, have often been alone in the spotlight, Raducanu at least has company in the form of Murray and fellow cast members Cameron Norrie and Dan Evans, and appearances by Jack, among others Draper, Katie Boulter and Ryan Peniston, on grass, were hugely encouraging. Henman said: "If you've looked at British tennis and the rankings for the last 20, 30, 40 years, I don't think our return on investment has been good enough. “But now I feel like it's really moving in the right direction. We have better players leading the field and that really creates a feel good factor. I think the impact Emma has had on sport in this country is huge and that's because Murray won Wimbledon. "I've been told that we have the best tennis tournament in the world, but nobody is there to compete. I think it was important that I started changing the mentality and thinking around British tennis. Henman now sits on the Wimbledon committee and was privy to the decision-making regarding the bans on Russian and Belarusian players which has dominated the championship build-up. Wimbledon officials have claimed they had no choice after being told by the government players from the two countries could not compete under a neutral flag, as they have done at other tournaments and will do at the US Open . The ATP and WTA retaliated by stripping Wimbledon of ranking points and Henman said: “It was very challenging. “As a UK institution that has worked so closely with the Government every year, but especially last year with the Covid restrictions, that would not happen. “Then go the way and ask the Russians and Belarusians to sign a declaration against the war and against the Putin regime and that will undoubtedly endanger them and their extended families, and then your third option, which is terrible, is not to invite them. It was really, really hard.” As the war in Ukraine seems to see no end, there is a possibility that the ban will be extended in the coming years. Henman said: “This decision only applies to 2022. In addition to his role at the Championships, Henman also found time on Friday to lead HSBC's World of Opportunity programme, which aims to educate young people about career opportunities in sport. He said: "I have always been grateful for the opportunities that have been given to me. If you look at this as an event, it's very easy to think it's a tennis tournament, so the tennis players are the ones who have the only chance, but that's not the case. :: Tim Henman spoke about HSBC's World of Opportunity program.

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Tim Henman thinks Emma Raducanu can survive the glare of the Wimbledon spotlight

The 19-year-old sparked further fears about her fitness when she pulled out of a training session on Friday. (Author: Gardener)

Tim HenmanTim Henman has shared the wisdom of his experience with Emma Raducanu as she prepares for the glare of the Wimbledon spotlight and has supported the US Open champion to succeed - fitness permitting. The camp of the 19-year-olds had rated their hopes of being fit for the championship on Thursday cautiously positive, but there was no explanation for the change of plans in sight. It's the latest in a string of nagging injuries Raducanu has suffered since her extraordinary triumph in New York as she tries to adapt to the demands of a sport in which she's already a world star. Henman sat on the sidelines during Raducanu's run to the title at Flushing Meadows, attending their post-final celebrations and advising the teenager on how to deal with being the home star at Wimbledon. The former UK number one, who also shares a management company with Raducanu, told the PA news agency: 'A lot of the same people who took care of me look after her so I will always be there to help her and her to answer any questions she has. "But she has a wise head on young shoulders. I just hope she's healthy. We have to be patient, and that's not a very popular word at this time of year. We'll have to be patient, and that's not a very popular word at this time of year. "When you're the center of attention, it's really important that you focus on the things that you can control and that's your preparation and performance. "When you're young and haven't had the experience it's not always easy, but when I think about her mental strength, like she played in those 10 games in New York, mentally she's incredibly strong. But she's 19, she has so many opportunities ahead of her.” While Henman and, after him, Andy Murray, have often been alone in the spotlight, Raducanu at least has company in the form of Murray and fellow cast members Cameron Norrie and Dan Evans, and appearances by Jack, among others Draper, Katie Boulter and Ryan Peniston, on grass, were hugely encouraging. Henman said: "If you've looked at British tennis and the rankings for the last 20, 30, 40 years, I don't think our return on investment has been good enough. “But now I feel like it's really moving in the right direction. We have better players leading the field and that really creates a feel good factor. I think the impact Emma has had on sport in this country is huge and that's because Murray won Wimbledon. "I've been told that we have the best tennis tournament in the world, but nobody is there to compete. I think it was important that I started changing the mentality and thinking around British tennis. Henman now sits on the Wimbledon committee and was privy to the decision-making regarding the bans on Russian and Belarusian players which has dominated the championship build-up. Wimbledon officials have claimed they had no choice after being told by the government players from the two countries could not compete under a neutral flag, as they have done at other tournaments and will do at the US Open . The ATP and WTA retaliated by stripping Wimbledon of ranking points and Henman said: “It was very challenging. “As a UK institution that has worked so closely with the Government every year, but especially last year with the Covid restrictions, that would not happen. “Then go the way and ask the Russians and Belarusians to sign a declaration against the war and against the Putin regime and that will undoubtedly endanger them and their extended families, and then your third option, which is terrible, is not to invite them. It was really, really hard.” As the war in Ukraine seems to see no end, there is a possibility that the ban will be extended in the coming years. Henman said: “This decision only applies to 2022. In addition to his role at the Championships, Henman also found time on Friday to lead HSBC's World of Opportunity programme, which aims to educate young people about career opportunities in sport. He said: "I have always been grateful for the opportunities that have been given to me. If you look at this as an event, it's very easy to think it's a tennis tournament, so the tennis players are the ones who have the only chance, but that's not the case. :: Tim Henman spoke about HSBC's World of Opportunity program.

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Raducanu's agent insists that she NOT be distracted by commercial interests

Emma Raducanu's agent has insisted the US Open champion is not distracted from her commercial interests and her performances would be the same without all her sponsorship shoots. (Author: Gardener)

RaducanuEmma Raducanu's agent has insisted she was leaving "millions on the table" due to her limit of 18 sponsorship days a year. Questions have been raised about Raducanu and her commercial commitments as she is now a brand ambassador for nine companies including Nike, HSBC, Evian and Tiffany & Co following her spectacular success at the US Open last year. With that in mind, Raducanu has on the pitch fought since she won her first Grand Slam last year. Her IMG agent Max Eisenbud says her commercial interests are not a distraction from her on-court accomplishments and that if she has over 18 days of sponsorship a year, leaving millions on the table, she has to say no. There are sponsors who have these days, but many of them don't use them. "I would imagine that by the end of the year it would take her about 13 days to do 'the 18 days.' Eisenbud also insisted that her sponsorship days do not affect her on-pitch performances. He said: "If she had zero filming dates, everything would be the same. "But I think if she had zero filming dates, everything would be the same. "I know from the outside that you guys want to look at all these things - but if she locked herself in the room all year and didn't do anything, I think it would be the same." Eisenbud says this is his third professional experience with something "spectacular, special — and not normal." The other two were 17-year-old Maria Sharapova, who defeated Serena Williams in the 2004 Wimbledon final, and Li Na, who was watched by an estimated 116 million Chinese viewers as she won her first Grand Slam title at the 2011 French Open . American agent Eisenbud designed a calendar for Sharapova, crossing out all the weeks before, during and immediately after tournaments when she would not be doing any commercial work. Along with her father, Yuri, they discovered that she had 18 days a year to devote to sponsors without affecting her training or tournament schedule. Eisenbud said, "Same philosophy again," Eisenbud continued. “Emma decided she wanted to start her shoots at 12 or 1pm and go until 8 or 9pm and have the option in the morning to either work out or work out or do some fitness. Raducanu is currently preparing for Wimbledon where she will be in the draw despite her recent troubles with a side pull injury. Raducanu wasn't ready to return for the WTA tournament in Eastbourne but has been training at the All England Club this week.

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Emma Raducanu cancels Wimbledon training but fears over Brit's injury are downplayed

EMMA RADUCANU failed to show up for a pre-Wimbledon training session on Friday afternoon, sparking fears she could pull out of the tournament due to injury. (Author: Gardener)

Emma RaducanuEmma Raducanu failed to show up for a scheduled Wimbledon training session on Friday afternoon, sparking fears of an injury setback. But i Sport have allayed fears that world No. 11 Raducanu will miss her home Grand Slam, insisting Raducanu practiced for an hour in the afternoon, finishing at 2pm before then taking her session with Muguruza cancelled. The news comes just hours after Raducanu learned she will face Alison van Uytvanck, who won two titles on grass this summer, in the first round at Wimbledon next week. The 10th seed hopes to be at full fitness and sharpness against the Belgian, ranked 46th in the world, who will be a dangerous opponent. She recently won a grass 125 event in Italy. WATCH THE FULL SERIES OF WIMBLEDON DRAW HERE Raducanu's team has been enduring her injury day after day and attended the draw hoping the US Open winner will be fit enough to play by her first game. Raducanu has declared her injury "an absolute freak" and has forced the teenager to skip events at Birmingham, Eastbourne and Hurlingham Club ahead of Wimbledon, meaning she has yet to play a single game on grass this season. Two-time SW19 champion Andy Murray had been training with Dan Evans at the No 1 spot just before Raducanu was due to train, the latter having shrugged off an abdominal injury himself to be fit for his favorite event. Much like Murray's struggles in recent years, Raducanu has been plagued by injuries since her maiden Grand Slam triumph in New York in November. Her agent Max Eisenbud admitted to BBC podcast The Sports Desk that the young Brit has had "a tough year" and said: "I think she's had a lot of bad luck and what really hurt her was [Catching] Covid and not having a great off-season and then she caught up. MORE TENNIS NEWS... Rafael Nadal Wimbledon dream shared by breakout star Ryan Peniston Nick Kyrgios has an ideal Wimbledon draw to Destroying Rafael Nadal's hopes a year ago, reaching the fourth round was a relatively unknown pre-tournament. She was forced to retire during her fourth-round match against Ajla Tomljanovic on Center Court due to breathing problems. It's been a tougher time for her since, but a strong run at Wimbledon would go a long way in restoring some rhythm and confidence for the second half of the season.WAYS TO THE FINALS... Nadal's road to Wimbledon glory, as Berrettini might end the calendar slam Djokovic predicts Wimbledon tie: Kwon opening game, Nadal final Raducanu's path to Wimbledon final: Tough first round, Jabeur QF Murray's path to Wimbledon final: Tough opening round, Djokovic

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Your essential guide to Wimbledon 2022, from the Russia issue to Emma Raducanu's return

The tournament returns this Monday with full attendance. From politics to point deductions, Raducanu to wildcards to backs, Matt Majendie has your guide (Author: Gardener)

RussiaOn Monday, the world's most popular tennis championships return to SW19 after two years spoiled by Covid. T minus three days to a fortnight Sue Barker (for the last time), strawberries and - hopefully - some sun on the pitch if you're lucky enough to have tickets to Wimbledon 2022. So could this be Emma's Raducanus moment after her fairytale US Open win last year? The two biggest draws for home fans, Andy Murray and Emma Raducanu were both in a race to prove their fitness for this year's Wimbledon. Two-time champion Murray suffered an abdominal strain in the final of the Stuttgart Open two weekends ago, struggling to serve against last year's Wimbledon runner-up Matteo Berrettini. It's a blow at a time when he's been at his best since hip surgery three and a half years ago. The former world No. 1 is expected to take his place in the draw but just how fit and ready he will be remains to be seen. Wimbledon last year had been her breakthrough tournament as she reached the fourth round before progressing to her fairytale US Open win a few weeks later. She described her side strain as a "freak" injury, but she's been training at Wimbledon this week and hopes to at least get the problem under control by the first round. From a British perspective, fans can look far beyond Murray and Raducanu. Currently ranked 12th in the world, he has won two titles this year but never made it past the third round of a Grand Slam. Ryan Peniston proved an escape at the Cinch Championships at Queen's Club last week, the usual warm-up tournament for Wimbledon. The 26-year-old beat No. 1 seed and French Open runner-up Casper Ruud. Another rising star of the game is Jack Draper, whose father Roger was the former CEO of the Lawn Tennis Association. The left-hander, 20, has the kind of game suited to Wimbledon's turf. Serena Williams had not played on the WTA Tour since suffering an ankle injury in the first round of Wimbledon last year. When her longtime coach Patrick Mouratoglou started working with Simona Halep, it was hinted that Williams would be retiring. But she made her comeback in doubles at Eastbourne with Ons Jabeur on Tuesday and is in the main draw in singles at Wimbledon. She is currently one behind Margaret Court and has reached four Grand Slam finals since the birth of her daughter Olympia without sealing a title. There are question marks about the French Open champion Rafael Nadal, who had to endure injections in Paris to negate the pain. The 22-time Grand Slam champion has avoided further injections for a treatment called radiofrequency ablation, which destroys nerve fibers that carry pain to the brain. The tournament comes too early for his great rival and friend Roger Federer, but the third member of tennis' Big Three, Novak Djokovic, will start as a favourite. With Government guidance in the lengthy preparation, two clear decisions have been made to the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (AELTC). In response to the invasion of Ukraine, they could ban players from Russia and Belarus from playing altogether or force them to sign a declaration against the war. Fearing possible reprisals for those players and their families, Wimbledon said it had no alternative but to continue the ban. The men's and women's tours - the ATP and WTA - responded by removing ranking points from the tournament and all previous UK grass court events. It led to fears that Wimbledon could become little more than an exhibition tournament and there were the likes of Naomi Osaka who questioned her participation. She's among the notable exits, but cited an Achilles injury rather than the Russian dispute for that decision. The ruling means the notable absence of world No. 1 Daniil Medvedev, while the highest-ranking player in women's football to be sidelined is No. 6 Aryna Sabalenka. A Russian player, doubles specialist Natela Dzalamidze, recently changed her nationality to Georgia and will play in the tournament - she says the decision was made before the ban was announced but the move was only approved afterwards. Proposals have been submitted for 39 additional tennis courts at Wimbledon Park Golf Course, one of which is an 8,000-court show court. Opponents have cited agreements between the All England Club and Merton Council that said the land could not be built on when the AELTC bought the golf club property for £5.2million in 1993. Conservation groups also point to the fact that the 240-year-old landscape was designed by Capability Brown on the property of the Spencer family, Princess Diana's ancestors. Up to 300 trees are expected to be felled - although the AELTC plans to plant 1,500 new ones - while the lake is dredged and a new boardwalk built around it as part of a 9.4-acre public park. Known as the Estate Master Plan, Wimbledon has defended its expansion, saying the aim is to maintain its position as the world's premier tennis tournament. Henman Hill, Murray Mound, Racudanu Ridge, or whatever you want to call it, have long been a feature of the Wimbledon fortnight. And day after day, fans who can't make it to the show courts will flock back to watch the action from Center Court and No. 1. This year, a “Henman Hill” is to be built in New York, 3,500 miles away. For the final three days of the promotion - July 8-10 - it will be set up at Brookyln Bridge Park to give 1,000 New Yorkers at once the chance to experience the ultimate Wimbledon experience.

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Zinc's turn to feel the pressure as LME stocks evaporate

Zinc prices are unfazed, LME 3-month metal slipped to a fresh 2022 low of $3,361 per tonne on Friday, in tandem with the broader sell-off across the metals spectrum (Author: Gardener)

LMELONDON - The London Metal Exchange (LME) zinc stocks were searched this week, leaving available stocks on the brink of depletion. Zinc prices are unfazed, LME 3-month metal slipped to a fresh 2022 low of $3,361 per tonne on Friday, in tandem with the broader sell-off across the metals spectrum. But that hides an explosion in time spread tightness, the cash premium over three-month deliveries rose to $218 a ton on Thursday, the highest this century. It's an unwelcome development for the stock market, after having to suspend the nickel contract in March when a similar run on equities caused a price meltdown. The LME has set credit limits for all of its large contracts and allowed delayed delivery. In addition, this zinc squeeze is firmly anchored in the physical supply chain. LME zinc inventories were already low this week at 79,425 tonnes. This leaves the available live tonnage at just 14,975 tonnes, which equates to a few hours' global consumption in a 14 million tonne market. This is an acceleration of a prolonged downtrend in LME zinc stocks. At this time last year there were 258,000 tonnes in LME registered warehouses and a further 85,800 tonnes in off-license storage. These shadow stocks have also largely disappeared, amounting to a meager 3,224 tonnes at the end of April, according to the latest LME report. There is a single batch (25 tons) of zinc in Europe - in the Spanish port of Bilbao - and none at all at U. That tells you where the physical supply chain is tightest. It's going to be a bad year for Zinkhütten. Energy shortages in Europe have already caused Glencore's 100,000 tonne smelter at Portovesme in Italy to be curtailed, while other operators adjusted operating rates around peak energy periods. The region accounts for around 12% of global refined zinc production and the ongoing supply disruption has translated into record physical premiums of up to $500 per tonne to LME cash. The S. market hasn't made the same headlines, but physical buyers are paying even more to get their metal. Fastmarkets estimates the Midwest premium earlier this month at 38-50 cents per pound ($970 per ton at midpoint). Although exacerbated by high freight costs, the high premium is also due to declining regional smelter production. Hudbay Minerals' Flin Flon smelter, one of three Canadian producers of refined metals, will be completely shut down this quarter as the 777 feeder mine closes after 18 years of operation. The plant has been shutting down for some time, with production last year falling to 90,000 tons from 112,000 tons in 2020. The supply loss was exacerbated by lower production from a second Canadian smelter. The Noranda Income Fund has revised down its production forecast for the year by 15,000 tonnes citing "operational challenges" in the first quarter. Supplying the South American smelters also failed. Nexa Resources reported production of 48,700 tonnes from its two Brazilian smelters in the first quarter, down from 58,700 tonnes in the previous quarter due to raw material shortages. Smelting is proving to be a major bottleneck in the zinc supply chain this year. Global mine production rose 1 percent in the first four months of this year, but refined production was 2 percent lower, according to the latest estimate from the International Lead and Zin Study Group. It is estimated that supplies of refined zinc fell short by 13,000 tonnes during this period. The good news for struggling zinc buyers is that help from China is sailing over the horizon. The country has been a steady importer of refined zinc since it imposed a 15% export tariff in 2008. However, the demand for the metal from the rest of the world is so great that it is now becoming a net exporter. The less good news for everyone else is that this metal only travels as far as Taiwan, destination for 25,750 tons of last month's exports, and Singapore, destination for another 7,400 tons. Both are LME commodity delivery points and it is notable that the only fresh inflows of zinc into the exchange's global storage system have been in Taiwan's Kaohsiung port, which has received nearly 30,000 tonnes since early May. The problem is that the metal is not needed there most, which appears to require a second stage of destocking and onward shipment to either the United States or Europe. In other times, it would be likely that what left China would have gone straight to the place of maximum premium, but against the backdrop of congested ports and still high freight costs, zinc exports are being routed to the nearest LME delivery destination. That will not make daily trading conditions any easier as long as warrants, the ultimate physical pool of liquidity for LME settlement, remain at these depleted levels. How quickly they can rebuild depends on how quickly China can ship excess zinc relative to how long it takes to replenish a depleted supply chain in the rest of the world.

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Friday in Glastonbury - live!

The sun is out, the glitter is on and the bands have started playing - follow us for reviews, photos and more (Author: Gardener)

FridayThis website uses cookies for analytics, personalized content and ads. By continuing to browse this site, you agree to this use. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience. The sun is out, the glitter is on and the bands have started playing - follow us for reviews, photos and more. David Levene was up in the Block9 area (AKA the Naughty Corner) photographing drag troupe Maude Adams and All Those Children rehearsing for tonight's extravaganza at NYC Downlow, Glastonbury's meatpacking-district-style queer club. They perform there every night, and tonight's theme is The Love Ball, "inspired by Suzanne Bartsch's iconic NYC event and the New York ball scene." It's always the best night (and early morning) at the festival: Team Guardian will almost certainly be up there tonight, although I can't make any promises about our moves. Drag queens and kings rehearse in NYC Downlow. Rehearsals in NYC Downlow. Photo: David Levene/The Guardian Photo: David Levene/The Guardian A new Banksy artwork has surfaced on the fence, showing one hippie pounding a protest sign at another. Glastonbury Festival 2022 - Day Three GLASTONBURY, ENGLAND - JUNE 24TH: A new Banksy artwork installed on June 22nd is on day three of the Glastonbury Festival at Worthy Farm, Pilton on June 24th, 2022 in Glastonbury, England , to see. (Photo by Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage) Photo: Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage Kateryna Pavlenko, the frontman of Ukrainian band Go_A, told the Guardian that performing in Glastonbury was the group's "biggest dream come true" and a "great honour". “I dreamed of coming to this festival as a spectator. And I didn't even think we'd ever be invited to perform there," she said. We already anticipate how this will change our lives and our priorities.” The group hopes to spark interest in Glastonbury crowds in Ukrainian culture. "Our band is known for experimenting with Ukrainian folk songs," Pavlenko said. Our songs are not about war. And about spring, which will definitely come to Ukraine,” she said. The singer also spoke about the importance of representation at a festival like Glastonbury. "As President Zelenskiy said during his Grammy speech, 'fill the silence with music.' Everyone should support Ukraine in any way they can, but not remain silent.” Just raising the Ukrainian flag on stage during a performance in another country is already an important manifesto, Pavlenko added. “In this way we won't let the people of the world forget about Ukraine and the fact that war is still raging here. “With our concerts, too, we draw attention to our unique Ukrainian culture and language. We are doing everything to break the Russian information blockade of Europe and to declare that Ukraine is not Russia and the Ukrainian people with their ancient national culture have the right to their own cultural and political existence.” She added: “Ukrainians are a very strong nation. The realities of war are terrifying and incredibly painful, but our music will still resonate as we fight for our freedom to live, love and sound in our homeland." The group said they "appreciate the fact" that Glastonbury is hosting a number of Ukrainian acts this year. "This is a huge support for all of us now," they said. A message from the President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelenskyy was played on the big screens of The Other Stage just before The Libertines stage opening. #Glastonbury2022 pic.twitter.com/LuXf2FfEBf - Glastonbury Festival (@glastonbury) June 24, 2022 The Libertines on the other stage As a devoted teenage Libs fan (I used to draw their tattoos on my arms every day for school) the Watching Pete'n'Carl still singing to his face warms my heart. (L-R) Pete Doherty and Carl Barât of the Libertines perform on the other stage. Photo: Matthew Baker/Redferns It all starts at the Nova Twins Keza MacDonald says it's the "earliest Glastonbury moshpit I've ever seen" on the Greenpeace stage this afternoon. May it be the first of many: the London duo will play three times this weekend! Nova Twins perform on the Greenpeace stage. Photo: Keza MacDonald/The Guardian Our Shaad D'Souza was up front on the pyramid stage asking the early risers who they were waiting for and why. Photo: Laura Snapes Sarah: I'm here for everyone, to be fair, but specifically for Sam Fender. I think he's brilliant, love his music. We usually come with people who are claustrophobic, so we're usually on top of the hill, but [Lauren] is at an age now where we can be close. Lauren: I've seen Billie before, but I love her so much. I also love Wolf Alice so very excited to see her. Ash and Joe. Photo: Laura Snapes/The Guardian Ash: I look forward to seeing just about everyone, but especially Billie - we've seen her before and it's been our tradition ever since. Joe: I'm looking forward to Crowded House the most. They're pretty much seventy, eighty and it's just good music. Pete Doherty just kicked off a chant of "Volodymyr Zelensky," which the crowd joined in and cheered on, reports Sophie Zeldin-O'Neill. Fingers crossed that Wolf Alice gets her 4:45 slot on the Pyramid stage - they're stranded in the US piecing together flights to get to the festival in time. Our flights have been canceled and we have to go to Glastonbury, no kidding - Wolf Alice (@wolfalicemusic) June 23, 2022 We are now waiting for a flight to Seattle from where we can fly direct to LDN 🤞🤞🤞 https://t . co/3b5nH2uSrn— Wolf Alice (@wolfalicemusic) June 23, 2022 Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy addressed the crowd at Glastonbury via video link before the Libertines opened the other stage. The pandemic has put the lives of a million people on hold around the world. We in Ukraine also want to live our lives in freedom. But we will not allow Russia's terrible war to break us... So I turn to you for support. Glastonbury is the greatest concentration of freedom - and I ask you to share that feeling with all those whose freedom is under attack. Help the Ukrainians who have to flee their homeland because of this war. Find our United24 charity platform and put pressure on all politicians you know to help restore peace in Ukraine. Time is precious and every day is measured in human lives. The more people join us to defend freedom and truth, the sooner Russia's war against Ukraine will end. Volodymyr Zelenskyy speaks at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo: Sophie Zeldin-O'Neill/The Guardian Welcome to the Guardian's Glastonbury Liveblog! It's been three long years since we were last at Worthy Farm but Glastonbury is finally back and the Guardian is here to cover the entire weekend. We'll be blogging live from noon to midnight every day, bringing you reviews of the biggest and best acts, plus tons of photos, chats with Glasto players and more. More from The Guardian

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