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‘Thursday was pretty cool. But the semi-final on Friday is even better'

The UConn men's basketball team defeated Seton Hall in a Big East tournament on Thursday... (Author: Gardener)

ThursdayJ. Cole (2) and Isaiah Whaley (5) celebrate during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyler Polley, right, during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) saves the ball from Seton Hall's Jared Rhoden during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MARCH 10: Head coach Dan Hurley of the Connecticut Huskies reacts in the first half against the Seton Hall Pirates during the 2022 Big East Tournament at Madison Square Garden on March 10, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images) NEW YORK -- To appreciate everything that will become of Madison Square Garden during the Big East Tournament -- how it feels, how it sounds, what it means -- takes more than one night and more than one game. This event always has a must-for-Friday feel, something Jim Calhoun talked about for years, something Dan Hurley certainly thought of both before and after the UConn men's basketball team with a 62-52 extended stay in Manhattan had earned a quarterfinal win over Seton Hall. "I got out of here a little earlier than usual just because I wanted to experience it," Hurley said well past midnight, walking across the plaza, the garden finally empty after being packed all Thursday. Because it's special.” The Garden really is a beautiful basketball contradiction. It's a museum and a zoo. It's sophisticated and obnoxious. It's great. It's rough. It's huge. It's stuffy. More for youWhat UConn's Dan Hurley said after Seton Hall's winHow UConn women could end up in the NCAA Bridgeport Regional A team can lose at the Garden in March and leave New York after feeling like they've seen it all. One and one at the Big East tournament? That's what the Huskies did on Thursday with perhaps their best defensive display of the season, smearing Seton Hall into a court surrounded by cheers and pushing the Pirates back to South Orange, N. UConn, is in the semis on Friday against Villanova, who erased from a 17-point deficit to defeat St. John's and open Thursday night's doubleheader. It really is all gravy now. Everything that makes the garden unique is only boosted on Friday, and just participating in this stage is meaningful, both reward and opportunity. UConn-Villanova is a marquee event. Every team still involved, no matter what the experience gets from here, triggered the depressurization knowing there were at least two hours left on this wild stage. "Not necessarily pressure from UConn," Hurley said. “I think there's pressure to validate the very good regular season we've had, to come in and beat a very good Seton Hall team. This group deserves to see a semi-final on Friday. … Thursday was pretty cool. But Friday's semifinals are even better.” A quarterfinal win over Seton Hall, Hurley's alma mater, is hardly something that would show up on a program highlights montage, signal a new direction in marketing, or slow traffic when the news of the Times Square tickers were running. After all, UConn has won this tournament seven times. But his special version of the huskies had never attempted such an environment in this new era. This was a new platform made so alive by everything that UConn fans had grown accustomed to for 30 years. UConn has gone back to its roots with its return to the great east. Now it's returning to something it first tasted and thrived on Thursday. The Huskies reached the semifinals last season — in a practically empty gym. Two years ago they got going late in the season and headed to Forth Worth, Tex. for a UK tournament that was canceled early in the pandemic. Three years ago, Hurley's freshman season, UConn defeated South Florida in an AAC first-round game in Memphis and was blown out by Houston 84-45 in the quarterfinals. After that game on the FedEx Forum, Hurley held a press conference and spoke about how far the program needed to go. "There was nobody at that game," Hurley said. After more than two weeks of war, the Russian military is pushing ahead at great cost. That depends on how much hardship the Russian elites will endure. Outside the West, Putin is less isolated than you might think. The Stamford man has been charged after allegedly selling cocaine to an undercover cop, police say Thursday's Big East sessions sold out. "This is our first Big East tournament, legit and authentic," Hurley said. “This was our first true live conference tournament game in front of fans in a few years. That's why you come to a place like UConn to play. The big dogs play in the quarters and semifinals. The place rocked with so many UConn fans. On Thursday was the welcome party. UConn fans hit Manhattan on buses and trains and made their presence felt. "Welcome to a packed Madison Square Garden, the most famous arena in the world," the announcer said during the final warm-up. Eleven years to the day after Cardiac Kemba Walker made his famous step backwards to beat Pitt, the defining moment of a five-win-five-day run that set the stage for the 2011 national championship, UConn reached another level back. The Huskies last played in front of fans at this tournament in 2012. UConn wasn't fooling around on the pitch. That wasn't pretty basketball. Andre Jackson (six points, six rebounds, four assists) influenced the game in ways that don't do box-score justice. Cole and Tyrese Martin each had 17 points. UConn held Seton Hall in 7-for-28 shooting in the first half to lead 29-18. The lead was extended to 16 midway through the second half. The party started hours before the game and stretched from the sidelines to the upper bowl, down the tower's escalators and onto the downtown streets. UConn was back in New York for the first time in a long time. "We have the best fans in the world," said Cole. The garden is a special place.” Especially on a Friday evening in March. It's not a must-win game. It's a game to be experienced. Thoroughly beaten by Villanova in Philadelphia in early February, UConn won a Thriller in Hartford later in the month. The rubber match in the semifinals will not define the Huskies' season. It will feel like it has that power, for two hours on a stage that UConn has been absent from for so long.

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‘Thursday was pretty cool. But the semi-final on Friday is even better'

The UConn men's basketball team defeated Seton Hall in a Big East tournament on Thursday... (Author: Gardener)

ThursdayJ. Cole (2) and Isaiah Whaley (5) celebrate during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyler Polley, right, during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) saves the ball from Seton Hall's Jared Rhoden during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MARCH 10: Head coach Dan Hurley of the Connecticut Huskies reacts in the first half against the Seton Hall Pirates during the 2022 Big East Tournament at Madison Square Garden on March 10, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images) NEW YORK -- To appreciate everything that will become of Madison Square Garden during the Big East Tournament -- how it feels, how it sounds, what it means -- takes more than one night and more than one game. This event always has a must-for-Friday feel, something Jim Calhoun talked about for years, something Dan Hurley certainly thought of both before and after the UConn men's basketball team with a 62-52 extended stay in Manhattan had earned a quarterfinal win over Seton Hall. "I got out of here a little earlier than usual just because I wanted to experience it," Hurley said well past midnight, walking across the plaza, the garden finally empty after being packed all Thursday. Because it's special.” The Garden really is a beautiful basketball contradiction. It's a museum and a zoo. It's sophisticated and obnoxious. It's great. It's rough. It's huge. It's stuffy. What UConn's Dan Hurley said after Seton Hall's winHow UConn women could end up in the NCAA Bridgeport Regional A team can lose at the Garden in March and leave New York after feeling like they've seen it all. One and one at the Big East tournament? That's what the Huskies did on Thursday with perhaps their best defensive display of the season, smearing Seton Hall into a court surrounded by cheers and pushing the Pirates back to South Orange, N. UConn, is in the semis on Friday against Villanova, who erased from a 17-point deficit to defeat St. John's and open Thursday night's doubleheader. It really is all gravy now. Everything that makes the garden unique is only boosted on Friday, and just participating in this stage is meaningful, both reward and opportunity. UConn-Villanova is a marquee event. The stakes are of course high. Every team still involved, no matter what the experience gets from here, triggered the depressurization knowing there were at least two hours left on this wild stage. "Not necessarily pressure from UConn," Hurley said. “I think there's pressure to validate the very good regular season we've had, to come in and beat a very good Seton Hall team. This group deserves to see a semi-final on Friday. … Thursday was pretty cool. But Friday's semifinals are even better.” A quarterfinal win over Seton Hall, Hurley's alma mater, is hardly something that would show up on a program highlights montage, signal a new direction in marketing, or slow traffic when the news of the Times Square tickers were running. After all, UConn has won this tournament seven times. But his special version of the huskies had never attempted such an environment in this new era. This was a new platform made so alive by everything that UConn fans had grown accustomed to for 30 years. UConn has gone back to its roots with its return to the great east. Now it's returning to something it first tasted and thrived on Thursday. The Huskies reached the semifinals last season — in a practically empty gym. Two years ago they got going late in the season and headed to Forth Worth, Tex. for a UK tournament that was canceled early in the pandemic. Three years ago, Hurley's freshman season, UConn defeated South Florida in an AAC first-round game in Memphis and was blown out by Houston 84-45 in the quarterfinals. After that game on the FedEx Forum, Hurley held a press conference and spoke about how far the program needed to go. "There was nobody at that game," Hurley said. It's the crime that CT attorneys say "fits almost all transactions": wire fraud These four CT women changed the game in medicine, manufacturing, genetics and astronomy. "This is our first Big East tournament, legit and authentic," Hurley said. “This was our first true live conference tournament game in front of fans in a few years. That's why you come to a place like UConn to play. The big dogs play in the quarters and semifinals. The place rocked with so many UConn fans. On Thursday was the welcome party. UConn fans hit Manhattan on buses and trains and made their presence felt. "Welcome to a packed Madison Square Garden, the most famous arena in the world," the announcer said during the final warm-up. Eleven years to the day after Cardiac Kemba Walker made his famous step backwards to beat Pitt, the defining moment of a five-win-five-day run that set the stage for the 2011 national championship, UConn reached another level back. The Huskies last played in front of fans at this tournament in 2012. UConn wasn't fooling around on the pitch. Andre Jackson (six points, six rebounds, four assists) influenced the game in ways that don't do box-score justice. Cole and Tyrese Martin each had 17 points. UConn held Seton Hall in 7-for-28 shooting in the first half to lead 29-18. The party started hours before the game and stretched from the sidelines to the upper bowl, down the tower's escalators and onto the downtown streets. UConn was back in New York for the first time in a long time. "We have the best fans in the world," said Cole. The garden is a special place.” Especially on a Friday evening in March. It's not a must-win game. It's a game to be experienced. Thoroughly beaten by Villanova in Philadelphia in early February, UConn won a Thriller in Hartford later in the month. The rubber match in the semifinals will not define the Huskies' season. It will feel like it has that power, for two hours on a stage that UConn has been absent from for so long.

Read

‘Thursday was pretty cool. But the semi-final on Friday is even better'

The UConn men's basketball team defeated Seton Hall in a Big East tournament on Thursday... (Author: Gardener)

ThursdayJ. Cole (2) and Isaiah Whaley (5) celebrate during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyler Polley, right, during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) saves the ball from Seton Hall's Jared Rhoden during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MARCH 10: Head coach Dan Hurley of the Connecticut Huskies reacts in the first half against the Seton Hall Pirates during the 2022 Big East Tournament at Madison Square Garden on March 10, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images) NEW YORK -- To appreciate everything that will become of Madison Square Garden during the Big East Tournament -- how it feels, how it sounds, what it means -- takes more than one night and more than one game. This event always has a must-for-Friday feel, something Jim Calhoun talked about for years, something Dan Hurley certainly thought of both before and after the UConn men's basketball team with a 62-52 extended stay in Manhattan had earned a quarterfinal win over Seton Hall. "I got out of here a little earlier than usual just because I wanted to experience it," Hurley said well past midnight, walking across the plaza, the garden finally empty after being packed all Thursday. Because it's special.” The Garden really is a beautiful basketball contradiction. It's a museum and a zoo. It's sophisticated and obnoxious. It's great. It's rough. It's huge. It's stuffy. What UConn's Dan Hurley said after Seton Hall's winHow UConn women could end up in the NCAA Bridgeport Regional A team can lose at the Garden in March and leave New York after feeling like they've seen it all. One and one at the Big East tournament? That's what the Huskies did on Thursday with perhaps their best defensive display of the season, smearing Seton Hall into a court surrounded by cheers and pushing the Pirates back to South Orange, N. UConn, is in the semis on Friday against Villanova, who erased from a 17-point deficit to defeat St. John's and open Thursday night's doubleheader. It really is all gravy now. Everything that makes the garden unique is only boosted on Friday, and just participating in this stage is meaningful, both reward and opportunity. UConn-Villanova is a marquee event. The stakes are of course high. Every team still involved, no matter what the experience gets from here, triggered the depressurization knowing there were at least two hours left on this wild stage. "Not necessarily pressure from UConn," Hurley said. “I think there's pressure to validate the very good regular season we've had, to come in and beat a very good Seton Hall team. This group deserves to see a semi-final on Friday. … Thursday was pretty cool. But Friday's semifinals are even better.” A quarterfinal win over Seton Hall, Hurley's alma mater, is hardly something that would show up on a program highlights montage, signal a new direction in marketing, or slow traffic when the news of the Times Square tickers were running. After all, UConn has won this tournament seven times. But his special version of the huskies had never attempted such an environment in this new era. This was a new platform made so alive by everything that UConn fans had grown accustomed to for 30 years. UConn has gone back to its roots with its return to the great east. Now it's returning to something it first tasted and thrived on Thursday. The Huskies reached the semifinals last season — in a practically empty gym. Two years ago they got going late in the season and headed to Forth Worth, Tex. for a UK tournament that was canceled early in the pandemic. Three years ago, Hurley's freshman season, UConn defeated South Florida in an AAC first-round game in Memphis and was blown out by Houston 84-45 in the quarterfinals. After that game on the FedEx Forum, Hurley held a press conference and spoke about how far the program needed to go. "There was nobody at that game," Hurley said. It's the crime that CT attorneys say "fits almost all transactions": wire fraud These four CT women changed the game in medicine, manufacturing, genetics and astronomy. "This is our first Big East tournament, legit and authentic," Hurley said. “This was our first true live conference tournament game in front of fans in a few years. That's why you come to a place like UConn to play. The big dogs play in the quarters and semifinals. The place rocked with so many UConn fans. On Thursday was the welcome party. UConn fans hit Manhattan on buses and trains and made their presence felt. "Welcome to a packed Madison Square Garden, the most famous arena in the world," the announcer said during the final warm-up. Eleven years to the day after Cardiac Kemba Walker made his famous step backwards to beat Pitt, the defining moment of a five-win-five-day run that set the stage for the 2011 national championship, UConn reached another level back. The Huskies last played in front of fans at this tournament in 2012. UConn wasn't fooling around on the pitch. Andre Jackson (six points, six rebounds, four assists) influenced the game in ways that don't do box-score justice. Cole and Tyrese Martin each had 17 points. UConn held Seton Hall in 7-for-28 shooting in the first half to lead 29-18. The party started hours before the game and stretched from the sidelines to the upper bowl, down the tower's escalators and onto the downtown streets. UConn was back in New York for the first time in a long time. "We have the best fans in the world," said Cole. The garden is a special place.” Especially on a Friday evening in March. It's not a must-win game. It's a game to be experienced. Thoroughly beaten by Villanova in Philadelphia in early February, UConn won a Thriller in Hartford later in the month. The rubber match in the semifinals will not define the Huskies' season. It will feel like it has that power, for two hours on a stage that UConn has been absent from for so long.

Read

‘Thursday was pretty cool. But the semi-final on Friday is even better'

The UConn men's basketball team defeated Seton Hall in a Big East tournament on Thursday... (Author: Gardener)

ThursdayJ. Cole (2) and Isaiah Whaley (5) celebrate during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyler Polley, right, during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022 in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) during the second half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game against Seton Hall at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. Connecticut's Tyrese Martin (4) saves the ball from Seton Hall's Jared Rhoden during the first half of an NCAA collegiate basketball game at the Big East Conference Tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2022, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MARCH 10: Head coach Dan Hurley of the Connecticut Huskies reacts in the first half against the Seton Hall Pirates during the 2022 Big East Tournament at Madison Square Garden on March 10, 2022 in New York City. (Photo by Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images) NEW YORK -- To appreciate everything that will become of Madison Square Garden during the Big East Tournament -- how it feels, how it sounds, what it means -- takes more than one night and more than one game. This event always has a must-for-Friday feel, something Jim Calhoun talked about for years, something Dan Hurley certainly thought of both before and after the UConn men's basketball team with a 62-52 extended stay in Manhattan had earned a quarterfinal win over Seton Hall. "I got out of here a little earlier than usual just because I wanted to experience it," Hurley said well past midnight, walking across the plaza, the garden finally empty after being packed all Thursday. Because it's special.” The Garden really is a beautiful basketball contradiction. It's a museum and a zoo. It's sophisticated and obnoxious. It's great. It's rough. It's huge. It's stuffy. More for youWhat UConn's Dan Hurley said after Seton Hall's winHow UConn women could end up in the NCAA Bridgeport Regional A team can lose at the Garden in March and leave New York after feeling like they've seen it all. One and one at the Big East tournament? That's what the Huskies did on Thursday with perhaps their best defensive display of the season, smearing Seton Hall into a court surrounded by cheers and pushing the Pirates back to South Orange, N. UConn, is in the semis on Friday against Villanova, who erased from a 17-point deficit to defeat St. John's and open Thursday night's doubleheader. It really is all gravy now. Everything that makes the garden unique is only boosted on Friday, and just participating in this stage is meaningful, both reward and opportunity. UConn-Villanova is a marquee event. Every team still involved, no matter what the experience gets from here, triggered the depressurization knowing there were at least two hours left on this wild stage. "Not necessarily pressure from UConn," Hurley said. “I think there's pressure to validate the very good regular season we've had, to come in and beat a very good Seton Hall team. This group deserves to see a semi-final on Friday. … Thursday was pretty cool. But Friday's semifinals are even better.” A quarterfinal win over Seton Hall, Hurley's alma mater, is hardly something that would show up on a program highlights montage, signal a new direction in marketing, or slow traffic when the news of the Times Square tickers were running. After all, UConn has won this tournament seven times. But his special version of the huskies had never attempted such an environment in this new era. This was a new platform made so alive by everything that UConn fans had grown accustomed to for 30 years. UConn has gone back to its roots with its return to the great east. Now it's returning to something it first tasted and thrived on Thursday. The Huskies reached the semifinals last season — in a practically empty gym. Two years ago they got going late in the season and headed to Forth Worth, Tex. for a UK tournament that was canceled early in the pandemic. Three years ago, Hurley's freshman season, UConn defeated South Florida in an AAC first-round game in Memphis and was blown out by Houston 84-45 in the quarterfinals. After that game on the FedEx Forum, Hurley held a press conference and spoke about how far the program needed to go. "There was nobody at that game," Hurley said. Danbury opens new emergency operations center to help city respond to a 'looming' crisis. Thursday's Big East sessions sold out. "This is our first Big East tournament, legit and authentic," Hurley said. “This was our first true live conference tournament game in front of fans in a few years. That's why you come to a place like UConn to play. The big dogs play in the quarters and semifinals. The place rocked with so many UConn fans. On Thursday was the welcome party. UConn fans hit Manhattan on buses and trains and made their presence felt. "Welcome to a packed Madison Square Garden, the most famous arena in the world," the announcer said during the final warm-up. Eleven years to the day after Cardiac Kemba Walker made his famous step backwards to beat Pitt, the defining moment of a five-win-five-day run that set the stage for the 2011 national championship, UConn reached another level back. The Huskies last played in front of fans at this tournament in 2012. UConn wasn't fooling around on the pitch. That wasn't pretty basketball. Andre Jackson (six points, six rebounds, four assists) influenced the game in ways that don't do box-score justice. Cole and Tyrese Martin each had 17 points. UConn held Seton Hall in 7-for-28 shooting in the first half to lead 29-18. The lead was extended to 16 midway through the second half. The party started hours before the game and stretched from the sidelines to the upper bowl, down the tower's escalators and onto the downtown streets. UConn was back in New York for the first time in a long time. "We have the best fans in the world," said Cole. The garden is a special place.” Especially on a Friday evening in March. It's not a must-win game. It's a game to be experienced. Thoroughly beaten by Villanova in Philadelphia in early February, UConn won a Thriller in Hartford later in the month. The rubber match in the semifinals will not define the Huskies' season. It will feel like it has that power, for two hours on a stage that UConn has been absent from for so long.

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Daily Fantasy picks and tips for Friday

The first round of the 2022 Players Championship began on Thursday but was not completed. Weather affected the opening day of the tournament, with rain delaying the start of the round before play was later suspended... (Author: Gardener)

Daily FantasyWeather affected the opening day of the tournament, with rain delaying the start of the round before play was later suspended. You have to do this Friday morning, and the second round starts later in the day. But it's possible the weather will play a role throughout the weekend, as more rain is forecast for TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Although the opening round is still ongoing, the current leaders are Tommy Fleetwood and Tom Hoge, who are both six under par after playing a full 18 holes. Many other notable names are near the top, and it's possible they'll join them after the first round. It's not too early for Daily Fantasy players to look ahead to Round 2 and try to figure out who should be in Friday's round lineups. Here's a look at several names to build around, with their prices via DraftKings. As the world's No. 1 golfer, Jon Rahm again has the most expensive DFS award for Friday's second round promotion. On Thursday, he shared a glimpse of why he's usually worth such a high cost. The 27-year-old opened the Players with a 69 and is 11th with three under par. He had a pair of bogeys, but he also collected five birdies, including one on the ninth hole, to end his round on a typically solid performance. It was also the sixth time in Rahm's last nine rounds at TPC Sawgrass that he had shot a 69 or better. He's improved his finish in each of his last four appearances at the tournament and he's secured an early spot in the title fight this weekend. The Spaniard is likely to perform even better in the last three rounds and it's likely he will post an even lower score on Friday. Be confident of building a DFS lineup around Rahm who should start moving up the rankings Brian Harman started Thursday on the back nine and got off to a slow start, making three of his first bogeys in five holes. And yet, thanks to his impressive seven birdies, including one on the ninth hole to cap his round, he ended up four under par and a tied seventh. The 35-year-old has played well in 2022 and it was heartening to see him overcome a difficult start at TPC Sawgrass, which is a challenging course. After hitting a 68 early in this year's tournament, he could be set for an impressive weekend. Harman has finished in the top eight for the Players three times since 2014. That's true for 2021, too, when he finished third on 12 under par. So there's a good chance the Savannah, Georgia native will have another strong weekend as he clearly knows how to navigate the course well. That makes him a valuable DFS player at a reasonable price for Friday's second round. Harold Varner III put on a great performance during Thursday's opening round - right up to the final two holes. The 31-year-old was seven under par on 16 holes after collecting seven birdies, including five on the first seven of the back nine. But his round ended with a triple bogey on the 17th and a bogey on the 18th. As long as Varner can recover from that poor finish and play like he did for most of the first round, he should have a solid showing the rest of the tournament. He's unlikely to struggle as much on the 17th and 18th holes when he returns there on Friday. The Akron, Ohio native had previous success at TPC Sawgrass when he finished seventh in 2018 with 12 under par. But this year is the best. For the first time he shot better than 70 in the opening round. Considering Varner is available at such a low DFS price, he should offer tremendous value on Friday if he can have a similar round to Thursday's.

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Stormy Friday, warmer weekend ahead

Stormy Friday, warmer weekend ahead (Author: Gardener)

Friday, warmer weekendPlease use a supported version for the best MSN experience. Inflation hits these 7 food categories worst in grocery stores Trooper saves 10,000 runners from being mowed down by allegedly drunk driver FIRST WARNING WEATHER DAY: A bit of sleet hits Tarrant County To-do list: Worcester St. Patrick's Day Parade, Northeast ComicCon, Restaurant Week In Boston Spring in the seven day Three years later: Ames Levee outside Fremont rebuilt for $2 million after 2019 floods "Russia will not be able to encircle Kyiv," says former head of United States Army Europe, who Polish Ambassador to US: Sanctions against Moscow should last 'a decade' Dr. Gupta: Here's why CNN is calling this a pandemic (2020) Polish ambassador says country has been right about Putin since 2008. How Chelsea fans react to sanctions against club owner Hollywood Minute: First 'Obi-Wan Kenobi' trailer and 'The Tourist' How to save gas by being more frugal Harris: 'The US is ready to break every inch of NATO territory to defend" NYC cab driver: I'm barely surviving g with business downturn and soaring gas prices "I want to be an American": CNN talks to children fleeing war in Ukraine gets hit Ukraine accuses Russia of opening a children's and maternity home in the City of Mariupol was bombed Residents of southern Ukraine city of Mykolaiv prepare for Russian advance Exiled Russian oligarch says Putin's bankers must be blocked Former general reacts to new images of 40-mile Russian convoy Former general reacts to new images of 40-mile Russian convoy Miles-long Russian convoys These videos about the invasion have gone viral, but they're com totally made up These videos about the invasion have gone viral, but they're totally made up Jussie Smollett Condemnations: Get the Saga Jussie Smollett Conviction: Catch up on the 'A Moment of Remarkable Cool' Saga: Here's the Moment in where two Ukrainians defuse a live Russian bomb big stories of the day, explained in 10 minutes CNN10: The big stories of the day, explained in 10 minutes CNN10: The big stories of the day, explained in 10 minutes CNN10: The big stories of the day, explained in 10 minutes Jackson for the foulest mouth in Hollywood '10, 20 flights a day': NATO surveillance sees lots of activity from Belarus to Ukraine '10, 20 flights a day': NATO surveillance sees lots of activity from Belarus to Ukraine A US defense official confirms that Russian troops are advancing on Kyiv from several directions A US defense official confirms that Russian troops are advancing from several directions Advancing directions on Kyiv CNN's Foreman explains MLB tentative agreement Best of the week Best of the week The pandemic transformed this New York pianist into a baker of lifelike bouquets Since you're working remotely and don't want that to change, here are the top options to hit those blues seniors in post-holiday New York. Sway her hips back to normal in dance class. This is the most punctual airline in America and has earned the title for nearly two decades in a row. Are you the high achiever the royals are looking for? The first wobbly steps for this baby giraffe will probably be the cutest thing you'll see all day. Things to check off your list before daylight saving time. How much royal motherhood has changed over the years These bears have had to flee their home in Kyiv. Being a Police Officer Is All This 10-Year-Old Boy Dying of Cancer Was Looking For Somehow Jello Made The List Americans Think They're Unofficial Skin Experts Women Want To Help Other Women Succeed In Business How To Say 'I' -Balances Time, Home Cooking and Take Out A government agency wants to pay 'Grizzly Bear Conflict Manager' up to $100 K This Nigerian entrepreneur has created a new drink for adults. Queen Elizabeth has reportedly fully moved to Windsor Castle. This 97-year-old lives in a war zone ly at a Dollar Store How to save money on printer ink How to clean and care for non-stick pans The best way to cook chicken wings at home What NOT to cook in an air fryer How to clean and care Pillow How to Find the Best Ergonomics Mouse How to Prepare a Holiday Meal in an Air Fryer How to Thoroughly Clean an Air Fryer Camping Tip: How to Fold an Air Mattress

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Summary of Friday morning news

A collision between a Caltrain commuter train and railway tracks late Thursday... (Author: Gardener)

FridayA collision between a Caltrain commuter train and railroad tracks late Thursday morning injured 13 people, including two Caltrain employees. None of the injuries are life-threatening, according to Caltrain spokesman Dan Lieberman. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the collision and Caltrain officials are working closely with them to assist in the investigation. The collision, which occurred just before 10:40 a.m., caused system-wide delays, Lieberman said. The incident and subsequent NTSB investigation continued to impact the system early Thursday evening. A bus bridge operated by Caltrain to replace train service in the affected area is in effect until at least 4 p.m. Friday between South San Francisco and Millbrae Caltrain stations. For the remainder of the system, Caltrain will continue to operate on its regular weekday schedule. Passengers traveling between the South San Francisco and Millbrae train stations should expect service delays due to the bus bridge. Thursday morning's collision involved a southbound Caltrain commuter train carrying 75 passengers and Caltrain equipment on the route. Caltrain officials said passengers should consider alternative transportation options by visiting 511.org. Passengers can receive relevant service updates from Caltrain by following @CaltraINAlerts on Twitter and visiting the Caltrain Facebook page and Caltrain.com. A spokesman for the Oakland Fire Department said Thursday night that a fire that destroyed three RVs at a warehouse earlier in the day was an accident. Oakland Fire Department spokesman Michael Hunt said a person in one of the RVs was burning materials and the fire was getting out of control. Five people were displaced by the fire, Hunt said. It was originally reported that three people had been displaced. The RVs are on property managed by the City of Oakland and Operation Dignity, which helps shelter the homeless. The American Red Cross was notified so they could help the displaced. Oakland police have arrested a man in connection with the shooting of another man on Christmas Eve. Oakland Police spokesman Paul Chambers said Thursday afternoon that police arrested Emmanuel Gardner-Craft for his role in the December 24 murder of Ricky Bustos. Gardner-Craft was arrested Sunday when patrol officers tasked with patrolling the Lake Merritt area located him on the 500 block of Grand Avenue, where he was taken into custody. The officers were assigned to the area in response to phone calls and concerns from the community, Chambers said. Gardner-Craft was charged with murder by the Alameda County Attorney's Office. BART officials announced Thursday that Lateefah Simon was removed from the agency's board of directors after a dispute over whether she lived in the district she represents. According to BART, Simon's current residency is outside the boundaries of District 7, which includes portions of Alameda, Contra Costa and San Francisco counties, making her ineligible to represent the district on the board. Simon said in a statement to supporters that she moved from her previous residence last year because her family had been threatened over their support for police reform. BART officials said an interim board member will be selected within 60 days to fill the District 7 position. An American Canyon teenager was hit by an SUV on Wednesday, police said. American Canyon police were dispatched around 3 p.m. to a collision between a pedestrian and a vehicle in the area of ​​Silver Oak Trail and Toscana Drive. Upon arrival, police found a 15-year-old boy had been hit by a GMC SUV in the roadway. The youth had moderate injuries and was transported via CHP Air Ops to Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, police said. Witnesses told officers the youth did not cross a crosswalk. Speed ​​doesn't appear to be a factor, but police said they are investigating further. The National Weather Service forecast for Friday for the San Francisco Bay Area calls for brisk morning temperatures with Friday overnight lows in the high 30s to high 40s. Copyright © 2022 Bay City News, Inc. Republication, retransmission, or redistribution is prohibited without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. Bay City News is a 24/7 news service covering the greater Bay Area. Copyright © 2022 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, redistribution, or other reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited.

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Kyrie Irving single-handedly carried the nets, breaking analytics in the process

Not only did Kyrie Irving put on his best game in a controversial 2021-22 season, but the Brooklyn Nets star also set an overwhelming record. (Author: Gardener)

Kyrie IrvingThe 2021/22 season has not been easy for Kyrie Irving. But the Star Guard is only tasked with fixing the busted Brooklyn Nets half of their games. On Tuesday, Irving reminded the Nets and the rest of the NBA why he's still a star. Due to New York City's vaccination order, Irving is still unable to play for Brooklyn's home games. On Tuesday against the Charlotte Hornets, Irving had a game for the ages. The 6-foot-2 guard scored 50 points in Brooklyn's 132-121 win. He is now one of 22 players in NBA history with five or more 50-point games. The beauty of Irving's performance lay in its efficiency. Kyrie went off the field 15 of 19, good for 78.9%. "That was master class," teammate Kevin Durant, who scored 14 points, told ESPN after the game. "Younger players should watch this game and learn what it takes to score at this level." Irving has only played 17 games since his debut on Jan. 5. But he was a star when he was active, averaging 26.2 points on 47.7% shots from the field and 40.3% from three shots. He also hits 90.8% of his free throw attempts, second only to Stephen Curry among all players with four or more average attempts. As mentioned above, Irving hit 78.9% of his shots from the field. Kyrie wasn't just efficient...perhaps he broke one of the league's commonly used stats with his brilliance alone. True shot percentage is a statistic used in basketball to measure efficiency. Instead of the regular field goal percentage, True Shooting looks at the number of points scored versus the number of possessions they attempted to score. Irving scored 50 points on Tuesday. That number would then be divided by the sum of his 19 attempts and the multiplied result of his 13 free throw attempts and 0.44. Additionally, the entire denominator would be multiplied by two to put the number on a percentage scale. Irving's true shoot percentage would be calculated as follows: This means that Irving's true shoot percentage was 101.1%. Not only is he one of the few players to actually finish above 100.0% in general, but he now holds the NBA record for highest true shot percentage in a 50-point game. Both Fred Van Vleet and Jamal Murray had 50-point games with a true shooting percentage of 100% or better in 2020-21, but both finished under Kyrie. As if that wasn't interesting enough, Irving even knocked himself out of the top 3. The Star Guard lost 54 points with a 98.5% TS% against the Chicago Bulls in 2019-20. Irving's 50 Point Clinic was a masterclass, as Durant described it. And if true discussion of shooting wasn't enough to put his performance into perspective, perhaps this will be the case: Kyrie is now the second guard in NBA history to have multiple 50-point games, scoring 75.0% shot from the field. His airness has 31 games to score 50 or more, although only three had a field goal percentage of 75.0% or more. His first came on April 3, 1988 against the Detroit Pistons when he lost 59 points on a 77.8% shooting. A few months later, on November 16, Jordan scored 52 points at a whopping 82.8% from the floor against the Philadelphia 76ers. Then, on March 7, 1996, MJ scored 53 points on 75.0% shooting against Detroit. While he still has a long way to go to catch Jordan's 31 games at 50 or more, the fact that Irving can say he's the only other guard with multiple 75.0% or better shooting performance is enough. And it's a sign that Kyrie is still one of the most dominant forces in the league, despite the extrajudicial headache that has followed him. RELATED: Kyrie Irving Explained the Difference Between the Boston Celtics and His Brooklyn Nets in 2 Words

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Ben Simmons returned to Philadelphia and James Harden wasn't ready for the pressure

But we don't always focus on their competition. It's a league of quality (and insignificant) gossip to rival any game on the pitch. For the first time since his u (Author: Gardener)

Ben Simmons© Provided by For The Win The NBA is a league with some of the most physically gifted people in the world. But we don't always focus on their competition. It's a league of quality (and insignificant) gossip that rivals any of its games on the pitch. For the first time since his unspectacular move from the 76ers, Ben Simmons returned to Philadelphia as a member of the Brooklyn Nets (+4.5 underdogs). Honestly, we should have seen this awkward night coming. A night of unresolved bad blood, poor communication, and (perceived?) disrespect should probably have been a prerequisite for Ben Simmons Night in Philly. Kevin Durant and James Harden didn't acknowledge each other during the warm up. Neither did Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid. Please give me seven games. — Alec Sturm (@Alec_Sturm) March 11, 2022 Luckily, the competition didn't take a backseat to the drama. The new-look Nets (minus Simmons) beat the new-look 76ers with James Harden. My mistake. The new-look Nets beat the new-look 76s 129-100 and humiliated them in the biggest game of the season in Philadelphia. The Nets basically took every shot they took, or at least that's what it felt like. Meanwhile, the 76ers, which has been a common theme for them in recent years, struggled to stand on their own two feet like a cartoon deer in a burning forest. Even more notable was who failed to perform for Philadelphia. It couldn't have been Joel Embiid, a prime MVP candidate, adding his usual high-end double-double. Nobody in the league has an answer for him, and nobody will when the playoffs start. Under no circumstance. He shows up when his team needs him! Gasp: It was James Harden! Harden up, give in to the pressure? If Harden wasn't nervous about playing his friend (former?) Kevin Durant, he showed it terribly. Harden must have been hurt, right? Played like it was a playoff game. pic.twitter.com/4h3JT3F1w3— StatMuse (@statmuse) March 11, 2022 Simmons didn't even play! The Nets weren't even at full strength and based on his history with the Thunder, Rockets and yes, the Nets, Harden played like it was a second-round playoff game. Ask the Philadelphia faithful: Ben Simmons Night is a second-round playoff game, and they expect better. Things got so bad for Harden and the 76ers that they decided to wave the white flag -- with a full quarter to go. The Sixers starters didn't fire a single shot in tonight's fourth quarter. A touching tribute to Ben Simmons on his return to Philly. pic.twitter.com/bdwL7qxSlq - StatMuse (@statmuse) March 11, 2022 I don't know what the future holds for the Embiid-Harden 76ers or the Durant-Simmons (eventually) Nets. Still, Harden's performance on a night that should be a statement for Philadelphia is disturbing. When these Nets and these 76s meet in the postseason, both fanbases can find solace in the fact that Simmons may be downing Brooklyn in clutch moments just as Harden could be downing Philadelphia. Gannett may earn revenue from Tipico for viewer recommendations on betting services. Tipico has no control over, nor is such revenue in any way dependent on or connected to the newsrooms or reporting. General terms and conditions see Tipico.com. Steph Curry surprised a devastated fan who couldn't see him play. The gender discrimination lawsuit against PlayStation intensifies as eight more women come forward

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Simmons sits, Harden fights, nets sizzle in a chaotic 76ers reunion

The Nets are quick to silence Philadelphia's willing reception for Ben Simmons while also making a point of their own. (Author: Gardener)

HardenBen Simmons didn't play a minute for the Philadelphia 76ers in the 2021-22 season before being traded to Brooklyn in February. With the weight of that ordeal still fresh in everyone's mind, many wondered if he would travel to, let alone play for, his new team's first game in a city ready to shower him with "brotherly love." The mockery only grew when Simmons suggested not shooting but simply passing in on his teammates — and needing the most visible reminder of his last game for the 76ers. The arena's fear returned when Simmons had the gall to pick up a loose ball that bounced its way over the bench in the later stages of the game. But Simmons greeted it with a smile. His new Brooklyn teammates applauded the crowd, who were all smiling and laughing because the scoreboard had rendered Philadelphia's famous disdain irrelevant until then. Brooklyn's 129-100 smash against Philadelphia ended up being just as vindictive as Sixers fans were against Simmons. The Nets had their own emotional point to make, and it was theirs that lingered long after the last Philly fan left the building. Durant and Irving combined for 49 points in an absurd 20-on-31 shooting clip. Her performance was a stark contrast to her own decorated former teammate James Harden. The former Kia MVP, who played 16 total games with his two co-stars in Brooklyn, shot a pathetic 3-on-17, including 0-on-10 arcs. Brooklyn enjoyed every minute of it. There was more, much more than the whole team laughing with Simmons on the bench. With Joel Embiid making an early move, Durant willingly met the MVP nominee's ready words with some of his own, aware of the heat of the moment and embracing them. Seth Curry turned and spoke to his former teammates on the Sixers bench after drilling another 3-pointer, a reminder that he might not have been pleased to have been drawn into the Harden-Simmons trade so readily to be. All night long, the Nets never stopped scoring points or making a point in a matchup of Superstars whose paths have crossed and criss-crossed and parted sharply. "It just felt good to calm them all down mid-game," Durant said. We don't hear Ben Simmons chants from the Sixers fans anymore.” Such is the loyalty of every team to its new star in place of the old one who no longer wanted to be there. As early as the week of the trade itself — when Durant avoided making Harden his all-star team so blatantly that no one on the show could stop laughing — it was clear the Nets were ready to take on the failed triple Superstar -Leaving experiment behind. Now it's all about Simmons arriving in Brooklyn with a clean slate he never could have enjoyed in Philadelphia. "We consider Ben our brother," Durant said. Meanwhile, the City of Brotherly Love was all too happy to swap its own star who wasn't acting for one that does. Meanwhile, each Harden failure was reminiscent of other big games where many expected more of him, most of them in post-season situations that will return in a matter of weeks. If those postseason demons return, they could do so in the form of the same Nets team that essentially won Thursday's game at halftime while shooting 56% overall and 45% from deep. Brooklyn's playoff path likely begins in the play-in tournament. If it wins its first game it will be the 7th seed with Philadelphia very strong in the game to face them in 2nd seed. By then, Simmons will likely be playing, and he'll have to talk and play and win for himself. Until then, his teammates are more than happy to have his back.

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