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F1 owner Liberty Media buys land in Las Vegas for $240 million

Formula 1 commercial rights holders Liberty Media are buying a $240 million property in Las Vegas to build the pit and paddock complex for a grand prix next year, they said on Friday. (Author: Gardener)

Liberty MediaMay 6 (Reuters) - Formula 1 commercial rights holders Liberty Media are buying a $240 million property in Las Vegas to build the pit and paddock complex for a grand prix next year, they said on Friday . Formula 1 and Liberty Media are promoting the race themselves with their entertainment company Live Nation and local stakeholders. "Liberty Media has entered into an agreement to acquire 39 acres east of the Strip to finalize track design and provide pit and paddock capacity," Liberty CEO Greg Maffei told analysts on a earnings call on the first quarter. "I expect the transaction to close in the second quarter and the purchase price to be $240 million. McLaren team principal Zak Brown, reacting to the news at the first Miami Grand Prix, said it was a positive move for the sport "I think Liberty's commitment to Formula 1 has been great," the American told reporters. “I think the fact that Liberty is bringing skin into play in certain parts of the business shows their commitment. “And they're doing it because they think it's going to help him grow, which is good for them and good for us.” Along the 6.12km course of the Las Vegas Grand Prix, drivers will be able to take in landmarks like the Blast by the Bellagio Fountain and Caesars Palace for an event expected to draw 170,000 fans.

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F1's Sebastian Vettel calls out a growing climate crisis ahead of the Miami Grand Prix

Ahead of the new F1 event, the Aston Martin driver said: "I find it alarming and I'm surprised that we're going to a place that won't be there in 50 years." (Author: Gardener)

Sebastian VettelMIAMI—Sebastian Vettel used his platform ahead of the Miami Grand Prix to highlight a growing global issue: climate change. At the opening party on Wednesday, the Aston Martin driver wore a t-shirt that read "Miami 2060 - 1st Grand Prix Underwater - Act Now or Swim Later". When asked if the message was addressed to politicians, Vettel told Sky Sports F1: "No, it's not a political message. I'm not a politician; I don't want to be political. I think that's a very human message. “I think it's great that we have a race [in Miami]. There are great people here and it will be very exciting next weekend. But I find it alarming and surprised that we're going to a place that won't be there in 50 years and everyone is doing and carrying on as usual. Vettel is right: climate change threatens in the coming years that the area will go under water. Flooding more than six feet above the tide line has the potential to fill Hard Rock Stadium with a foot and a half of water, according to analysis by Climate Central ahead of Miami's 2020 Super Bowl LIV. The flood event could occur "through a combination of sea level rise, high tide and storm surge," the report said. A 2019 report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts sea levels in southeast Florida will rise two and a half feet by 2060. Hard Rock Stadium is less than 10 feet above sea level. "The situation is very, very serious," Vettel told Sky Sports. "Obviously I wanted to express my feelings with the t-shirt, and rather than just drawing a dark cloud or a bad scenario, I thought I'd do it in a way that people could understand and maybe relate to. She doesn't try to take a political stand.

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Lewis Hamilton unhappy with F1 jewelry ban but takes off earrings despite threatening to sit out

Hamilton said he was willing not to host the Miami Grand Prix if F1 enforced a ban on jewelry, but later backed down (Author: Gardener)

Lewis HamiltonSeven-time Formula One world champion Lewis Hamilton used a Friday morning press conference to rail against an FIA ban on jewelry, but later backed down after a series of talks with FIA officials, according to a Press Association report . Hamilton will now remove his ear piercings for this weekend after indicating he is ready to sit out the Miami Grand Prix in defiance of F1 rules. FIA officials issued a notice to competitors on Thursday, explaining that "the wearing of jewelry (sic) in the form of piercings or metal necklaces is prohibited during competition and may therefore be checked before the start", as a reminder of a recent sanctions agency crackdown on drivers who wear jewellery. Hamilton has expressed that he feels unfairly offended by the rule and, as if to clarify, he showed up for his press conference seemingly wearing as many rings, necklaces, bracelets and watches as he could. "I feel like it's almost like a step backwards when you think about the steps we're taking as a sport and the more important issues and causes that we need to focus on," Hamilton said. I've been in sports for 16 years, I've been wearing jewelry for 16 years. In the car I always wear only my earrings and my nose ring, which I can't even take off. Hamilton then went on to state that he was willing to sit out the Miami Grand Prix, explaining that his team had a backup driver (Nick de Vries) and that "there's a lot to do in the city anyway". However, he later agreed to take out his earrings while receiving a two-race Therapeutic Use Exemption for his nose ring, which cannot be easily removed. The FIA ​​​​has banned drivers from wearing jewelry in the cockpit for several years - on the grounds that jewelry poses a safety risk that could, among other things, hinder medical intervention and emergency rescue in the event of a serious accident. But after several years of lax enforcement, the rule is now being enforced much more strictly by F1 racing director Niels Wittich and FIA President Mohamed ben Sulayem. Last week the FIA ​​gave Formula E drivers Pascal Wehrlein and Mitch Evans a harsh sentence for wearing necklaces in their cockpits, handing them a suspended €1,000 fine and adding a point to their licences. Off the track, Hamilton's disagreements with FIA officials over the jewelry ban are a distraction from what has been a dreadful start to the 2022 season for the seven-time world champion.

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I will not race if Formula 1 enforces jewelry ban

Lewis Hamilton said he will spend the weekend sightseeing in Miami rather than racing this weekend if the sport's governing body, the FIA, toughly enforces a ban on drivers wearing jewelry in cars. (Author: Gardener)

FormulaMIAMI — Lewis Hamilton has called Formula 1's ban on drivers wearing jewelry in cars "a step backwards" and "very silly" and said he would happily spend the weekend sightseeing in Miami rather than racing this weekend drive when the sport's governing body, the FIA ​​​​rigorously enforces the rule. Ahead of Sunday's Miami Grand Prix, race director Niels Wittich reminded drivers that under the FIA's International Sporting Code they are forbidden from wearing jewelry in cars, which was also lifted ahead of April's Australian Grand Prix. In Miami, the FIA ​​​​banned jewelry as part of a Technical Acceptance Declaration distributed to all teams and clarified what clothing drivers must wear under their overalls for safety reasons. Wittich's clarification: "The wearing of jewelry during competition can impede medical interventions as well as subsequent diagnosis and treatment if this should be necessary after an accident. The presence of jewelry can delay the emergency due to the risk of "snagging" Removal of rider safety equipment such as helmet, balaclava and overalls." be checked before take-off." Hamilton appeared to make a point in Friday morning's press conference as he wore multiple necklaces, rings on each finger and three watches, each set to a different time zone. "I couldn't wear any more jewelry today" , he joked when asked about the ban. Hamilton said he has two piercings that are difficult to remove. "I have platinum so it's not magnetic. In 16 years I've had so many MRI scans and I didn't have to take the platinum out because it wasn't easy." Hamilton, who added he was ready to sign a waiver absolving the FIA ​​of responsibility, could FIA President Mohammed bin Sulayem on Thursday but said he plans to discuss the issue ahead of Sunday's race."I feel like it's almost like a step backwards when you think about the steps we're taking as a sport and the bigger causes that we need to focus on," he added. "I think we've made really big strides as a sport. It's such a small thing. "I've been in sport for 16 years and I've been wearing jewelry for 16 years. In the car, I only ever wear my earrings and my nose ring, which I can't even take off." The four drivers sat next to Hamilton in the press conference, he offered his support. AlphaTauri's Pierre Gasly said he would do without a n religious symbol not comfortable when he is racing. "I see [Hamilton's comments]. I think there are bigger things to focus on. "I have a religious item that I wear to races, which is important to me. I don't feel comfortable wearing it I don't have it in the car. I feel like it's personal, we should be free to do what. We believe it's the right thing for us. It should be a personal choice."

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The inaugural F1 Grand Prix in Miami

It's almost time for the lights out in the Sunshine State. Find out the fake Marina, what you missed this season and how the drivers feel about the second US race. (Author: Gardener)

F1 Grand PrixMIAMI — Formula 1 fans, it's almost time to turn off the lights in the Sunshine State. Planning for the first Grand Prix began in 2019, but groundbreaking didn't happen until April 21. Over the past 12 months, 24,000 tons of asphalt were poured around the popular Hard Rock Stadium, home of the Dolphins, in Miami Gardens. It enters the Formula 1 schedule as the second race in the United States (the U.S. Grand Prix at the Circuit of The Americas in Austin is the other). Hard Rock Stadium has grown into a global entertainment hub, hosting the Miami Open, the 2020 Super Bowl and the 21 College Football Playoffs National Championship, among others. Jay Z, Beyonce, Coldplay and U2 have all hosted concerts at this historic venue, and now some of motorsport's finest will be zipping around a 5.41 km (approx. 3.36 mile) track called the Miami International Autodrome. With the race scheduled to start at 3:30 p.m. ET on Sunday, here's what you need to know as you head to the new track. There's a new battle for the world and constructors' titles - Charles Leclerc vs. Leclerc won the season-opening race in Bahrain, finished second to Verstappen, who clinched victory in Saudi Arabia, and found his way back to first place in Australia. However, on April 24 at Imola he dropped to sixth place while Verstappen drove to victory. Meanwhile, the Dutchman retired early in both races that Leclerc won. Mercedes are struggling to find consistency in their car despite George Russell being the only F1 driver to finish inside the top 5 in every race this season. A particular concern for the team is porpoising, which refers to the jerky bounce of the suspension at high speeds felt by the driver. The young Brit stressed that Imola was “the first weekend I really struggled with my back and chest pains from the severity of the impact. But we just have to get the fastest lap times out of the car.” “When the car and tires are in the right-hand window, apart from the hopping, the car feels really good. It's the most extreme thing I've ever felt," added Russell. “I really hope that we find a solution and I hope that every team that is struggling with jumping finds a solution because it is not sustainable for the riders to continue at this level.” As the team after Came to Miami, it updated its front wing endplates, rear wing and beam wing. "There was a lot of work going on behind the scenes, everyone worked as hard as they could," said Lewis Hamilton during a press conference ahead of Free Practice 1. I'm just grateful that everyone kept their heads down and for the incredible hard work that everyone is doing.” When asked, “Do you think you'll get close to the pace?” The seven-time world champion said, “I don't expect big changes in that sense.” What is the route like? The Miami International Autodrome will feature 19 corners with three straights, the longest of which is 1.28 km. There will be three DRS zones and according to Formula1.com qualifying lap times are expected to be around one minute and 28 seconds. As Ferrari's Leclerc pointed out to Sports Illustrated, keep an eye on Turns 11-16. Beyond the track itself, there are a few areas that fans are likely to notice, such as the marina. How do the drivers feel about the Grand Prix? I think it's safe to say that the riders have embraced the Miami lifestyle. What are the race times?

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How to watch the Miami Grand Prix

The arrival of F1 in Florida could be a milestone in the growth of the sport in America. (Author: Gardener)

the Miami Grand PrixWhere Formula 1 is currently on its journey in the US is debatable, but the direction the series is taking is undeniable. After missing the 2020 F1 schedule due to COVID restrictions, over 400,000 fans flocked to the Circuit of the Americas (COTA) in Austin, TX last fall. Part of this surge in interest is thanks to the Netflix series Drive to Survive, which is credited every time a team boss, driver or reporter talks about Formula 1's growth in recent years. The next defining moment in the sport's relationship with America lands this weekend with the debut of the Miami Grand Prix. As part of a ten-year deal, Miami marks the first time in nearly four decades that the US has hosted two F1 races in the same season and becomes the eleventh American circuit to host a Grand Prix. To meet that demand, McLaren CEO Zak Brown explained on the latest F1 Nation podcast that he "never in [his] 20 years in the sport has seen so much attention, the number of hospitality and appearance requests, celebrity guests and sponsorship interest." TV ratings on ESPN are steadily improving and Miami could easily end up in the top five rated F1 races in US history. With the next TV deal in the works and a new Grand Prix of It's a great time to be an American F1 fan in Las Vegas on the famous Strip in 2023. New regulations have seen Ferrari jump to the top, while the middle of the grid is the most competitive in years. Current championship leader Charles Leclerc and 2020 title winner Max Verstappen have traded wins in the open four rounds of the season, with Ferrari's Leclerc going 27 points clear to the Miami weekend. Meanwhile, Mercedes, winners of the last eight constructors' titles, continue to struggle with their new 2022 car. Lewis Hamilton is seventh overall after finishing 13th last time out in Australia. Both Valtteri Bottas and Pierre Gasly gave the track positive reviews after spending time in the simulator this week. We should look forward to a very smooth surface designed for a high level of grip. And as if a brand new F1 track in Miami wasn't enough, the promotion team has done everything to make this an event like no other. The track begins by circling NFL Stadium from the start/finish line to Turn 4. After a long, twisty and extremely fast section at Turn 11 we find The Beach, which features two levels of cabanas and two resort-style pools will , and a 24,000-square-foot beach. This race will definitely have the Miami vibe. For those who don't have cable and want to watch the Miami Grand Prix weekend, you can subscribe directly to F1TV to follow every race, qualifying and practice session throughout the 2022 season. Just like last season, there is a two-car battle at the top. Max Verstappen is a slight favorite at +100, followed by Charles Leclerc (+125). Further behind are seven-time champions Lewis Hamilton and Lando Norris (both at +4000) and new Mercedes driver George Russell at +6000. * Given the limited time in the track simulators, how will the drivers get used to a brand new track? * Mercedes and Ferrari are rumored to be bringing upgrades to their cars. And has Mercedes finally found a solution to its porpoise problems to give Lewis Hamilton a chance to fight at the top? * How could rain affect qualifying and the Grand Prix? At the moment the weather forecast calls for clear skies for Friday's practice sessions and Saturday's qualifying heats, but there is still a chance of rain during the race on Sunday afternoon. * We've seen a much more balanced and competitive midfield so far this season, with 18 riders already scoring points. Which midfield team will be fastest on a brand new circuit? * And after closing the championship gap on Charles Leclerc in Italy last week, can Max once again dominate the weekend to take himself and Red Bull straight to the top of the standings? It all starts on Friday afternoon when Formula 1 welcomes the all-new Miami Grand Prix. Before heading out, check out F1 drivers trying to guess the city associated with various NFL, NBA, MLB, MLS and NHL teams.

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Finally, after the hype, F1 cars hit Miami and there are a few surprises in store

Mercedes' George Russell led Friday's FP2 in Miami (Author: Gardener)

Miami* Charles Leclerc led the first-ever F1 practice session at the purpose-built track in Miami. * George Russell led FP2 in a session that saw problems for Max Verstappen and Carlos Sainz. * Drivers had mixed reactions to the 19-turn layout around Hard Rock Stadium and through Florida's Turnpike. Following the hype leading up to the event, Formula 1 cars made their debut at the Miami International Autodrome on Friday - and it was Mercedes' George Russell who surprisingly set the pace. For the first time in dry conditions in 2022, Mercedes ended up with the fastest package after bringing in a couple of updates to fix the performance issues it was facing with its W13. Mercedes has been third best for most of the season and has a best qualifying result in fifth and a race result in third, but in Miami on Friday it was the leader. Russell set a time of 1'29.938 to finish 0.106s ahead of championship leader Charles Leclerc, while Sergio Perez was the fastest Red Bull driver in third overall. "To be honest, we don't really understand why we're sort of blasting it," said Russell, who suspected the hotter conditions could help the package. “The car is working well but it's only Friday, I'm not exaggerating.” World Champion Max Verstappen was effectively benched after the second practice session due to a hydraulic problem in his out-lap that caused a small fire, while Carlos Sainz ' Difficult run continued when he crashed his Ferrari at Turn 13. Valtteri Bottas was another rider to find on Friday's wall, spinning backwards during the first session at Turn 7 - the tightening left-hander that caused several others to spin. As expected, it was a hot and muggy day in Miami, with temperatures reaching 94°F, reminding riders of the sweltering conditions they had previously encountered in Malaysia or nearby Singapore. The first was how slippery it was offline - leading riders to believe that unless steps are taken to remedy it could have a negative impact on Sunday's action. "It's really disappointing that there is no grip offline, the race will be bad because of that," said Red Bull's Sergio Perez ' said Haas' Kevin Magnussen, who couldn't recall a similar situation elsewhere. Aston Martin's Sebastian Vettel agreed that "if we're going to race we need to be able to go side-by-side and at the moment there's only one line," while McLaren's Lando Norris added that "there's a is a bit strange. This slippery nature, compounded by the hot weather conditions, means tire wear is likely to be a key factor in Sunday's race. The drivers will also face a test of their fitness, with Lewis Hamilton commenting that he lost two kilos from Friday's race. The tricky, narrow off-camber complex under Florida's turnpike was one of the biggest challenges for the riders. There Sainz spun and wiped the front left side of his Ferrari F1-75. "The track is quite nice to drive apart from the chicane... I don't want to publish that quote so I'll stick with it," said seven-time champion Hamilton before stretching it out a bit. Mercedes teammate George Russell agreed that “it's still a bit of a headbanger in there! "I think it's a bit too slow to be honest," Haas' Mick Schumacher said of the section. Overall, Miami has the thumbs up after two hours of Formula 1 on Friday. Qualifying takes place on Saturday to determine the starting grid for the first Miami race on Sunday.

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F1 lands in US for Miami GP amid controversy

F1 and Miami are such a good match that it's a wonder organizers' plans for American expansion didn't start there. But not everyone is involved in the celebrations (Author: Gardener)

MiamiSpring fever has gripped Formula 1. It shows Charles Leclerc playing tag with the Marlins' Jazz Chisholm Jr., Lewis Hamilton teeing off with Tom Brady and Daniel Ricciardo, and Lando Norris chasing James Corden through the paddock in his cut-off team shirts. That could only happen in Miami. And it's a miracle it didn't happen sooner. This weekend, F1 will host its first-ever race in Miami as the US hosts two Grands Prix for the first time since 1984, when the series landed in Detroit and Dallas. But this time, instead of returning to Motown or Moo Town, F1 has parked its giant traveling circus here, in the land of white sandy beaches, neon lights and crushing heat. It's another breakthrough for a sport that has long struggled to break into the US market. And though Formula 1's embrace of social media, Netflix's Drive to Survive and Sky Sports (via ESPN) has played a big part in winning over viewers across the pond, many of whom have been drawn to it since the very beginning couldn't be less interested in motorsport It's odd that the American seduction of F1 didn't start in Miami – America's exotic escape abroad. (Austin, however, is cool, quirky, and has managed to establish Formula One in the US.) The series came closest to Miami when Sebring, Fla., a fabled inland racing location three hours north, served as the backdrop for the one-off Racing served the 1959 US Grand Prix. While Long Beach, Watkins Glen and other long-ago US Grand Prix locations have their charms, Miami has always been America's closest thing to a true F1 city. It's cosmopolitan, seedy, and a playground for a few celebrities — not least Hamilton. There's a culture of pathetic excess, flashy cars and racing between traffic lights. IndyCar raced here in the '80s and '90s, Nascar hosted its season finale at nearby Homestead for nearly two decades, and in 2015, Formula E raced at Biscayne Bay. Indeed, you will hardly find a more perfect venue for an F1 race. With Las Vegas on the agenda for next year, this is clearly just the tip of F1's American expansion. Though Formula 1 struggled to race downtown along the city's famous waterfront, it ended up half an hour north of downtown in Miami Gardens, the sleeper development that's home to the Miami Dolphins' Hard Rock Stadium. Ultimately, an influential neighborhood association couldn't get the vibe from noise pollution and traffic congestion to this new Miami Sound Machine. (Formula E cars, with their near-silent electric motors, have at least sidestepped the first concern.) The race itself will follow a makeshift 5.4km street course around the stadium, under a motorway overpass that will surely come to a halt at some point below green will. To bring more of that Tubbs and Crockett flavor to the race — appropriately sponsored by a cryptocurrency firm as Miami seeks to become the blockchain's Wall Street — organizers added a pool area, two floors of cabanas, and a fake marina views looks like something out of Minecraft. But it's not just the normos who are embracing the quintessentially Miami artifice. Seven years ago, at the US Grand Prix in Austin, Hamilton openly puzzled in a pre-race press conference about how the Americans could be brought into Formula 1. Viewing the scene here at a sponsorship event earlier this week, he called the Miami GP "a dream". Miami Gardens, the largest city in Florida with a majority black population, has been dreading the arrival of this motorsport Super Bowl since its attempts to move the race elsewhere were thwarted three years ago. In 2020, a group of residents led by former Miami-Dade County Commissioner Betty Ferguson sued Formula One, Hard Rock Stadium, the Dolphins and former Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez over racial discrimination. A recall election was sought last May to remove council members who voted to bring the race to Miami Gardens. (In the end, the recall failed to garner the required number of signatures to initiate a vote.) Worse than lawmakers who went to bed with F1, residents felt they had agreed to a bad deal - one , which promised only $5 million in community benefits and 5% of the proceeds to the city. Additionally, Miami Gardens residents are committed to this deal for a decade, with F1 President Stefano Domenicali promising to make "a positive and lasting contribution to people in the local community". It doesn't matter that injured residents have vowed to keep fighting. It's an undercurrent of controversy that puts Miami squarely in league with Sochi, Saudi Arabia and other dubious F1 crash pads. So it seems that a Grand Prix would finally be held here. It's a real homecoming.

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Everything you need to know about F1's inaugural Miami Grand Prix

Everything you want and need to know about this weekend's Miami Grand Prix. (Author: Gardener)

Miami Grand PrixAfter years of anticipation with many Formula One fans hoping this weekend would finally arrive, F1 takes on Miami for the first time with Sunday's Miami Grand Prix (3:30pm ET, ABC). Taking place on a purpose built track around Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, the race will hopefully live up to all the hype and produce some compelling racing alongside some fantastic views. But because the Miami Grand Prix is ​​new to the schedule this year - it joins the US Grand Prix at the Circuit of The Americas in Austin as the only other American F1 race currently ahead of Las Vegas 2023 being added to the mix – it might be It can be helpful to know a few quick facts about the event and the venue. Before the action hits the track, here's what you want and need to know about the Miami Grand Prix. Seven-time F1 World Champion Lewis Hamilton was a guest on Good Morning America this week to talk about Miami and said: "It's a bit nerve-wracking because it's going to be such a big event for us. But now that the Netflix series Drive to Survive is growing, we now have two Grands Prix in the States and then we have another one in Vegas next year. So it's going to be huge." McLaren driver Daniel Ricciardo recently joined Trevor Noah on The Daily Show ahead of the Miami Grand Prix, and the Australian racer who is known to love racing in the US. But he also explained the challenges facing F1 drivers one new circuit and like many other racers rely on simulators for preparation."Getting onto a new circuit gives you a chance to find something quicker than someone else, so maybe it can create a greater separation for those clicking." , and maybe for those who have a little more trouble," said Ricciardo. Scenic views of the F1 Miami Grand Prix taken on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 in Miami Gardens, Fla. (Mary Holt/F1 Miami Grand Prix) The venue is located located in Miami Gardens, nearly encircles Hard Rock Stadium and includes much of the stadium's surrounding parking lot.But the Miami Grand Prix is ​​tech I don't see Hard Rock. It's the Miami International Autodrome. The circuit loops around three of the four sides of Hard Rock Stadium and through the adjacent Miami Open tennis courts. It is 5.41 kilometers long, or approximately 3.36 miles, and features 19 corners, three straights and three DRS zones. On the first lap or after the safety car restarts, we may see some overtakes at Turn 4 as the cars speed through the first three turns.” After initially taking place in downtown Miami, this race ended about 16 miles north of that area . And to perfect the ideal layout for the circuit, F1 and Apex Circuit Design created 36 different simulations before settling on the current 19-turn circuit. "You could walk around the top deck of the stadium and see every corner of the circuit - and that's quite unique," said Tom Garfinkel, vice-chairman, president & CEO, Hard Rock Stadium. You may have heard of it... Since Miami Gardens is so north of Miami and not particularly close to the coast, the event organizers had to get a little creative to still have some sort of marina/beach vibe to the race. The yachts in the MIA Marina, taken on Sunday May 1st, 2022 in Miami Gardens, Florida (Hiro Ueno/F1 Miami Grand Prix) And this very dramatic video describes how it was made, including the homage to Hard Rock Stadium at the top: Circuit of The Americas in 2019. While F1's visit to Miami is a first and part of a 10-year deal, it has previously raced across the US. The country has hosted 71 Grands Prix, which is a record for any country with F1 racing. Before Miami was added, the U.S. Grand Prix in COTA the only American race on the schedule in recent years. And 2023 will see three US races, with Las Vegas competing alongside Austin and Miami. But beyond that, the US has a rich history of hosting F1 events, including the Indianapolis 500, once upon a time. Indianapolis Motor Speedway: 19 races, 1950-1960 (Indy 500) and 2000-2007 (U.S. Grands Prix) Riverside International Raceway (California): 1 race, 1960 Watkins Glen International (New York): 20 races, 1961-1980 Long Beach Street Course (California): 8 races, 1976-1983 Las Vegas (in the parking lot of Caesars Palace): 2 races, 1981-1982 Street Course Detroit: 7 races, 1982-1988 Street Course Phoenix: 3 races, 1989-1991 Circuit of The Americas (Austin): 9 races*, 2012-2019 and 2021 S. Grand Prix canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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F1 lands in US for Miami GP amid controversy

F1 and Miami are such a good match that it's a wonder organizers' plans for American expansion didn't start there. But not everyone is involved in the celebrations (Author: Gardener)

MiamiSpring fever has gripped Formula 1. It shows Charles Leclerc playing tag with the Marlins' Jazz Chisholm Jr., Lewis Hamilton teeing off with Tom Brady and Daniel Ricciardo, and Lando Norris chasing James Corden through the paddock in his cut-off team shirts. That could only happen in Miami. And it's a miracle it didn't happen sooner. This weekend, F1 will host its first-ever race in Miami as the US hosts two Grands Prix for the first time since 1984, when the series landed in Detroit and Dallas. But this time, instead of returning to Motown or Moo Town, F1 has parked its giant traveling circus here, in the land of white sandy beaches, neon lights and crushing heat. It's another breakthrough for a sport that has long struggled to break into the US market. And though Formula 1's embrace of social media, Netflix's Drive to Survive and Sky Sports (via ESPN) has played a big part in winning over viewers across the pond, many of whom have been drawn to it since the very beginning couldn't be less interested in motorsport It's odd that the American seduction of F1 didn't start in Miami – America's exotic escape abroad. (Austin, however, is cool, quirky, and has managed to establish Formula One in the US.) The series came closest to Miami when Sebring, Fla., a fabled inland racing location three hours north, served as the backdrop for the one-off Racing served the 1959 US Grand Prix. While Long Beach, Watkins Glen and other long-ago US Grand Prix locations have their charms, Miami has always been America's closest thing to a true F1 city. It's cosmopolitan, seedy, and a playground for a few celebrities — not least Hamilton. There's a culture of pathetic excess, flashy cars and racing between traffic lights. IndyCar raced here in the '80s and '90s, Nascar hosted its season finale at nearby Homestead for nearly two decades, and in 2015, Formula E raced at Biscayne Bay. Indeed, you will hardly find a more perfect venue for an F1 race. With Las Vegas on the agenda for next year, this is clearly just the tip of F1's American expansion. Though Formula 1 struggled to race downtown along the city's famous waterfront, it ended up half an hour north of downtown in Miami Gardens, the sleeper development that's home to the Miami Dolphins' Hard Rock Stadium. Ultimately, an influential neighborhood association couldn't get the vibe from noise pollution and traffic congestion to this new Miami Sound Machine. (Formula E cars, with their near-silent electric motors, have at least sidestepped the first concern.) The race itself will follow a makeshift 5.4km street course around the stadium, under a motorway overpass that will surely come to a halt at some point below green will. To bring more of that Tubbs and Crockett flavor to the race — appropriately sponsored by a cryptocurrency firm as Miami seeks to become the blockchain's Wall Street — organizers added a pool area, two floors of cabanas, and a fake marina views looks like something out of Minecraft. But it's not just the normos who are embracing the quintessentially Miami artifice. Seven years ago, at the US Grand Prix in Austin, Hamilton openly puzzled in a pre-race press conference about how the Americans could be brought into Formula 1. Viewing the scene here at a sponsorship event earlier this week, he called the Miami GP "a dream". Miami Gardens, the largest city in Florida with a majority black population, has been dreading the arrival of this motorsport Super Bowl since its attempts to move the race elsewhere were thwarted three years ago. In 2020, a group of residents led by former Miami-Dade County Commissioner Betty Ferguson sued Formula One, Hard Rock Stadium, the Dolphins and former Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez over racial discrimination. A recall election was sought last May to remove council members who voted to bring the race to Miami Gardens. (In the end, the recall failed to garner the required number of signatures to initiate a vote.) Worse than lawmakers who went to bed with F1, residents felt they had agreed to a bad deal - one , which promised only $5 million in community benefits and 5% of the proceeds to the city. Additionally, Miami Gardens residents are committed to this deal for a decade, with F1 President Stefano Domenicali promising to make "a positive and lasting contribution to people in the local community". It doesn't matter that injured residents have vowed to keep fighting. It's an undercurrent of controversy that puts Miami squarely in league with Sochi, Saudi Arabia and other dubious F1 crash pads. So it seems that a Grand Prix would finally be held here. It's a real homecoming.

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