Blog

A first alert update for the winter storm

First Alert meteorologists Meg McNamara and Tim Williams provide the latest update on the Nor'easter bringing snow to the region. A blizzard warning is in effect in Wicimico, Somerset and Worcester counties. (Author: Gardener)

firstThe universe is scary. There are dangers galore including black holes, asteroid impacts, supernova explosions and more. However, these events tend to be distant and/or extremely rare, so you don't really need to worry about them in your day-to-day life. If there's any astronomical event that we need to take very, very seriously, even more than asteroid and comet impacts, it's these.

Read

When select cities face the impact of the Northeast

A major Nor'easter will sweep up the US east coast this weekend, beginning Friday night, with significant impacts on cities. (Author: Gardener)

NortheastBlizzard Warning in effect from Saturday 7:00 AM until Sunday 5:00 AM. Blizzard Warning in effect from Saturday 7:00 AM until Sunday 5:00 AM. Peak: Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Snowfall of 2-4 inches per hour possible. Peak: Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Snowfall of 2-4 inches per hour possible. Peak: Friday evening through Saturday morning, with possible snowfall of 1 inch per hour. Winter storm warning applies from 7 p.m. Friday to 3 p.m. Saturday. Winter storm warning applies from 7 p.m. Friday to 3 p.m. Saturday. Winter storm warning applies from 7 p.m. Friday to 3 p.m. Saturday. Winter storm warning from 4 p.m. Friday to Saturday 4 a.m. Winter weather warning valid from 9 p.m. Friday to Saturday 9 a.m. Winter weather warning valid from 9 p.m. Friday to Saturday 9 a.m.

Read

Winter Storm Warnings and Warnings as the East Coast prepares for Nor'easter and Blizzard conditions

It could be the biggest Nor'easter in years as parts of New Jersey, Maine, Massachusetts and Maryland are under blizzard warnings. (Author: Gardener)

Winter Storm Warnings and WarningsWinter storm watches and warnings have been issued for much of the U. The coastal region, which stretches from eastern Maryland to Maine, is expected to see the most snowfall, with a foot or two of snow -- or more -- possible in parts of New England, according to the National Weather Service. It could be the biggest North Easter in years and is expected to take place from Friday evening through Saturday. "Numerous hazards are likely from heavy snowfall with significant accumulations in eastern Long Island, New England to gusty winds and coastal issues," forecasters said Friday. "In fact, the combination of snow and wind can create blizzard conditions." Parts of New Jersey, Maine, Massachusetts and Maryland are under snowstorm warnings, meaning severe winter weather -- including whiteout conditions -- can be seen or expected within the next 12 to 36 hours. Blizzard conditions are not associated with snow totals, but are due to wind and visibility, CBS Boston reports. People are urged not to travel under this warning. FlightAware said S. flights were canceled on Friday and 2,400 for Saturday. The New Jersey governor has declared a state of emergency from 5 p.m. and urged everyone to stay off the streets. In Boston, where a snowstorm warning has been issued, residents are bracing — the area could be hit by about two feet of snow. And about 40 minutes from Boston, the city of Scituate, Massachusetts, is encouraging voluntary evacuations, handing out sandbags and preparing emergency vehicles, Mola Lenghi reported for CBS Mornings. Winter weather warnings have been issued for parts of Kentucky, West Virginia, the Carolinas and Virginia, declaring states of emergency. Below a warning, potentially hazardous weather is occurring or is expected. Officials are urging people to monitor the storm and be prepared as it moves on. "Bitter cold air" is expected after the storm.

Read

The forecast shows which city will be the "heart of the storm" for the winter weather

Blizzard warnings have been issued for parts of the northeast coast. New York City and Philadelphia are now under a winter storm warning. CNN meteorologist Tom Sater reveals who will see the biggest impact. (Author: Gardener)

winterYou are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience. Blizzard warnings have been issued for parts of the northeast coast. New York City and Philadelphia are now under a winter storm warning. General Milley says if forces were unleashed on Ukraine it would be "terrible" and "not necessary". Amb. to Russia: Putin 'likes this uncertainty' about Ukraine Fmr. US Ambassador: Putin 'concerned' about possible US sanctions Here's how it begins: Snow across Northeast as storm intensifies overnight Bitter cold snap delivers lowest temperatures of Florida season Snow blankets the Southeast on its way around New England to bury Calm before the storm as eastern Massachusetts prepares for a blizzard Uncovering the hidden history of the Buffalo Soldiers Two US soldiers practice skiing for the 2022 Olympics Snow spreads from the Rocky Mountains to the Plains How to safely through Snow, Ice and Mud Goes The Groundhog Day Story You May Not Know Meet the man who takes care of Punxsutawney Phil. View Punxsutawney's many statues honoring their legendary groundhog which city will be the heart of the storm for the winter weather forecast shows which city will be the heart of the storm for the winter weather clip pro brings more chances of snow for the Great Lakes Clipper brings more chances of snow for the Great Lakes Forecast shows which areas could be excluded from worst winter storms Forecast shows which areas could be excluded from worst winter storms Rain, snow and ice across much of the east Powerful winter storm prepares to bring rain, snow and ice to bring to much of the east north east how long before the snow goes away? Heavy snowfall in the west and risk of severe storms in the south Heavy storms in the south bring the New Year with them

Read

Powerful winter storm blasting US East Coast with up to two feet of snow

Residents in the northeast and mid-Atlantic regions braced themselves for blizzard conditions as officials issued travel warnings (Author: Gardener)

winterResidents and officials in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic United States braced themselves for a strong winter storm on Friday that is expected to create snowstorm conditions through Saturday. Heavy snow and high winds were expected to begin in parts of the Carolinas and Appalachians Friday night, according to the National Weather Service. The system will then intensify, bringing east coast snow conditions to New England, where forecasters warned of localized snowfall of up to 20 inches and wind gusts of 50 to 60 miles per hour. Local officials rushed to declare snow emergencies and issue parking bans, warning windblown snow could make travel nearly impossible and colder temperatures could mean dangerous wind chills after the storm passed on Saturday night. In Virginia, where a snowstorm earlier this month stranded hundreds of motorists for hours along a major freeway, Gov. Glenn Youngkin declared a state of emergency and said officials had begun to position their resources in anticipation of downed trees, power outages and major impact travel. The state's East Coast faced possible snowstorm conditions that could bring winds of up to 50 mph, up to a foot of heavy and wet snow, and possible tidal flooding. "The key message for all Virginians is to be aware of weather conditions and to stay off the streets as much as possible," the governor said. Similar snowfall forecasts were expected coastal into the Philadelphia and New York City areas, with coastal communities from the New Jersey shore to the suburbs of Long Island and southeastern Connecticut potentially seeing heavier snowfall rates and stronger winds. As of Friday noon, airlines had canceled more than 1,000 U.S. flights and canceled about 2,500 flights scheduled for Saturday, according to tracking service FlightAware. Some of the hardest-hit airports were those in Chicago, the New York City area, and Boston. In New England, where scattered bands of snow could fall nearly 3 feet in places, the inevitable rush for bread, eggs, milk and other groceries at grocery stores was in full swing. "We are asking shoppers to buy what they need and save some for their neighbors," the Quincy, Massachusetts grocery chain said. At Maine Hardware in Portland, a steady stream of customers stocked up on storm needs when officials took the rare step of issuing a blizzard warning. "It sounds like it's going to be a big deal," he said.

Read

Powerful winter storm that will hit the east coast

It could be the biggest Nor'easter in years as parts of New Jersey, Maine, Massachusetts and Maryland are under blizzard warnings. (Author: Gardener)

winterWinter storm watches and warnings have been issued for much of the U. The coastal region, which stretches from eastern Maryland to Maine, is expected to see the most snowfall, with a foot or two of snow -- or more -- possible in parts of New England, according to the National Weather Service. It could be the biggest North Easter in years and is expected to take place from Friday evening through Saturday. "Numerous hazards are likely from heavy snowfall with significant accumulations in eastern Long Island, New England to gusty winds and coastal issues," forecasters said Friday. "In fact, the combination of snow and wind can create blizzard conditions." Parts of New Jersey, Maine, Massachusetts and Maryland are under snowstorm warnings, meaning severe winter weather -- including whiteout conditions -- can be seen or expected within the next 12 to 36 hours. Blizzard conditions are not associated with snow totals, but are due to wind and visibility, CBS Boston reports. FlightAware said S. flights were canceled on Friday and 3,700 for Saturday. The governors of Virginia, Maryland, New York, New Jersey and Rhode Island have declared states of emergency, and Boston Mayor Michelle Wu has declared a snow emergency for the city. The NHL announced late Friday that the New York Islanders game against the Seattle Kraken, scheduled for Saturday at the UBS Arena on Long Island, will be postponed to Wednesday. In Boston, where a snowstorm warning has been issued, residents are bracing — the area could be hit by about two feet of snow. According to CBS Boston, the city was last hit by snowstorms almost four years ago. The weekend's Nor'easter could even break Boston's January record for the largest snowstorm in the city's recorded history. Meanwhile, the storm in New Jersey could also break records. According to Accuweather, the projected 10 to 15 inches of snow could make for Atlantic City's snowiest January on record. It's the first time that New Jersey has been under a snowstorm warning since 2018. Cities and states much further south could also see storm impact. Winter weather warnings have been issued for parts of Kentucky, West Virginia, the Carolinas and Virginia. Below a warning, potentially hazardous weather is occurring or is expected. Officials are urging people to monitor the storm and be prepared as it moves on.

Read

Winter storm warning for Philly, with snowstorm conditions predicted for the coast

A winter storm warning for potentially significant snow was upgraded to a winter storm warning for most of the Philadelphia area, while the Jersey shore was under a warning for snowstorm conditions and could see up to 18 inches near shore. The Jersey Shore is expected to be... (Author: Gardener)

WinterA pedestrian dressed for the cold weather walks past an advertisement for the Winter Olympics near 17th and JFK Blvd. A winter storm is expected later this week. A winter storm warning for potentially significant snow was upgraded to a winter storm warning for most of the Philadelphia area, while the Jersey shore was under a warning for snowstorm conditions and could see up to 18 inches near shore. Officially, the Weather Service called for 6 to 8 inches in the immediate Philadelphia area. The Jersey Shore is forecast to be covered in snow from Friday night through Saturday morning, with up to 18 inches expected in Atlantic City. Initially, meteorologists warned that almost any outcome is possible, and whatever happens, areas directly west of the heavier snow shield may well be ruled out. The coast, on the other hand, could be clocked, forecasters said. Anything is possible in Philly winters Light snowfall began Friday morning but was not part of the heavier snow expected to fall Friday evening, said Patrick O'Hara, a weather forecaster with the National Weather Service. "It will be off and on throughout the day but there really won't be any snow to speak of, although there may be a slight accumulation. It's not the bigger storm," he said. The heavier snow is expected to fall after dark on Friday through Saturday afternoon, O'Hara said. Up to 8 inches are expected in the Philadelphia area, he said. Although the snow could stop by midday on Saturday, the low temperatures and wind chill are enough for O'Hara to recommend staying indoors for the day. Winds of 10 to 15 miles per hour are expected during Friday night's snow. But sustained winds of 20mph are expected on Saturday, with some gusting between 30 and 35mph, he said. "With this type of wind, the wind chill will be in the single digits at best," O'Hara said. It means snow and blowing snow are expected to reduce visibility to a quarter mile or less for 3 hours or more, along with sustained winds of 35 mph or more. "The model volatility with this system was something to look at," Chat Shafer, a senior meteorologist at Mount Holly's office, said in the Weather Service's morning discussion. All signs pointed to a major coastal storm, perhaps a "bomb cyclone," detonating off the Atlantic coast and that coastal areas would receive the most snow. (The snow could be pretty heavy over the ocean, but at least it's well salted.) The coming storm could become a "bomb cyclone." Just what does that mean? The snow could last for most of Saturday, Weather Service meteorologist Alex Staarmann said. The prediction is particularly challenging because the storm has so many moving parts, Pydynowski said. S. network of weather balloons, he said. Additionally, it originated in the Pacific and observations over the oceans are lacking, said Rick Knabb, senior meteorologist at the Weather Channel. Road brood before winter storms are gaining traction around Philly and the nation. The system was intended to spawn a significant storm off the southeast coast that would reach maturity somewhere farther north. Temperatures on Saturday are not expected to rise higher than the mid-20s in the afternoon, with gusts of up to 30mph around Philly, and not making it to freezing on Sunday. By Wednesday, Groundhog Day, readings are expected to rise to 50.

Read

Winter storm forecast, updates as blizzards and heavy snowfall on east coast

Temperatures across New England will drop below freezing in many places as locals brace for a cold snap. (Author: Gardener)

New England- Areas in New England received up to 30.5 cm (12 inches) of snow, while many received up to 10 to 15 cm (4 to 6 inches) of snow. A snowstorm and winter storm warning has been issued for parts of the East Coast, ahead of a powerful nor'easter expected to bring two feet or more of snow, violent gusts of wind and coastal flooding across New England on Saturday. Blizzard and winter storm warnings have been issued for parts of the east coast, ahead of a powerful nor'easter expected to drop two feet or more of snow, bring fierce gusts of wind and cause coastal flooding in New England on Saturday. A statement from the National Weather Service (NWS) on Friday said the Nor'easter is expected to develop off the Mid-Atlantic coast on Friday, before hitting eastern parts of the Northeast and New England this weekend. Moderate to heavy snowfall and squalls are expected to begin Friday night along the mid-Atlantic and northeastern coasts as the low hits offshore North Carolina, the agency said. “Numerous hazards are likely from heavy snowfall with significant accumulations in eastern Long Island/New England to gusty winds and coastal issues. In fact, the combination of snow and wind can create blizzard conditions," the NWS statement added. Heavy snowfall is also expected in the central and southern Appalachia. Heavy snowfall and strong winds are then expected to develop over New England on Saturday as the Northeast picks up ahead of the Northeast Coast. Blizzards are forecast from eastern Long Island through much of the New England coast, particularly from southeast Maine to Cape Cod, the NWS said. Winter storm warnings and warnings are in effect for much of the mid-Atlantic coastline to the northeast coast. The NWS said the heaviest snow is likely to fall over the area stretching from the east coast of Maryland to most of Maine, where 6 to 12 inches are likely. There will likely be a sharp drop in snow totals on the western side. pic.twitter.com/73t4F5rsXC - NWS Eastern Region (@NWSEastern) January 27, 2022 Parts of coastal New England where snowstorms are expected can experience anywhere from 1 to 2 feet of snow, with locally higher snow levels possible, particularly over the Massachusetts coast. The NWS said highs will be 15 to 25 degrees below average in most storm-hit locations. “There is still uncertainty about how closely the storm will follow the coast, which will determine how far west (inland) the heavy snow will travel. “There is still uncertainty as to how closely the storm will follow the coast, which will determine how far west (inland) the heavy snow will push. There will likely be a sharp fall in the amount of snow on the west side," the NWS eastern region tweeted. WHDH reported that coastal areas in Barnstable, Dukes, Essex, Norfolk, Plymouth and Suffolk counties will be hit by a snow storm warning from 7 a.m. Saturday through 5 a.m. Sunday The news channel reported that Boston over the weekend is issuing its first snow storm warning since January 2018.

Read

Everything Tom Izzo Said Before Michigan State vs Michigan Basketball Game

Spartan head coach Tom Izzo discusses the Illinois loss, the Michigan game and more (Author: Gardener)

Tom IzzoSpartan Head Coach Tom Izzo Discusses Loss to Illinois, Game to Michigan and Many More On Thursday, Michigan State head basketball coach Tom Izzo met with the media to discuss a variety of topics leading up to the Spartans' home game vs to discuss rivals Michigan on Saturday. “First you learn that it's hard to win on the street. It took me over 30 years to figure that out, but I was disappointed that we didn't play better on the road after a good road trip to Wisconsin. I think we've had some great training days and meetings so far [since Tuesday]. We're headed into a four-of-five game stretch.” “Except for Marcus [Bingham Jr.], no one played great on Tuesday. To win away or in this league it takes more than a couple of guys who are performing well.” “I think getting Gabe [Brown] back up and running is important. He's been really good all year and maybe had a few games when he was down but I think he's been training at a higher level. “Every time you play against your rival, things are… picked up. I know our fans are looking forward to Saturday, and so are our coaches.” “They play much better. When we went to play them down there, they had a losing streak of three or four games. And now they have a three-game winning streak. [They] average a lot more points, shooting 55 percent from the field and almost 50 percent from the threes.” “They're a big team, with [Hunter] Dickinson obviously a monster in it. [Moussa] Diabate is a lot better than it was a month ago - typical for a newbie. Maybe one of the bigger ones in our league because both Illinois and Purdue play smaller power forwards. So, with Diabate in there, I think it makes [Michigan] very big.” It's been around forever, I think. He makes great plays, he makes great decisions, he gets all the loose balls. "With the amount of guys starting to play well, they're probably one of the most talented teams in our league. We're just looking forward to the opportunity to regain some momentum that we were starting to get.” “It was a bit difficult. That's one of the things that's been difficult for us and maybe other teams, but you go to Illinois and you're like, "Does the so-in-so play or not?" You watch a movie about Michigan and say, "Well, you had a couple of guys for a couple of games and then they didn't play some of those games. “They are a different team than the ones we wanted to play against the first time. [Michigan Guard Devante] Jones is playing better right now. You shoot the ball better. Houston had a three-game hot streak, and he really struggled to shoot it beforehand. So you play better and your sample size is slightly smaller. We didn't use a lot [of the prep work] from the start, but we used a few things. For the most part we look at those [last] three or four games to make assessments of how we want to cover things and what game plan we want to use. “We will try to cover him in different ways. he plays well He's got that deadly jump hook, we all know that. He's shooting it a little bit better from the periphery." "We're hoping to let them run and get them up and down a little bit more." “What I liked best last week – Marcus started blocking shots again in Illinois. He looked a lot more energetic [in Illinois] and he did that in practice today and yesterday just at the meetings I had with him.” Hopefully we can get him active and if he's active I think he'll be a lot can cause problems. “If you look at the entire game, this is a team that shoots the living daylights out of it. And these new guys that they had instead of Kofi [Cockburn] sprinting up in these ball sevens and sprinting back and giving us problems that I'm not going to say we weren't ready for, but we had to make some adjustments. It was offensive and again you have nine turnovers in the first half. So I think it hurt us offensively.” We still recovered well, we still defended well and we played some very good games on the track. “We kind of forget that Michigan and Illinois were the top 5-10 teams in all preseason [polls]. That's how they all looked. So there are some bumps in the road, but the beauty of basketball is that it really doesn't matter what you do in November or December. "I think there's no question Michigan is playing a lot better than it was a month ago. Mainly because they shoot better and that makes a difference.” He's been very solid in a lot of games lately. It's all about again, if you don't flip the ball it gets more chances, you get a rhythm." "Earlier this year...You saw Gabe [Brown] hit three, four shots almost in a row. You know, start our running game, start this and that. And then when you start flipping the ball again, there's never that rhythm.” “There are certain things I don't worry about. I worry a lot at night. He gets it, he gets it, and he'll eat anything to get going.” If you give Gabe Brown more shot attempts: If you have ten shots fewer than your opponent, your best shooters should get two or three of them. If you're feeling better and don't flip it, you'll get our [quick] break. So it's just about taking care of the ball.” He's able to reach the offensive glass a bit better, which he's gradually improving. It's not all Gabe or Max. Our point guards need to do a better job. You can have all these great receivers, but if you don't have a quarterback ... our quarterback has to work a little better at getting them the ball." Whether it's home or away, nobody wants to play in front of anybody, that's clear." "If you Playing rivalry games, as Jud Heathcote used to say, there aren't as many of them as you think, these are rivalry games for real. It helps when they're in the same condition, helps when there's some closeness in the distance, and it helps when both teams are good. There aren't that many important rivalries, I think John Beilein once said that and I have to agree with him.” Coaches try to do their part and players do their part, but it's the fans. There's 550,000 to 600,000 of them out there on Saturday, and at least half of them live or die on whether we win or lose. That's the beauty of a rivalry.” Playing in the rivalry game after losing turnover: “I don't think it's [matters]. We've shown where we can play very well and we've shown where we're giving people most of all in our turnovers – just remember, you can say you only beat this team by 10. Just remember to get 10 more shots. If you shoot 40 percent, which everyone does, that's four more shots times two points, that's eight points more. "I promise you it's on our list. We record every turnover in practice, we try to do different things. But nobody turns the ball over on purpose. I just think that sometimes there is a lack of concentration. Sometimes it's immaturity, sometimes it's people in new positions like our point guards. Sometimes the newbie comes in, everyone goes through it. I don't rate myself very highly when I take care of this. I think it needs to be addressed, but it's not because we're not working on it. When the day comes when we do that, I say the team goes from really good to maybe great, and I hope that happens." "Every time you play a rival, Jud would say, 'You all count one, but this one counts more'. I think that's true, but I don't see it that way because we're playing Michigan, now we're going to go up. I think we know - the boys were down about how they played. That doesn't take anything away from Illinois. It's just the way we played. When we played well and lost, it's bearable. But if we don't play very well and lose, that's unacceptable.” On the disappointment of the postponement of the first game in Michigan: “The irony of it all is – eh, were they on a three-game losing streak back then? And we had a seven or eight game win streak.” “The great teams get up for every game. Those with great leadership, that's something we're still looking for because -- if you're really good, not elite, but really good, you're playing [against] yourself half the time as much as you're playing against yourself Opponent. That's what I'm about. I'm all about getting better every day. The wins and the losses will be in place, but are we getting better? There were times last week in practice and everything - I told you when we were winning and not getting any better. I have a feeling they are starting to understand why and why and now it corrects it. “You try to treat each child a little differently. Because I didn't think they understood what the hell was going on. Well, I think they get it... The first thing people say is, "Are they playing scared of making a mistake?" That's such a false statement. It took me until the start of the Big Ten [schedule] to look at the stats and say, "Ten shots down." Our defense was holding [opponents] at 40 percent and under, and how many layups did players throw at us on turnovers? I tried to use the incredible positives, like if we don't flip it, we shoot 48 percent, we shoot 40 percent of the three. We shoot from the [free throw] line 78 percent of the time. "Not every kid wants to play defense, but nobody wants to turn the ball over because everyone wants more shots, including me. So we tried to handle it differently. "The [sales] bundles are killers, and sometimes maybe I should waste some time off sooner. Because those bundles -- we've had eight and nine in eight and nine minutes more than once. And then, like last week, we went 23 or 24 minutes with no turnover or two turnovers. “Just look at the difference in this game [Illinois]. You're talking about the defense - the defense gets energy by not rotating the ball. They last ten minutes, they don't score and we don't turn it around and suddenly the game changes.” “I know it's frustrating and I wish I had an answer for you, but I promise you one thing – there was many sleepless nights trying to figure it out. There's been a lot of calls with coaches across the country.” “We've been catching up a bit more in the last two weeks and we're not worried about the lads going down or this and that. I think we're recovering better. Our performance in the last two games has been phenomenal with guys performing. We're not giving up offensive rebounds, which you know was the other [problem]. I mean, Northwestern - what did we have, 17 turnovers and they had 17 offensive rebounds? So the number of shots, I think they had 68 and we had 51 or so. How is it a two point game? Because our defense was good for the most part, we just didn't finish the job with Michigan State's normal cutout — rebound and run. That's how it all adds up.” “If you're great at everything, you'd be the No. 1 team in the country and then we'll just register for the Final Four. We're a long way from that. We don't have much room for error. In Illinois and Michigan and maybe in Purdue - maybe the level of talent is a little different. But I like some of our veterans who know what they're doing and I like the fact that we have some people who have been through the wars too. I think this team will continue to grow. It wasn't long ago that we had a nine-game winning streak. I'll keep looking at the positives, I just want to improve in a couple of areas."

Read

Bitcoin is not a right-wing conspiracy. It's inherently inclusive, despite what critics say.

One might think that Bitcoin is a creature of the political right. But it's not - and politicizing technology is counterproductive. (Author: Gardener)

If Tom Brady and Matt Damon aren't proof enough, consider the vociferous conservative Bitcoin fans. Tucker Carlson, Ted Cruz, and Newt Gingrich tout it as a digital property useful for power grids and as a back-up facility. Bitcoin is increasingly replacing gold in ads on conservative talk radio. Nayib Bukele's centre-right populist regime has even made it legal tender in El Salvador. One might think that Bitcoin is a creature of and for the political right. But it's not - and politicizing technology is counterproductive. Wealth Building: Black, Latino, and LGBTQ investors see crypto investments like Bitcoin as "a new path" to wealth and justice. Yes, prominent Democrats still describe Bitcoin as unregulated, polluting, risky, and better for terrorists and gamblers than ordinary citizens. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton suggested it could crowd out the mighty dollar and destabilize democracies everywhere. Imagine if, in the early days of the Internet, its use had become a political marker rather than a public good. A similar tragedy is now unfolding with Bitcoin. Bitcoin's critics include numbers that are rather different from Sen. Warren. Establishment figures like JPMorgan Chase chief executive Jamie Dimon, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and Bank of England's Andrew Bailey don't seem to like it either. None of this fits well with the theory that Bitcoin is right-wing. Its more outspoken critics seem to prefer the financial status quo to a decentralized network that states, corporations, and autocrats cannot control. My year of self-sufficiency: The supply chain crisis has reached even me But it is also liberating and opening up new worlds of connection, engagement and opportunity. Bitcoin does the same thing, not with information but with money. In that sense, the design and use of bitcoin is no more right-wing than the internet itself. By engaging and protecting marginalized investors, it promotes values ​​shared by centists, liberals, and progressives. America's outdated financial systems exclude people and perpetuate inequality. They need trust in ledgers, loan officers, cashiers and credit agencies that serve the rich better than the poor. People of color can be unfairly denied bank accounts and loans, or targeted by predatory payday lenders. Commercial banks block ex-inmates from accessing banking, payment, or credit services, making it difficult for them to return to meaningful work. Financial inclusion matters. Access to savings, payments, and credit enables human thriving. Bitcoin makes this easier for everyone and with more volume than PayPal. At only 13 years old, it is already the most comprehensive and open financial network ever. Anyone who owns a cheap smartphone can use it to send or receive money, regardless of location, race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, credit score, or immigration status. It is therefore not surprising that ethnic minorities in the US have adopted Bitcoin faster than their white counterparts. About a billion people worldwide live under double-digit inflation, which primarily harms the poor. If you're stuck with the Brazilian real or Turkish lira, your financial prospects are hopeless: prices are rising, wages lag behind and hard assets elude you. I'm a truck driver: A real "supply chain crisis" is a lack of companies that treat us with respect. The United States is facing its worst inflation in decades, exacerbating wealth inequality between black and white Americans. Bitcoin's limited supply and inclusive design, on the other hand, offers inflation-resistant savings technology for the masses. The rich may still find refuge from the dollar in gold, stocks, or real estate; The global poor may turn to Bitcoin. Around the globe, people are embracing it faster than the internet. The countries with the highest acceptance include India, Kenya, Venezuela and Vietnam. Traditional payment systems grant almost unlimited powers to government and corporate actors to block payments. Authoritarian governments spy on transactions and arrest people who have bought illicit goods or donated to dissident movements. Corporate authorities follow suit, blocking payments to legal marijuana dispensaries, adult film actors, unorthodox intellectuals, or Muslim charities. Bitcoin's payment network protects against systemic injustices and the whims of autocrats. Dissidents and victims of monetary repression find refuge there. Progressives familiar with Bitcoin know all of this. Also members of other political groups on the right and left who care about the oppressed. Bitcoin's appeal is indeed broad. Across the political spectrum, we should recognize that this is a force for good that needs to be nurtured and channeled rather than suppressed. Bailey, Bradley Rettler, and Craig Warmke, a writer for Atomic Finance, are Fellows of the Bitcoin Policy Institute. This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Bitcoin is not a right-wing conspiracy. It's inherently inclusive, despite what critics say.

Read